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The names appearing below are just a fraction of the Canadian women of accomplishment. Check out The Famous Canadian Women 's section ON THE JOB  which contains mini profiles of 2000 Canadian Women of Achievement.

Lawyers Many lawyers went on to become  politicians. Be sure to check out the Politicians section as well.    
1880's

Clara Brett Martin. Born Toronto, Ontario circa 1874.  Died October 30, 1923.  After receiving an honours BA from Trinity College in Toronto in 1888, The Law Society of Upper Canada refused to accept her as a student. Enlisting the help of notable and forceful people of the day, including, Dr Emily Stowe, Ontario Premier Oliver Mowat and Lady Aberdeen, to force legislation that would allow women as barristers.  In 1897 she became the 1st woman lawyer in the British Empire. Even though she was licensed she did not often enter court. Her presence in the court room caused too much of a ruckus. It would not be until the middle of the century that women would be able to comfortably represent their profession in the courts.

1900's
Mabel Priscilla Penery French Born 1881. Died 1955. After graduating with distinction in law from King’s College in 1905 she petitioned to be admitted to the Bar in New Brunswick. She was originally denied because she was not, according to definition, a “person”. Applying pressure in various ways she became the 1st woman lawyer in New Brunswick. In 1907 New Brunswick passed a statute to permit women to be admitted to the legal profession. By 1910 Mabel had resettled in British Columbia and was again applying for admittance to the Bar. Once again the provincial law association declared that she was not a “Person” and therefore could not be admitted to the Bar in the province of British Columbia. Once again pressure was applied, mainly from womens groups in the province and in February Attorney –General William Bowser bowed to pressure and introduced An Act to Remove the Disability of Women So Far as Relates to the Study and Practice of Law. The Act passed with unanimous support in the provincial Legislature. Mabel French became the 1st woman lawyer admitted to the Bar in British Columbia. Source: Women Lawyers in British Columbia by W. Wesley Pue. Online (Accessed March 2014)
 
1910's
Annie Langstaff Born 1887, Alexandria, Ontario. Died June 29, 1975, Montreal, Quebec. Her husband deserted her and disappeared leaving her to raise their daughter as a single parent. In 1914-15 she was the 1st woman in Quebec to receive a degree in Law, from McGill University. At this time, by provincial law no woman could engage in professional businesses without the permission from her husband. Since her husband was not around it was not possible for her to apply to be called to the Bar in Quebec. She would continue to push to become a lawyer but it was not until April 29, 1941 that the Bar Act was changed to allow women to the Bar. On January 10, 1942 four women were the 1st to be called to the Bar in Quebec. Annie herself never was admitted to the Bar. She wrote articles on family law for popular women’s journals but never practiced the profession for which she had fought. Sources: McGill women raising the bar by Pascal Zamprelli, McGill Reporter Vol. 39. No. 12, March 1, 2007 : The Canadian Encyclopedia Online accessed June 2013.
 
Mary McNulty Born 1895 , Ottawa, Ontario. Died May 2, 1972. At 16, she and a friend founded the Equal Franchise Association, working to achieve the vote for women. Mary went on to study Law and was the 1st woman on the debating team at Osgoode Hall Law School. She was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1918. She became the 1st woman to practice law in the city of Ottawa. She was however disillusioned when she did not receive worthwhile cases and she opened the Cloverleaf Dress ship and went on to be a retail buyer of clothing for a large Department store. The second woman lawyer in Ottawa arrived only in 1950. She married Albert Alphonse Fix in 1931. After her husband’s death in 1945 Mary began to show an interest in politics. She was an alderman in the Township of Toronto and in 1953 served as Deputy Reeve, then acting Reeve and from 1955 through 1958 she served as Mayor. In 1959 she became Warden of Peel County only to return to run successfully as Reeve in 1961. A park named in her honour was established in what is now Mississauga. Mary was also a founding member of the Toronto Township Historical Society, now Mississauga Heritage Foundation.   Source: Diversifying the bar; Law Society of Upper Canada online accessed January 2013.:: Heritagemississauga.ca/page/mary-fix. Accessed March 2003.
 
Frances Lillian Fish Born December 1888, Newcastle, New Brunswick. Died 1975. She studied at the University of New Brunswick and earned her B.A. in 1910. At school she enjoyed an active life that included basketball and ice hockey. She obtained her teaching license teaching 1911/12 in Winnipeg where she did not enjoy good health. She returned to New Brunswick teaching for another three years. During this time she also earned in 1913 her M.A. from the University of Chicago. She thought of doing a PhD but did not complete the program. On September 10, 1918 she was the 1st woman to graduate Dalhousie University with a Law Degree. And she was the first woman called to the Bar in Nova Scotia. She was the 7th woman in Canada to become a lawyer. Shortly after graduation she left the Maritimes working as a paralegal in Ottawa and later in Montreal. In February 1934 she was called to the Bar in her home province of New Brunswick and in June of that year she became the 1st woman to argue a case before the appeal Division of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick. New Brunswick woman were legislated the right to vote in 1919 but they were not allowed to run for a seat in the Legislature until 1934. The following year Frances Fish was the 1st woman to be elected to the New Brunswick Legislature. In 1947 she was New Brunswick’s 1st female County Deputy Magistrate.  Sources: New Brunswick Women’s History Accessed 2012. “Everyone called her Frank…” by Barry Cahill, Journal of New Brunswick Studies Vol. 2 2011 Online accessed June 2013.
 
1920's
Lida Bell Pearson Born June 7, 1895, Newmarket, Ontario. Died February 18, 1987, Preston, Ontario. Lida’s mother dies shortly after her birth and she was raised by her aunts until she was 11. She graduated from Victoria College, University of Toronto in 1918. She had enjoyed varsity sports, especially basketball and field hockey. She then studied law and was called to the bar in Ontario in 1921. On November 3, 1921 she was the 1st woman lawyer in Preston Ontario with her own practice. In 1927 she married Gerald Sturdy, a Preston draughtsman and sold her established law practice to Ruby Wigle. In 1933 she repurchased her law practice replacing Ruby as Town Solicitor. In 1935 she was the 1at woman to run for the position of School Trustee but was only successful with her second try for the office, serving from 1936-1945. She was Vice-Chair of the Board 1937-1936. She maintained her membership in the Galt Federation of University Women from 1954-1965. She supported her church women’s activities and in 1960 she became the 1st President of the United Church Women. In 1962 she was appointed Queen’s Council and continued her law practice until 1967. Source: City of Cambridge, Hall of Fame, Online Accessed March 2013.
 
Vera L. Parsons Born 1889. Died 1973. As a teenager she suffered from polio which resulted in her having to walk with a cane for the rest of her life. Vera was not one to let a small handicap keep her in the shadows of life. She earned her B.A. in modern languages from the University of Toronto and went to Bryn Maur in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. where she earned her master’s degree. She was fluent in Italian and attended the University of Rome, Italy but returned to Canada before she completed her doctorate. She worked with Italian immigrants in the Toronto area and soon found that they required more legal help. Vera decided to become a lawyer and after attending Osgoode Law School she was called to the Ontario Bar in 1924. Most women lawyers, and there were not many opted for real estate law but Vera had a keen interest in criminal law. She became the 1st woman to be a criminal defense lawyer in Ontario and the 1st woman lawyer to appear before a judge and jury in Canada. She became a partner in the law firm of Horkins, Graham and Parsons. In 1944 she became the 3rd woman in Ontario named to King’s Counsel. She was the 1st woman lawyer in Canada to defend an accused client charged with murder. She called for more probation officers to counter repeat offenders and she also pressed for more institutions like trade schools for rehabilitation of prisoners. In the 1930’s her private life allowed her to relax on an island cottage Temogami (formerly Timagami)  in northeastern Ontario. She enjoyed playing the piano , collecting art and travelling as well. She worked well into her 80’s before she retired. The Vera L. Parson Prize for criminal procedure is offered for the Ontario Bar admissions course. Source: Crossing the Bar: an exhibition at the Law Society of Upper Canada Museum 1993. Online accessed January 2013.  
 
Annie Epstein Baker Born 1908. Died 2005. Annie studied law and was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1929. Annie may have been the 1st Jewish woman called to the Bar in Ontario. Source Diversifying the Bar: Lawyers make history. Online Accessed May 2013.
 
Edith Louise Patterson Born 1891, Vancouver, British Columbia. Died 1980. Edith attend University in Montreal and Toronto and studied law to be called to the Bar in Ontario in 1915. She was one of the few women lawyers in the 1920’s she appeared in court in civil and divorce cases. In 1929 she was appointed a judge in the juvenile court and became the 1st woman to be a member of the  Law Society of British Columbia. She married Hamilton Read, her law partner of more than 20 years. She retired in 1970 after more than five decades in her profession. Source: Diversifying the bar; Law Society of Upper Canada online accessed January 2013.:
 
1930's
Ruth Mildred " Ruby" Wigle Born 1893, Manitoba.  Married Name Fish.  After her studies at law school she was called to the Ontario Bar in 1926. She purchased a law practice from Linda Bell Pearson Sturdy who had recently married and wished to join her husband who was working in Chicago. Ruby was a member of the Women’s law Association of Ontario. She would become one of the 1st women town solicitors in Ontario when she worked in Preston, Ontario 1931 to 1933. She later moved to Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, her home town, to work with her husband. Source: Diversifying the bar: Lawyers Make history. Law Society of Upper Canada Online accessed January 2013.
 

Helen Alice Kinnear . Born Cayuga, Ontario May 6, 1894. Died 1970. She graduated and was called to the Ontario bar, to become a lawyer, in 1920. She practiced law in Port Colborne, Ontario until 1943, when she was appointed county-court judge for Haldimand County. In 1947 she was appointed judge of the Juvenile Court. She was the 1st woman in the British Commonwealth to be created a Kings Counsel and the 1stin the Commonwealth appointed to a county-court bench and the 1st lawyer in Canada to appear as counsel before the Supreme Court in Canada in 1935. In 1993 the Canadian Post Office issued a commemorative stamp to honour the achievements of this woman Lawyer.In 1999, Kinnear House, Built by lawyer Louis Kinnear in 1904, situated at 232 Clarence Street, Port Colborne, Ontario, was added to the database of Heritage Port Colborne's Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee for the purpose of publicizing Kinnear's residence as a noteworthy local property.
 

Marion Ironquil Meadmore Born 1936 Peepeekisis First Nation Reserve, Saskatchewan. Like many of her generation she was forced to leave home and attend residential School. In 1954 she married Ronald Hector Meadmore (1933-2013). She attended the University of Manitoba and in 1977 she became the 1st indigenous woman lawyer in Canada. She is the founder of several aboriginal organizations including the Canadian Indian Lawyer Association (Now Indigenous Bar Association), National Indian Brotherhood, the Indian and Métis Friendship Center, the Kinew Housing, and the National Indigenous Council of Elders (NICE). In 1985 She was inducted into the Order of Canada. Since 2011 she has been actively involved on the National Council of Indigenous Elders for the Creation of Wealth Forum. In 2010 she was honoured at the Keeping the Fires Burning aboriginal awards celebrating female leaders for preserving First Nations culture and serving as role models for younger generations.  In 2015 the University of Manitoba presented her with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Source: Don Marks, “What is the Use in Spending so Much Time Studying Failure’ CBC.ca May 14, 2015;  Matt Preprost, “Gala recognizes accomplishments”.  Winnipeg Free Press June 18, 2010 Page A13.
 
1940's
Edra Isles Saunders Ferguson (née Saunders) Born 1907, St Thomas, Ontario. Died November 15, 2011, Toronto, Ontario. She did her undergraduate studies at Alma College and then attended law school in the 1920’s and was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1930. She joined her father’s law firm of Saunders & Ingrham. In 1936  she was elected as the town’s 1st woman alderman and  in December 1937 she ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of St Thomas. She married Donald Harvey Ferguson and the couple had two children. She was the 1st woman judge to be named to the Small Claims Court when it was established. From 1940-1943 she was volunteering with the National Council of Women of Canada leading the National Convention on laws concerning woman and children. Also in the 1940’s she initiated a Red Cross Clinic in Guelph, Ontario. She became the 1st woman president of the St Thomas Children’s Aid Society and the 1st woman appointed to the Senate of the University of Western Ontario. Many Toronto Lawyers new her affectionately as Ma Ferguson. In 2002 she received the Queen’s Jubilee Medal and in 2011 she was inducted into the Order of Canada, for her achievements in law, politics and her advocacy of women’s rights.  The University of Victoria offers the Edra Saunders Ferguson Scholarship in her honour Sources: Diversifying the bar; Law Society of Upper Canada online accessed January 2013. Obituary, St Thomas Times Journal November 2011.
 
Constance Garner-Short Born 1910, Montreal, Quebec. Died 1959. She attended McGill University, Montreal and obtained a law degree in 1934. As women were still not called to the Bar in the province of Quebec at this time she sought work as best she could. She worked for the Portuguese Consulate and at the beginning of World War ll she joined the Red Cross Transportation Service as a driver. On January 10, 1942 she was one of 4 women who the 1st called to the Bar in Quebec. The other women were Elizabeth Monk (1898-1980), Suzanne Raymond Filion and Marcelle Hémond-Lacoste. Constance was in 1947 the 1st woman to appear in the Quebec Court of Appeals. Source: The History of McMaster, Meighen (Law firm) by Doug Metchell and Judy Slinm. McGill-Queen’s Press 1989.
 
Marcelle Hémond-Lacoste Born 1877? On January 10 1942 she was one of 4 women who were the 1st women admitted to the Bar in the Province of Quebec.  In 1966 she retired after 60 years as President of the Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montreal. She was 89 years old when she retired.
 
Elizabeth Carmichael Monk Born August 4, 1898, Montreal, Quebec. Died December 26, 1980, Montreal, Quebec. In 1923 she earned a degree in Law from McGill University. She was the 1st woman to win the faculty’s gold medal for academic excellence. Unfortunately at the time she graduated women were not allowed to be called to the Bar in the province of Quebec. She would fight, cajole, and wait almost 20 years before she was called to the Bar. In 1934 she was admitted to the Bar in Nova Scotia but this was not home. On January 10, 1942, Elizabeth was one of 4 women to be the 1st women called to the Bar in Quebec. The other women were Constance Garner-short (1910-1959), Suzanne Raymond Filion and Marcelle Hémond-Lacoste. Elizabeth practiced corporate  and became the 1st Quebec woman appointed as Queen’s Counsel. She worked with the Montreal Citizen Committee, the Quebec National Federation of University women and Canadian Federation of University Women. In 1991 she was the recipient of the Méite du Barreau. Source: Les pionnières dans le métiers non-traditionnels (copyright 2004 by Sophie Lecerte and Karine Boisverts) Online. Accessed June 2013.
 
Olga Chumak Born, Toronto, Ontario 1919. Died 2003. She studied law and was called to the bar in Ontario in 1944 becoming the 1st woman lawyer of Ukrainian heritage in the province. In 1946 she married Doctor Martin Chepesiuk but did not give up her law practice. All her live she was an active advocate for Ukrainian culture and traditions. Source: Diversifying the bar: Lawyers makin history. Biographies of Early Exceptional Ontario Lawyers. Online Accessed January 2013.
 
Gretta Wong Grant Born July 31, 1921 London, Ontario. She was raised in London Ontario where her family were the only Chinese people in town. Her father believed that all his children, both boys and girls should get an education and study for the professions. Gretta argued with family members when she was young and they teased her saying that she should become a lawyer. Gretta earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Western Ontario before attending Osgoode Law School. She was called to the bar in Ontario in 1946 without knowing, nor really caring that she was the 1st Chinese Canadian woman to practice Law. Despite the discrimination against the Chinese in Toronto she was able to complete her articling at McCarthy and McCarthy where she reported to a family acquaintance Leighton McCarthy. December 9, 1950 she married a fellow lawyer James Alan R. Grant and the couple would have four children. Both families accepted the interracial marriage with little question. Gretta stayed at home much of the 1950’s raising her children but she maintained her membership in the Low Society of Upper Canada. She also kept up to date by working with her husband when he brought work home. Late in the 1950’s she took a job as a City Solicitor in London. In the 1960’s she founded the Middlesex [county] Women’s Law Association. From 1967 through 1988 she worked in London’s first Legal Aid Office. She did spend one year away from London working as the Area Director of the York County Legal Aid Society. She was the 1st woman trustee of the Middlesex Law Association and served as president in 1981. After retirement she served as director of the London office of the Chinese – Canadian Council. In 1989 she was working with the City of London Race Relations Advisory Committee. Sources: Crossing the Bar :an exhibition of the Law Society of Upper Canada Museum, 1993. Online Accessed January 2013; Gretta Wong Grant, Canada’s first Chinese-Canadian female Lawyer by Constance Backhouse. Online Accessed January 2013.; Road to Justice: the legal struggle for equal rights for Chinese Canadians. Online Accessed January 2013.
 
1950's
Stella Avura Panarites  Born 1924, Cobalt, Ontario Died 1986. Stella earned her B.A. from Queen’s University in 1949. She studied law and was called to the Bar in 1953. She was the 1st woman lawyer of Greek heritage to be called to the Bar in Ontario. She practiced law in Orillia, Midland, Gravenhurst and North Bay, Ontario.  She was a member of the Hellenic Canadian Lawyers Association. Source: Diversifying the bar: Lawyers Make history. Law Society of Upper Canada Online
 
1970's
Constance R. Glube (née Lepofky). Born Ottawa, Ontario November 23, 1931. Died February 15, 2016, Halifax, Nova Scotia.  In 1952 she earned her BA at McGill University, Montreal and married Richard Glube. The couple would have 4 children. By 1955 she had graduated in law at Dalhousie University and entered the Bar of Nova Scotia. In 1974 she became the Manager of the City of Halifax, the 1st woman in Canada to hold such a position. In 1977 she received the Award of Merit from a grateful City of Halifax. September 21, 1977 she was appointed In 1982 she was appointed 21st Chief Justice of Nova Scotia and in 1998 Chief Justice of the Court of Appeal of Nova Scotia, once again being the 1st woman in Canada to be appointed to such a position, retiring in 2004. She is a judicial leader and mentor who has the admiration and respect of her peers. She has been active in judicial education and court administration. She has graciously served on various and numerous professional and volunteer boards and committees at local, provincial and national levels. Accolades for her services have included: The Canada 125 Medal, 1992; the Frances Fish Award, a women lawyers Achievement Award, 1997; The Queen’s Golden Jubilee Award, 2002; the International Honours Society Golden Key Award, 2003; numerous honourary doctorate degrees from universities; Honourary member of the Canadian Bar Association, 2004; the Order of Nova Scotia 2005 and the Order of Canada , 2006. Suggested sources: Protocol Office, Order of Nova Scotia Recipients Http://www.gov.ns.ca/frot/2005recipients.htm (Accessed August 2008; Canadian Who’s Who . Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006.
 
Jaunita Westmoreland-Traoré. Born March 10, 1942, Verdun (now part of Montréal), Québec. She attended the Université to obtain her law degree in 1966. She earned her PhD at the University of Paris, France. In 1967 she was called to the Bar in Ontario and in 1969 called to the Bar in Québec. In the early 1970’s she became the 1st Black woman to teach at the Université de Montréal and from 1976-1991 she taught at the Université du Québec à Montréal. From 1983-1985 she was Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission. In 1991 she was appointed an officer of the National Order of Quebec.  In 1999 she became the 1st Black judge appointed in Québec. She became the 1st Black Dean of a Canadian Law school when she served at the Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, Ontario. In 2005 she was presented with the Touchtone Award by the Canadian Bar Association. In 2008 she was awarded the Quebec Human Rights Commission’s Rights and Liberties Prize for her career long fight against discrimination and in 2009 she earned the Christine Tourigny Merit Award. In 2013 a bursary was implemented with her name by the Faculty of Political Science and Law, Université du Québec, Montréal. Sources : “Judge Westmorland-Traoré to be honoured.” The Gazette, Montreal, November 2008. : Diversifying the Bar: Lawyers make history Online (Accessed December 2013) : “Legal Icon –Westmoreland-Traoré Retires”  by Patricia DeGuire. Voices, Ontario Bar Association Vol.  18 no. 2 May 2012
 
Bertha Wilson. née Wernham.  Born September 18, 1923 Kirkcaldy, Scotland.  Died April 28, 2007, Ottawa, Ontario. She graduated with a Master of Arts from the University of Aberdeen in 1944. In 1945 she married John Wilson, a Presbyterian minister, who served as minister to the United Church in Renfrew, Ontario. When John became a naval chaplain during the Korean War she was working as a dental receptionist in Ottawa. In she settled with John who had been posted to Halifax, Nova Scotia.  In 1954 she entered Dalhousie Law School, Halifax and was called to the nova Scotia Bar in 1957. Relocating to Toronto, she was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1959 and specialized in legal research and opinion writing for other lawyers.  She was the 1st woman appointed to the Ontario Court of Appeal in 1975 where she became known for her “imaginative and humane decisions”. In 1982 she was the 1st woman appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada. In 1988 she was appointed a commissioner on the Reasmus-Dussault Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. In 1991 she was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1992 she was named to the Order of Canada. Sources: Bertha Wilson biography, Supreme Court of Canada Accessed 2008; Obituary, the Globe and Mail April 30, 2007. Accessed 2008
 
Marion Ironquil Meadmore. Born 1936 Peepeekisis First Nation Reserve, Saskatchewan. Like many of her generation she was forced to leave home and attend residential School. In 1954 she married Ronald Hector Meadmore (1933-2013). She attended the University of Manitoba and in 1977 she became the 1st indigenous woman lawyer in Canada. She is the founder of several aboriginal organizations including the Canadian Indian Lawyer Association (Now Indigenous Bar Association), National Indian Brotherhood, the Indian and Métis Friendship Center, the Kinew Housing, and the National Indigenous Council of Elders (NICE). In 1985 She was inducted into the Order of Canada. Since 2011 she has been actively involved on the National Council of Indigenous Elders for the Creation of Wealth Forum. In 2010 she was honoured at the Keeping the Fires Burning aboriginal awards celebrating female leaders for preserving First Nations culture and serving as role models for younger generations.  In 2015 the University of Manitoba presented her with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Source: Don Marks, “What is the Use in Spending so Much Time Studying Failure’ CBC.ca May 14, 2015; Matt Preprost, “Gala recognizes accomplishments”.  Winnipeg Free Press June 18, 2010 Page A13.
 
1980's
Helen R. Pierce Born 1953. Helen earned a B.A. degree in social work before she studied law. She was called to the Ontario Bar in 1982. She practiced in Sault Ste Marie from 1982 until 2001. In 2000 she was appointed Regional Senior Judge of the Northwest Region. She was appointed to the Supreme Court of Justice at Thunder Bay, Ontario in 2001 and may be the 1st Métis lawyer to become a judge in Ontario. She is active in continuing legal education and in a variety of legal organizations, including the Advocates’ Society, the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice, The Ontario Association of Superior Court Judges and the Canadian Superior Court Judges Association. She is also the Honorary Colonel of the Lake Superior Scottish Regiment. Source: Diversifying the bar: Lawyers Make history. Law Society of Upper Canada Online
 
Susan Ursel Born 1958. After undergraduate studies she attended Osgoode Law School, York University, Toronto and was called to the Bar in Ontario 1986 Susan is the 1st openly Lesbian lawyer in Ontario. She appeared as council for the Metropolitan Community Church v. Egan which was the first Supreme Court decision on equality rights for gay men and lesbians. She is the founder of Pro Bono Law Ontario, an organization that encourages lawyers to provide pro bono legal services (charge no fees) to low income persons. In 1998 she received the Canadian Bar Association Young Lawyers Pro Bono Award. She has served the Lesbian and Gay community and in 2000 they recognized this service by inducting her into the Canadian Gay and Lesbian Archives’ National Portrait Collection. In 2011 she won the Canadian Bar Association HERO Award in recognition of her contribution to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Committee. Source: Diversifying the bar; Law Society of Upper Canada online accessed January 2013.:
 
1990's
Micheline Rawlins Born 1951, Montreal, Quebec. After graduating with a B.A. from McGill University, Montreal, she studied law at the University of Windsor in Ontario,  graduating in 1978. She was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1982. Back in Windsor she served  from 1985-1987 and again in 1995-2004 on the Board of Governors at the University of Windsor. She also volunteered with the Windsor Media Council, the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides and was president of the Windsor Urban Alliance, the Chatham Youth Soccer Association and with Distinguished Women in International Services. The Honorable Madam Justice Rawlins was the 1st Black woman appointed the bench in Ontario in 1992. In 1997 she received the African Canadian Achievement Award and in 2002 The National Congress of Black Women Award for Outstanding Contribution to Women, to Law and to Canada. In 2004 she was named Windsor Woman of the Year. She considers her two sons as her greatest achievement. . Source: Diversifying the bar; Law Society of Upper Canada online accessed January 2013.:
 
2000's
Marie E. "Tracy" O'Donnell Born 1966 Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. She studied law and was called to the bar in Ontario in 1995. Tracey is a member of the Red Rock Indian Band, located southeast of Thunder Bay, Ontario. She has focused her career on providing legal services and support to First Nations, Aboriginal organizations and Aboriginal peoples in several areas. She has volunteered on several boards of directors for Aboriginal based organizations. In 2003 she was elected a  bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the 1st aboriginal woman ever elected. She has two daughters and a son. Source: Diversifying the bar: Lawyers Make history. Law Society of Upper Canada Online
 

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