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In a category of their own...

June Bradley
Born Unity Saskatchewan. June is married an RCMP officer and the couple had 4 children. She has always enjoyed sports and she played women’s softball for the Saskatoon Pats from 1936 to 1944. She held the position of first base in the 1944 provincial championships when the game ran for 23 innings. The game was halted to allow exhausted players to eat before playing an evening follow-up. They lost the game by one run. With her husband serving with the RCMP the family moved often. With each move June became involved in her community. In Cumberland House, Saskatchewan she began a women’s organization. In Prince Albert, Saskatchewan she began a real estate career. With the death of her husband in 1964 she settled the family in Saskatoon where she opened Acton Real Estate Ltd., the 1st all-women real estate firm in the province. In 1976 she began to play golf. She has participated in several Canada 55Plus games where she has earned one gold, 2 silver and a bronze in the 85 Plus age category. June is also involved in the Royal Canadian Legion and the RCMP Veteran’s Association and Museum. Not one to be held back on any count June has worn a bright red Santa costume for the Royal Purple of Canada for 20 years. Source: Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2010.

Rachelle Halpenny   sports
Born November 9, 1950, Ironside, Quebec. Died January 10, 2012, Ottawa, Ontario. When she was 9 months old she suffered high fevers and she became severely handicapped with Cerebral Palsy. Her parents were told she would never walk nor talk. The family moved to Ottawa and Rachelle underwent numerous operations, post operative physiotherapy and speech therapy. She was totally bilingual and loved to participate in good conversation. She graduated from Algonquin College with a diploma in Recreation. She walked with crutches and later enjoyed a motorized scooter to get out and about. In 1973 she married Jim Halpenny. The doctors told her not to have children but Rachelle wanted a family and the couple had two sons. In 1976 she began to participate in handicapped games. She was often the only woman in the field competing against men.  In 1978 she participated in the 4th international Cerebral Palsy Games winning 3 gold and 2 bronze medals for Canada. At the next Games in 1982 she returned home with 2 gold, a silver and a bronze. During her sports career she participated in archery, club throw, rifle and pistol shooting, Table tennis, weight lifting, track events, sailing and soccer. In 1987 a thanks to a neighbour  Rachelle met Rick Hanson on his Man in Motion Tour. Rachelle worked  at many jobs, often of her own making. She ran a swim program for the YM /YWCA, worked with Canadian Veterans Affairs and coached at the University of Ottawa. She also served as Vice Chair for Cerebral Palsy Sports.   In 2006 at the Ottawa annual sports award dinner she received an individual award for sailing. She was an advocate for disabled accessibility to buildings and a modest pioneer for all who desired to achieve as individuals because they can.
Sources: “Life Story” by Joanne Lovett Potter, Ottawa Citizen February 2, 2013. ; “Rachelle Halpenny: A woman first, an athlete second and way at the other end of the scale, disabled” by Lyse Blanchard in Canadian Woman Studies Spring 1983; Personal friendship.   
 

Ivy Eastwood Granstrom Born September 28, 1911 Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Died April 14,2004 Vancouver, British Columbia. Ivy moved with her family to British Columbia in 1917. At 12 years of age she was working at cooking, cleaning and waitressing. She began training as a nurse when her weak eyesight was noticed. She had been born with extremely limited vision which worsened in the 1950’s. She was in a car accident in the 1960’s and doctors told her she would have to live life in a wheelchair. Ivy would have none of this and she started on her own rehabilitation and was soon walking , then jogging and running. She participated in Blind Sports competitions and enjoyed herself. In the 1980’s she was competing in the Canadian Master’s Association events and entering in North American and international races. In 1982 she was British Columbia’s Sports Athlete of the year and in 1989 she was inducted into the Order of Canada.  She often set records up to 2001. She was a top world –class master (over 50 years old) runner who competed in open competitions with sighted competitors. She held 12 unchallenged world records when she retired. She earned many awards including the British Columbia Eugene Reimer Award for disabled Athletes. She was also inducted into the Terry Fox Hall of Fame. She earned the title “Queen of the Polar Bears” for her love of participating in the annual Polar Bear Dip. On January 1, 2004 at 92 years of age she took her 76th annual Polar Bear swim!
Carol Anne Letheren. née Wood. Born 1942 Guelph, Ontario.  Died February 1, 2001 Toronto, Ontario. In the 1950’s she was an Ontario intercollegiate badminton champion. After earning he Bachelor degree in Physical Education from the University of Toronto (UofT) in 1963 and her BA from UofT in 1969 Carol Anne graduated from Schulich School of Business, York University, Toronto, Ontario with a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA). She would later  serve. as president of the international Alumni Association of the school. She married Michael Letheren and the couple had one son. She would be a staunch supporter of York University serving as a member of the Alumni Association Board of Directors. She was an associate Professor and coordinator of Undergraduate Studies at York University as well as an associate professor at UofT. Working for the Canadian government she was Executive Producer, Pilot Television and Business of Sport. She coached and worked as an international official in gymnastics, synchronized swimming and volleyball and was Official of the Year from Air Canada.  In 1988 she was the 1st woman appointed Chef de Mission for the Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea. These were the games where Ben Johnson tested positive for drugs and was stripped of his gold medal. She was a member of the International Olympic Committee since 1990.  In 1994 she became the 1st woman to be president of the Canadian Olympic Association (COA). She won the McCain’s Volunteer of the Year Award, , was made a Lifetime Honorary Member of the International and Canadian Gymnastics Federation, earned the YM / WCA Woman of Distinction Award, the York University Public Contribution Award and is a member of the UofT Sports Hall of Fame. In 2001 she received the Bruce Bryden Alumni Recognition Award and received the Canadian Olympic Order. . In 2002 the COA created the Carol Anne Letheren Leadership and sport Scholarship in her memory. In 2010 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame.
 
Archery     back
Lisa Bertoncini

She has been on target with her sport of archery since she competed for her school, Mohawk College, Hamilton, Ontario, winning gold medals at the provincial level in both the individual and team competitions in 1977 and 1978. She was Female Athlete of the year twice and won the outstanding Dr. Mitminger Award from Mohawk College in 1978. She is also a member of The Mohawk College Sports Hall of Fame. At the Ontario Association of Archers she won 4 women's  Ontario Championship titles in 1977, 1983, 1984 and 1985. She competed at the national level for nine years and won the women’s Canadian Championship title in 1984 and 1985. Representing Canada at the World field Championships Lisa took the Women’s World Champion title in both 1984 and the World Games title in 1985. She was named to the Canadian Amateur Sports Hall of Fame in 1985. She has done some coaching at the national level of the sport since leaving the competitive field..
 

Violet Alice Lovelace née Zasko. Born August 28, 1936 Jedburgh, Saskatchewan. Died February 27, 2018 Sun City, Arizona, U.S.A couple had three children. Violet was born in Jedburgh, SK on August 28, 1936. Her family moved to Yorkton when she was four years old, where she attended elementary school and Yorkton Collegiate for high school. In her youth she was involved with the United Church Youth Club and C.G.I.T and eventually became troop leader. Violet earned her teaching degree at Moose Jaw Teacher's College in 1955. Violet married Atley Lovelace on July 14, 1956 in Yorkton, where they made their home until 1960, when they moved to Pilot Butte, Saskatchewan. The couple had three children.  In 1972 they moved to a quarter section of land just east of Regina on Highway #1, where they lived and set up their archery business. Violet had been introduced to Club archery in 1958 and in 1966 she was instrumental in starting up and running Golden Arrow Archery. Violet was an avid competitive archer and earned a large number of trophies. She taught elementary school at Burke School in Yorkton and Pilot Butte Elementary School. After school she also gave archery lessons sold and set up equipment and made custom arrows for local archers. In 1974, Violet retired from teaching to work full-time in their archery business. In 1996 they built a lodge north of Norquay, where they spent their summers and ran an outfitting business. Violet loved to spend the winter in Arizona since 2001. A hard working individual she always wanted to make sure everyone was happy and made everyone feel like part of the family.
 
Lucille Lessard. Born May 26,1957 Quebec City, Quebec.  Introduced to the sport of archery by her schoolteachers she became a devoted competitor. In 1972 she was the Canadian junior Champion in Outdoor Field Archery followed in 1973 with winning the National Target Outdoor Junior Championship.  She won her 1st National Outdoor Senior Championship in 1974 at just 17 years of age and successfully defended her title in 1975 and 1980.  In 1974 she became the 1st Canadian to win the World Field Archery Championships, she was the youngest world Champion in Archery up to this point in time in time. Field archery means competitor face targets at unknown distances on varied terrain. That same year she was top female athlete in Quebec and winning the Elaine Tanner Award as Canada's Junior Athlete of the Tear.  She also won the Canadian National Indoor championship in 1975 and 1976. In 1977 she was inducted into Canada's Sport Hall of Fame.  She won a spot on the Canadian team for the 1980 Olympics but Canada boycotted the Moscow games.
 
Dorothy Lidstone. Born August 16, 1938. She enjoyed learning her sport of archery. She excelled and became the first Canadian World Champion in Archery in 1969. Her winning score broke the previous record set in 1963 by 100 points. Dorothy has retired from competitive archery but was an active support in setting up the family archery business that included designing, developing, and manufacturing Canadian made archery equipment.
 
Margery 'Marg' Saunders Born March 10, 1913, British Columbia. Died November 26, 2010, Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Marge was a humble and private individual and not much is written about her early life. As a young woman she enjoyed cycling. In the 1930’s she took to competitive bike riding. In 1937 she entered the annual race, seven miles, around Stanley Park in Vancouver. The country was still suffering from the depression and an automobile was a real luxury. Not having a car, Marge simply peddled the 30 miles to Vancouver, won the race and cycled 30 miles back home. That same year, with depression time jobs being scarce, Marge mailed off her clothing and took to her trusty one speed bicycle, traveling 6 days to pick apples in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley. In 1938 she took up rifle shooting. In 1942 she won a Dominion Marksman Expert Shield scoring 5,933 out of 6,000 points. Enlisting in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War ll, Marge served as a radio operator in Prince Rupert, British Columbia. After the war Marge began working at Brown Brothers Greenhouses where gardening would become a lifelong avocation even long after retiring. It was after the war that Marge took an interest in the sport of archery. She was one of the founders of the Maple Ridge Archery Club and she personally honed her shooting skills to become one of Canada’s top female archers. She earned a berth on the 1972 Olympic Canadian Archery team going to Munich, Germany. At 59 she was one of the oldest competitors in the games. When asked how she did in the games she would smile and say well I did not come last. Indeed she shot her personal best to that point and earning a F.I.T.A. STAR from the Federation International de Tir a L’arc! Marge continued shooting, supporting her club and coaching in her beloved sport until she retired from the sport at the age of 92. She continued gardening right up until her death. Her Olympic archery equipment and other memorabilia are with the Maple Ridge Museum. Source: A sincere thank you to the Maple Ridge Museum staff for providing information that filled out my personal information about my archery shooting colleague. : Obituary, Vancouver Sun, December, 4, 2010; Mike Lacelle ‘A Wonderful Life, Remarkable Woman’ in Maple Ridge News, December 17, 2010; Mathew Shields,  Peddling After Marge. Maple Ridge Museum.
 
Badminton      back
Claire Backhouse-Sharpe née Backhoiuse. In 1978 she participated in her 1st Commonwealth Games winning two silver medals and that same year she took two gold medals at the Pan American Championships. In the 1982 Commonwealth Games she took a gold and a silver medal followed by a silver at the 1986 Games and a silver at the 1990 Games in Auckland, New Zealand . She is the 1st Canadian female athlete to compete in five Commonwealth Games. In 1985 she married Doug Sharpe and the couple has three children.  She juggled her family life with her sport life and won 15 National Championships and an eight-time U.S. Open winner. She was Badminton Canada’s Athlete of the Year in 1994.  In 1997 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. A true ambassador for women in sport she promoted her sport with motivational speaking and establishing a new badminton development center at the Commonwealth Center for Sport Development, now PacificSport, Victoria, British Columbia.
 
Wendy May Clarkson-Carter née Clarkson Born March 11 1956, Glasgow, Scotland. While attending high school in Bowmanville, Ontario she was recognized for her athletic abilities in swimming, badminton and basketball as Athlete of the Year. .  Living in Western Canada in the 1970’s Wendy took up the sport of Badminton.  She won the 1975 Canadian junior badminton singles title, with Tracey Vanwassenhove, she won the junior girl’s doubles competition and with Cam Dalgleish she won the mixed doubles. In 1976 she won the Canadian Ladies Singles title. In 1977 she won the Badminton Pan Am Championship. In 1978 at the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta and she won silver in the team competition and bronze in the Ladies’ singles. In 1978 she was ranked as 3rd best female badminton player in the world. She took top ladies singles at the nationals in 1979, 1980 and with Claire Backhouse she too top Doubles and with Greg Carter top mixed doubles. In 1981 she won gold in Ladies Doubles with Sandra Skillings.  In 1982 she earned top Doubles with Bob MacDougal and top ladies doubles with Sandra Skillings. Wendy studied at the University of Calgary earning a Bachelor of Education in 1989. In 2001 she was inducted into the University of Alberta’s Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Milaine Clouthier.  Born February 16, 1972 Granby, Quebec.  Her brother brought her to a badminton game when she was 9. She was told that girls couldn't beat guys.  That did it! She was hooked! She outplayed them all! In 1990 she relocated to Calgary, Alberta where she learned English becoming bilingual. By 1995 she had won a bronze medal in the Pan American Games, and in 1997 and 1999 she won Pan Am gold in the doubles event. She earned a silver in Mixed doubles at the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney. After the Commonwealth Games, Manchester England in 2002 she retired from competition.
 
Esme F. Coke Not much information is available on Esme. She played badminton out of Toronto and in the 1920's was a force to be reconded with in her sport. She held Ontario Provincial titles and women's National Singles Championships from 1924 through 1926 as well as 1928-1929. She also held the Women's doubles Badminton championship title 1924 through 1928. She was also the mixed doubles national champion in 1925. IF YOU HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT MRS. ESME F. COLE PLEASE DO LET ME KNOW.
 
Lesley Elizabeth Harris Born October 18, 1954, Kuala Lumpur, Malaya. Lesley studied at McGill University, Montreal. In 1971 she earned a bronze medal in ladies single competition at the Canada Winter Games. That same year, playing tennis, she and her team mate Mila Zaruba won girls-18 Canadian DOUBLES.  In 1973-74 she held Canadian junior singles, doubles badminton titles. She was a finalist in Canadian ladies in 1975. In 1977 she represented Canada at the International Badminton Federation World Championships. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Robbyn Hermitage Born April 22, 1970 Montreal, Quebec. A badminton player of talent, Robbyn has 10 national badminton championship titles to her credit. She has twice represented Canada on teams at both the Commonwealth Games and the Pan American Games. She was also a part of team Canada at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. Currently she lives in London , Ontario where she is caring for her family of two toddlers. Watch for her in the future on the courts though, for she intends to get re-involved once again in the sport that has given her so much!.
 
Denyse Julien Born June 22, 1960 Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec.  Her passion is badminton. She has been enthusiastic about her sport since she was 12 years old.  She represented Canada on the Olympic team in 1992, 1996 and 2004. She was Badminton's Athlete of the year in 1995. She won 3 gold medals in the Pan American Games.  She has held several Canadian National title over the years but feels her biggest accomplishment is still being enthusiastic about her sport. Between 1981 and 2004 she won a record 31 Canadian National Championship events in singles, doubles and mixed doubles. She earned four individual medals at Commonwealth Games in 1986, 1990 she won silver,  and 1990 & 1994 she won bronze medals. Internationally she took the singles event in France 1982, the Welsh championship titles in 1991 and 1995 and 1983 she won gold at the Austrian International and then the Portugal Open in 1998. From 2004 through 2015 she was chief professional trainer for the Quebec  badminton team. She has also worked with Canada's National Coaching Program.
 
Anna Kier-Patrick née Kier. Not much information is know about Anna other than in the 1930's she was a force to be reconed with in her sport of Badminton. Women's singles national champion in badminton 1932, 1934, 1936, and 1937. She also took the doubles national championship in 1937 and won in mixed doubles national competition in 1932, 1934,1936 and 1937. IF YOU HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT ANNA KIER PATRICK PLEASE LET ME KNOW.
 
Jennifer Yiu Yiu Lee

Born Hong Kong. Jennifer began playing badminton at the age of 11. She held a position on the Hong Kong Badminton Team until immigrating to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1985. In 1987 she had relocated to Toronto. After a major injury in 1993, Jennifer became a badminton coach, dedicating herself to developing great players. In 1995, she established Lee’s Badminton Training Centre. She holds a Level 3 National Coach Certification and is working towards an Advanced Coaching Diploma at the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario. Jennifer has developed numerous students who have won places on the winner’s podiums. Jennifer volunteers in many schools to promote the sport to a wider audience. In 2015 she was presented with the Coach of the Year from the Toronto Sport Hall of Honour

Jean Miller née House. Born 1922. Died February 23, 1922 Waterloo, Ontario. Jean married Vern Miller (died 2008) with three children. She was active in her United Church Women's group. She enjoyed playing tennis but it was badminton where she showed her worth. She won the women's single national championship in 1956, 1958 and again in 1964. In Women's doubles she was the Canadian open champion in 1958, 1964 and 1865. Om 1060/61 she won the mixed open doubles championship with Finn Kobbero (1936-2009) a Danish champion in his own right. In her later life she enjoyed playing senior baseball. The silver tray that she and Finn won in 1961 was located in a junk shop in 2009.
 
Marjory Shedd. Born March 17, 1926. Marjory won her first Canadian Badminton Championship in 1953. In total she has won 6 national singles titles, 5 mixed and 14 ladies doubles titles. She also excels in volleyball and basketball. She flexed her coaching skills when she was coach to the University of Toronto volleyball team. 
 
Dorothy Louise Walton. née McKenzie. Born August 7, 1909 Swift Current, Saskatchewan. Died October 17, 1981.  Prior to 1932 she was a top ranked tennis player in Canada. After 1932 she switched to Badminton and became one of Canada’s best. After conquering the provincial and national titles in Canada she captured the All-England title that is equivalent to the world amateur championship. In 1950 she was voted one of the top 6 women athletes in Canada in the Canadian Press Poll. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. In the 1950's she was a well known member of the Consumers Association of Canada.
 
Margaret Eileen Stuart Underhill
 

née George. Born April 1, 1889, Moosomin, Saskatchewan. Died July 31, 1988, Vancouver, British Columbia She moved to Vancouver in 1910.  She dominated her sport of badminton from 1927-36. With her husband, Jack Underhill (1902 – 1974) she won National Doubles Championship for three consecutive years. They were five times B.C. mixed doubles champions 1928-31, 1935. The couple were the first husband-and-wife team in the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.Sources: British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame: Vancouver Hall of Fame online (accessed November 2012)
 

Dorothy Louise Walton née McKenzie. Born August 7, 1909 Swift Current, Saskatchewan. Died October 17, 1981 Toronto, Ontario. Between 1936 and 1940 she won 64 open doubles  and singles Badminton championships at national, Ontario and New England ,U.S.A. badminton competitions. She was also ranked 6th on the tennis circuit.  In 1939 she became the only Canadian ever to win the All England Open Badminton Championships.1939-1940 she won all seven major singles badminton titles in North America.  Dorothy retired from completion in the 1940's.  She was a founding member of the Consumers' Association of Canada serving as President from 1950-1953. From1957 through 1960  she was the captain and manager of the Canadian Uber Cup Badminton Team. In 1961 she was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame and in 1966 she became a member of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame. In 1971 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame and in 1973 she was inducted into the Order of Canada.
 
Jane Marie Youngberg Born Alysbury, England. December 25, 1948.She studied for her Bachelor of Education at the University of British Columbia and followed her heart to become a teacher. As a teen she loved badminton and at 15, with her partner Sue Latournier won the 1965 Doubles title. In 1967-8 she and Barbara Nash won the Canadian Ladies Junior Doubles championship.  And she and Barb Welsh took Canadian Ladies open and closed doubles championships in 1974 & 1975. On the international scene there were wins at the Canadian Uber Cup, Jakarta Indonesia 1972, 1975 and won at the Commonwealth Games , the all-England singles in 1977.  She continues to love teaching. She and her husband Ed spent three months in 2005 in Africa with the African Canadian Continuing Education Society ( acceskenya.org) training staff to better education of children of Kenya.
 
Baseball  
Flora Velma Abbott Born May 29, 1929 (sometimes reported as 1924) Regina, Saskatchewan. Died January 1, 1987, Regina, Saskatchewan. Velma enjoyed playing baseball and played in California, U.S.A. with the Alameda Girls when the team twice won the “World Championships” in amateur softball. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League in 1946. She played various positions for several teams, the Fort Wayne Daises, the Kenosha Comets, the Peoria Redwings and the Rockford Peaches. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Mary "Bonnie" Baker

née Mary Geraldine George. Born July 10, 1919.  Died December 2003. As a youth she enjoyed sports. At 13 she started playing softball with the local minor league team. In 1943 she was working at the Army and Navy store in Regina and playing ball for the store sponsored A&N Bombers baseball team. During Second World War with many of the American Professional Baseball players serving at the front lines, Wrigley, of the famous chewing Gum company, came up with the idea of having a girls league in baseball to fill the stadiums with fans. The All American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) was born. “Bonnie” was soon scouted for the All American Girls Baseball League and became the 1st of 64 Canadian women to sign up with the League.  A popular player with the press she appeared on the TV Show What’s My Line and was photographed for Life magazine in 1945. The press dubbed her “Pretty Bonnie Baker”. In 1950 she was with the Kalamazoo Lassies as the 1st player/manager in the League. In 1951 she took off the season to give birth to her daughter, Maureen. She returned to the sport in 1952 but soon retired to spend more time with her family. During her career she would play 930 regular season games and 18 playoff games. She was named the League's all-star catcher. Not only a good catcher she stole 506 bases when she was up to bat. The League itself folded in 1954. She returned home to Regina and continued to play softball and helped take the local team to the 1953 Ladies World Softball Championships in Toronto. She became involved in the Wheat City Curling Club where she would become club manager. In 1964-1965 she became Canada's 1st female sports caster on CKRM Radio in Regina. On June 22, 1985 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame. In 1992 the movie A League of Their Own told the AAGBL story with Geena Davis playing the main role based on the Bonnie Baker.  Mourners at her funeral celebrated her life and career by singing “Take me out to the ball game.”! August 8, 2015 a mural dedicated to Mary was unveiled in Central Park Regina. In 2018 she was inducted into the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame.
 

Mary Doris 'Dodie' Barr Born August 26,1921 Starbuck, Manitoba. Died July 12, 2009 Winnipeg, Manitoba., she started her baseball career in 1937 when she was discovered by scouts while playing catch with her sister. This led to positions as a powerful, left-handed pitcher with the Winnipeg Ramblers (1938-1939) and the Regina Army and Navy Bombers (1940-1942). She went on to a nine-year career with six teams in the American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGBL), from 1943 to 1950. She was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame ,Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A., the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, and the Manitoba Softball Hall of Fame. She retired in 1950 and became an accountant at Grace Hospital in Winnipeg, later working in the accounting department at the Health Sciences Centre.  Sources:  “Baseball pitcher captivated league while men fought war” Winnipeg Free Press, 17 July 2009; Memorable Manitobans, Profile by Gordon Goldsborough (Accessed December 2011).
 
Christine Lorna Beckett
née Jewett. Born August 3, 1926, Regina Saskatchewan. Died April 24, 2018 Stewart Valley, Saskatchewan. She played softball with the Regina Army and Navy Bombers when she was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1948 she played with the Kenosha Comets and the Peoria Redwings, with whom she remained for the following season. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. Christine Married Gordon Beckett (died 2006) and the couple had 2 children. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Sources:  AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Catherine Bennett Born September 4, 1920, Regina Saskatchewan. Catherine enjoyed playing baseball and was scouted for the All American Girls Baseball League in 1942. She played with the Kenosha Comets in 1943 and in 1944 for the South Bend Blue Sox. The AAGPBL women were coached on and off the ball field. Charm school was a part of spring training camp. They wore a one piece short skirted uniform with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps during a grueling playing schedule. In 1988 the AAGBL was inducted into the Cooperstown Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshall, told their story in the film A league of Their Own. In 1998 the women were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL online (Accessed February 2014); Obituary 2018.
 
Helen Callaghan Married names 1. Candaele 2. St Aubin. Born Vancouver, British Columbia March 13, 1923. Died Santa Barbara, California, U.S.A. December 8, 1992. Coming from an avid and supportive sports loving family she left home to join the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. Within a few months her concerned father sent her older sister Margaret to join the league and look after the younger Helen. The girls played successfully in the league for several years from 1944. The left handed out fielder did not play in 1947 due to illness but returned after a marriage and the birth of a child to play in 1948 retiring in 1949. The original “boys of summer” had left the playing fields to join the fighting in World War ll were now coming home and reclaiming the baseball fans back to the all male games. The sisters never spoke of their life on the road with the league with family. However when son Kelly found his aunt’s old scrapbook he used it to produce a Public Broadcasting Service documentary on the girls. Hollywood director Penny Marshall was taken with the documentary and the well-known movie A League of Their Own was released in 1992. In 1998 all 64 Canadian Women who had played in the All American League Girl’s Baseball League were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Helen’s Grandson Casey Candaele has played for the Montreal Expos, the Houston Astros and Cleveland Indians. Sources: British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame website (Accessed May 2009)  ; W. C. Madden; The women of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League: a Biographical Dictionary , McFarland & Co., 2005 .
 
Margaret Callaghan Married name Maxwell. Born Vancouver, British Columbia December 23, 1921.  A youngster whose family embraced sports and who enjoyed track and field, file hockey, lacrosse, basketball but mainly baseball. Her younger sister joined the women’s baseball league and Margaret’s father asked her to join the All American League Girls Professional Baseball league to look after her sister. Margaret would play seven seasons in the popular “girl’s league” a welcome addition to the Minneapolis Millerettes, the Fort Wayne Daisies, the South Bend Blue Sox, the Peoria Redwings and in 1951 the Battle Creek Belles. Girls baseball took on popularity when the “Boys of summer” went off to fight in World War ll. Once the men returned from war the girl’s teams were not as popular and not needed to entertain the home fields. Returning home to regular life the two sisters never talked much about their life on the road for baseball. An old scrapbook aroused interest of a nephew and a Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) documentary by  Margaret’s nephew Kelly Candaele caught the eye of movie director Penny Marshall. Margaret and Helen’s story became the base for the well known Hollywood movie A league of their own, 1992. In June 1988 64 Canadian women who played in the All American League Girls Professional Baseball were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Sources: Famous, should be famous, and Infamous Canadians http://wwwfamouscanadian.net/name/c/callgh... (accessed May 2011.) : W. C. Madden ; The women of the All American League: a Biographical Dictionary. (Mcfarland & Co., 2005. : British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame website (Accessed may 2009)
 
Eleanor Callow Born August 8, 1927, Winnipeg Manitoba. “Squirt” was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. She played for the Peoria Redwings and in 1948 the Chicago Colleens before being traded to the Rockford Peaches for whom she played until the League folded in 1954. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. With demise of the AAGPBL Eleanor returned home to Saskatchewan where she played for the Saskatoon Hub City Ramblers ladies softball team. In 1955 the team won the Western Canadian Senior Women’s Championships. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Manitoba women were inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. Sources: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014); “Eleanor Callow member of 1955 Canadian Championship Team. Girls of Summer; In their own league blog by Lois Browne Online (Accessed March 2014)
 
Muriel Eleanor Coben Born February 17, 1921, Gelert, Ontario. Her family relocated to Tessier Saskatchewan when she was young. She began a career in baseball in 1936 by pitching as a member of the winning Tessier Millionaires. From 1938 through 1942 she played for the Saskatoon Pats. She was scouted for the newly formed All American Girls Professional Baseball  League and in 1943 she played with the South Bend Blue Sox and the Rockford Peaches.  The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll.Howevershe found it difficult to play the different League rules and in 1944 she returned to play for the Saskatoon Pats. In 1946 she was playing for the Saskatoon Grey Cab Ramblers where she stayed until 1950. In 1946, 1947, and 1948 the team was provincial Champions and in 1946 and 1947 they also won the Western Canadian Championships. In 1950 she moved to Edmonton, Alberta and joined Mortons Ball Club which won the Canadian Championships in 1952. She returned to the Ramblers in Saskatoon for her last season. Muriel then took up curling and was a member of the 1960 National Championship team. In 1979 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame as an individual athlete. In 1986 she was inducted into the Hall of Fame for her efforts in softball. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A.  National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  Sources: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Dorothy Cook Born St. Catherines, Ontario (?) Dorothy enjoyed playing baseball in the St Catherines Ladies Softball League. In 1939 she played with the Monarch Knit team who were the St. Catherines are Industrial Champions. In 1940 she played for the Lightning Fastener Zippers. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League where in 1946 she played with the Fort Wayne Daisies and the Rockford Peaches. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. Ladies baseball leagues faded out by 1953 in the U.S.A., after all the “boys of summer” were back on the playing field. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. June 4,1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted as honourary into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  Sources: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014): Special thanks to the St. Catharines Public Library Special Collections Sandra Enskat who searched "Ladies Softball League, St. Catharines, 1919 - 1960" by Marg Schram and Maggie Likavec and "Extra Innings: Ladies Softball League, St. Catharines, 1919 - 1960" by Maggie Likavec.
 
Penny Martineuk Cooke

'Peanuts O'Brian'
née O’Brian. Born August 16, 1919, Smoky Lake, Alberta. Died April 29, 2010 Vancouver, British Columbia. In 1944 she married Earl Cooke, (died 1969) who was serving in the Canadian Navy at the time. The couple would have three children. When she was scouted to play baseball by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGBL) she decided the high pay that was being offered was worth it. In 1945 she played with the Fort Wayne Daisies. That season she stole 43 bases in 83 games.  The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the  National Baseball Hall of Fame Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal used the AAGBL as inspiration to tell their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, St Marys, Ontario. In 1981 she moved from Alberta to British Columbia to be closer to her children. Source: Obituary, The Vancouver Sun, May 8, 2010. ; ; AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)  (2018)
 
Audrey Hines Daniels

(née Haines) Born May 9, 1927, Winnipeg, Manitoba. At 16 she was playing baseball with the St. Anthony Brown Bombers in the Winnipeg Catholic League and then the St. Vital Tigerettes of the Greater Winnipeg Senior Girls Softball League. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. Since her family was poor she no doubt partially lured to the AAGPBL by the hefty $50.00 plus a week paycheck. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. “Audi” of “Dimples” as she was sometimes called, was pitcher in 1944 for the Minneapolis Millerettes and 1945 she pitched for Fort Wayne Daisies. In 1946 she was with the Grand Rapids Chicks and in 1947 the Peoria Redwings. She left to marry Austin “Bud” Daniels in 1948 but was back again in 1951 with the Rockford Peaches. When she retired from the game she and Bud settled in Ohio and raised their 6 children. She also helped to start and run the family business. November 5,1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Also in 1998 the Canadian Women from Manitoba were inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame.  Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed : February 2014) : “Ballplayer Audrey Daniels of Bay Village traveled from Canada for women’s league…” by Jeff Piorowski, Sun News, October 15, 2010.
 

Gladys Davis Born September 1, 1919, Toronto, Ontario. She enjoyed playing baseball and was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. While she played in the League she had the nickname “Terrie” of “Terry”. She stared her AAGPBL career playing with the Rockford Peaches and in 1943 was the 1st batting champion of the league with an average .332. That year she was on the All Star Team.  In 1944 she played with the Milwaukee chicks, and in 1946 she was with the Muskegon Lassies. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  When she returned home to Toronto after retiring from the League,  she owned and worked in her own interior decorating business. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Marguerite Davis (née Jones) Born November 3, 1917, Regina, Saskatchewan. Died May 9,1995. She enjoyed playing sports and was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. She played part of the 1944 season with the Minneapolis Millerettes and the last part of that season with the Rockford Peaches.  The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1945 she returned home and married Gordon Davis. The couple had 4 children. Marg continued to play softball in Regina for several years. before the family moved to Moose Jaw in 1958. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Lena "Lee" Delmonico (née Surkowski) Born October 26, 1925, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Died March 30, 2012, California, U.S.A. Lee enjoyed playing baseball with her sister Anne. Anne was the first of the two sisters to be scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1944 she played with the South Bend Blue Sox and in 1945 she and her sister Anne played on the team together. In 1947 Lee and Anne returned home for the season for family reasons. In 1948 Lee was back in the league playing for the Fort Wayne Daisies. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In the early days of the League the women were coached off the field with lessons in Charm to make sure they would respectfully represent the AAGPBL to the press and fans. She married Alphonso Delmonico and in 1957 the couple moved to California, U.S.A. where they raised their three children. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Anne Deyotte née Surkowski. Born February 22, 1923, Moose Jaw , Saskatchewan. Anne and her younger sister Lena “Lee” enjoyed playing baseball. In 1945 Anne was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1945 Anne joined Lee playing with the South Bend Blue Sox. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1947 both  Anne and Lee returned home for family reasons and Anne remained in Saskatchewan rather than return to the AAGPBL. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. The players from Saskatchewan were also inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Terry Donahue Born August 22, 1925 Melaval, Saskatchewan. She loved to play ball with her brothers on the family farm. She played with the local baseball team, Royals in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball league in 1945. She played with the Peoria Redwings through to 1949. In 1950 she joined the Admiral Music Maids of the National Girls Baseball League in Chicago. The women were coached on and off the field . Charm school was part of spring training camp. After the girls baseball leagues folded she worked 38 years bookkeeping for a Chicago Interior design firm retiring in 1990. The women of the league were inducted into the Cooperstown Baseball hall of Fame in 1988.  In1992 director Penny Marshall told the AAGPBL story in the movie A league of their own. In 1998 Canadian players were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. All the women who played in the League were also inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.  In 2009 Terry and two male baseball players were Grand Marshalls of the Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Source:  AAGPBL online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Julianna Rita Dusanko (née Sabo) Born February 22, 1922, Regina, Saskatchewan. Died August 22, 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A. Just two months after she married airman Eugene Dusanko she was scouted for the All American Girls Baseball League. In 1944 she played with the Minneapolis Millerettes and then the Racine Bells. In 1945 she switched leagues playing for the Parichy Bloomer Girls in the National Girls Baseball League. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  She returned home to Saskatchewan and played fast pitch with 2 championship teams. In 1963 the couple relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.A. The couple had one son. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Elsie Wingrove Earl née Wingrove. Born September 26, 1923, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Died July 13, 2016, Estivan, Saskatchewan. Elsie enjoyed playing baseball with her brothers, her sister and their father. There always seemed to be a game on Sunday afternoon when neighbors would drop by the farm. At 9 she was playing on an adult team. In high school she enjoyed ice hockey, curling, 5 pin bowling and fastpitch softball. She worked at a bank to pay her way through school at the Saskatchewan Technical College where she played softball for the school’s team, The Pats. While playing she was seen by a scout from the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1946 she played with the Grand Rapids Chicks and for awhile was loaned out to the Fort Wayne Daisies. In 1947, back in Grand Rapids, the Chicks were the League Champions. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1948 she returned home to marry immigration officer, Russell Earl. The couple would have two sons. She and her husband coacher Little League Baseball and junior girls fastpitch softball. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Helen Nicol  "Nikie" Fox Born May 9, 1920, Ardley, Alberta. Nikie enjoyed playing sports, all sorts of sports. She was involved in various sports competing in baseball, hockey, speed skating, and golf for more than forty years.  As a softball pitcher, she played for several teams including the Calgary Chinooks, Avenue Grill Cooks, Parkhill Vic's, Wittichens, and the Edmonton Army & Navy Pats, Walkrites, She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. She was pitcher for the Kenosha Comets, 1943-1947, The Rockford Peaches, 1947-1952. In 1943 she was a member of the all star team and pitcher of the year. In 1945 she married and took the surname Fox. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Helen is also a member of the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. Helen played center ice for the Calgary Avenue Grill Chinooks, who captured both the Southern Alberta Ladies' and the Banff Winter Carnival Hockey Championships. She also competed in the 1940 Banff Winter Carnival as a speed skater and won the Senior Ladies' 880 with a record setting pace of 1:39 1-5. In provincial competition, the same year, she was runner-up for the title with a total of 50 points. After moving to Arizona in 1972, Helen Nicol won several golf tournaments including the Phoenix-Motorola Open five times.  Source AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Alberta Sports Hall of Fame (Accessed March 2014)
 
Ruth Middleton Gentry (née Middleton) Born August 25, 1930, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died May 13, 2008, Hamilton , Indiana, U.S. A. Ruth was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1950 she played for the Chicago Colleens. 1951 and 1952 she was with the Battle Creek Belles and she finished her career with the Muskegon Belles in 1953. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. After she left the League she settled in Indiana where she worked as bookkeeper for Yoder Ford in Garrett, Indiana. October 13, 1972 she married Jerry Gentry. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and the players born in Manitoba are also members of the Manitoba Softball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Obituary, Oberlin Turnbull Funeral Home, Indiana, Online (Accessed March 2014)
 
Olga Grant (née Middleton) Born August 25, 1930, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died May 13, 2008, Hamilton , Indiana, U.S. A. Ruth was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1950 she played for the Chicago Colleens. 1951 and 1952 she was with the Battle Creek Belles and she finished her career with the Muskegon Belles in 1953. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. After she left the League she settled in Indiana where she worked as bookkeeper for Yoder Ford in Garrett, Indiana. October 13, 1972 she married Jerry Gentry. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and the players born in Manitoba are also members of the Manitoba Softball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Obituary, Oberlin Turnbull Funeral Home, Indiana, Online (Accessed March 2014)
 
Marjorie Hanna Born Calgary, Alberta. She enjoyed playing baseball and was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1944 she played with the Kenosha Comets. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Agnes "Aggie / Ag" Holmes (née Zurowski) Born February 21, 1920, Edenwold, Saskatchewan. Died June 25, 2013, Regina, Saskatchewan. As a young woman she moved to Regina where she would find work at the Army Navy department store where she would work for 48 years before retiring in 1989. In her spare time she enjoyed playing softball and in 1944 she was a member of the Regina Bombers the city championship team. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and in 1945 pitched for the Fort Wayne Daisies and Racine Bells. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. She returned to Canada to play with the Edmonton Mortons from 1945 through 1952. She married Delbert Holmes and settled in Regina. In 1988 the Edmonton Mortons were inducted into the Alberta Softball Hall of Fame. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1991 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Obituary, Speers Funeral and Crematorium Services, June 25, 2013.
 
Thelma "Thel" Josephine Hundeby (née Grambo” Born October 28, 1923, Hagen, Saskatchewan. Died July 30, 2001, Central Butte, Saskatchewan. She played baseball with the Grey Cabs Ramblers in Saskatoon when she was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1946 she played the position of catcher with the Grand Rapids Chicks. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. She returned home and on October 26, 1947 she married Robert Hundeby. The couple settled in Elbow, Saskatchewan where the couple raised their seven children.  November 5,1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. June 4,1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Dorothy  'Dottie' Hunter Born January 28, 1916, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died August 17, 2005 (various dates of her death are recorded August 9, August 17) Her dad was a soccer coach and Dottie enjoyed playing all the games like soccer, basketball and baseball with the boys. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional League and played with Kenosha Comets and Racine Bells in 1943 before joining the Grand Rapids Chicks from 1945- 1954. She is one of the few players who played all 11 years of the League. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. Dottie not only played for the team but she was also a team chaperone. Chaperones protected the morals of the players at home as well as on the road. The girls were officially forbidden to drink, gamble, violate curfew, wear shorts or slacks in public, or go out on dates alone without permission and an interview of the prospective swain. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. The women from Manitoba who played in the AAGPBL were inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1998. . Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Daisy Juror (née Knezovich). Born October 7, 1920, Regina Saskatchewan. Died April 29, 2012. As a child she loved and excelled in sports. In 1935 she played fast ball with the Regina Caps. The team sown the Western Canada Championships in 1945 with her as all-star left field and power hitter. In order to live one had to have a paying job so she worked as a packer at the Burns Meat Company. In 1942 she married Dave Juror, foreman of the meat plant. In 1943, with men becoming involved in the impending war a four-team league of women’s baseball was formed to keep the fans interest. She refused their first offer but her sister Ruby signed on. When the league was revived and expanded in 1946 Daisy join in on the fun. This was the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, brought to modern attention through the movie a League of their own. Daisy was interviewed for the movie. She had played for the South Bend Indiana Blue Sox, the Springfield Sallies and the Fort Wayne Daisies. The teams played seven nights a week and double headers on Sundays and Holidays! Daisy returned home in 1949 and enjoyed the bowling where by the late 1950’s she was a team member of the Ladies Western Canadian Championships. She also enjoyed golf  and in 1967 was the Regina City Ladies Golf Champion. In the 1970’s she was Senior Ladies Golf Champion and a member of the five teams playing in the Canadian Championships. She has been inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Sports Hall of Fame, the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and as part of the AAGPBL the Baseball Sports Hall of Fame , Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. Source: “Pro Baseball player in league of her own, went on to excel in bowling, golf” by Chris Ewing-Weisz. The Globe and Mail May 19, 2012.
 
Dorothy B. Fergusson Key (née Fergusson) Born Virden, Manitoba. Died May 8, 2003, Rockford, Illinois, U.S.A. “Dottie” as she was called enjoyed sports. She excelled as a young girl in the winter sport of speed skating and in summer it was softball. She would have represented Canada at the 1940 Olympic Games had the games not been cancelled due to World War ll. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and in 1945 played for the Rockford Peaches. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. The women were not only coached in the game but off the field as well. They women attended charm school as part of the spring training camp. Dottie married Donald Key in 1949 but would not accept his proposal until he accepted that she would continue to play for the League. Dottie averaged 46 stolen bases each year with 91 in the 1951 season alone. She was also a member of 4 League Championship teams. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and the Manitoba women were inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Mary Kustra (née Shastral) Born December 10, 1925, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died May 16, 1999, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Mary enjoyed sports and was scouted by the All American Girls Professional  Baseball League. In 1944 she played for the Milwaukee Chicks. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. The women were not only coached in the game but off the field as well. They women attended charm school as part of the spring training camp. After the season was over Mary returned to Winnipeg and played softball for four years. She married and the couple had one son. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and the Manitoba women were inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Olive Bend Little (née Bend) Born May 7, 1917 Poplar Point Manitoba. Died February 2, 1987. As a young girl she loved to play baseball with her coaching Dad. She would become the star player and pitcher of the local girl’s team. She was pitcher for the Saskatchewan Moose Jaw Royals which moved from the bottom of their league to win the Saskatchewan Championships in 1940. Returning home she taught school before marring George Little in 1942. By 1943 she had been scouted and was playing in the All American Girls Professional Baseball league where she holds the record of pitching 4 no hitter games. She retired from the AAGPBL in 1945 and returned home to coaching with her Dad. She and husband George became coaches for the Poplar Point Girls Fastball Team. Some of their team members joined the Ukrainian Athletic Club which won the 1965 Canadian Championship. In 1985 Olive was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. She is also a member of the Softball Canada Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Starting in 1998 the Olive Little memorial Award is presented annually to the Manitoba Softball Association’s top female player. Source: Herstory The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2008 (Coteau Books, 2007) : Women of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League: a Biographical Dictionary by W.C. Madden (McFarland & Co., 2005)
 
Mildred "Millie" Marion McAuley (née Warwick) Born October 18, 1922, Regina, Saskatchewan. Died December 9, 2006, Edmonton , Alberta. She enjoyed playing sports with her twin brother and other members of her sport active family. She played softball at school and enjoyed additional sports such as basketball, gymnastics, volleyball and speed skating. When she was 20 she was playing softball for the Regina Army Navy Bombers. In 1940 , 1941 and again in 1948 she was a member of the Ladies Softball Championship teams.  On May 17, 1943 she was in Chicago to play baseball in the All  American Girls Professional Baseball League and on July 1, 1943 after a season with the Rockford Peaches she was playing the 1st All Star Game. She returned home to Saskatchewan before relocating to Edmonton , Alberta where she played with the Edmonton Mortons and was a member of the 1951 National Championship team. In 1986 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame along with her brothers, Claude, a professional boxer, Grant, Richard, and William all professional hockey players. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1991 she entered the Alberta Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Kay Helen McDaniel née Heim. Born August 21, 1917. Died June 11, 2015. As a girl she always enjoyed sports. She was living in Edmonton, Alberta when she was scouted to play baseball in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. Nicknamed 'Heimie' she played the position of catcher in 1943 and 1944 with the Kenosha Comets. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed 2018)
 
Ruby Martz (née Knezovich) Born March 18, 1918, Regina, Saskatchewan. Died August 1, 1995. She and her family all enjoyed sports. In 1943 she was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1943 and 1944 seasons she was catcher for the Racine Belles. Her sister Daisy Junor was also scouted and played with the League from 1946 through 1949. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. The women were not only coached in the game but off the field as well. They women attended charm school as part of the spring training camp. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.   Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Kay Helen McDaniel Born August 21, 1917. “Heimie” enjoyed playing sports playing Hockey, basketball and baseball. As a young woman she worked at the local Hudson Bay Company department store earning $9.50 a week. She played baseball with the Harmy Navy Pats, a department store team when she was  scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and offered $85.00 a week to play baseball!. She would play almost all eleven years of the league’s existence. She played for the Kenosha Comets and later for the Rockford Peaches. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.   Kay retired to Tempe , Arizona, U.S.A. Sources: “Women ballplayers to gather for a reunion of their own” by Mike Sakal, East Valley Tribune, Arizona, U.S.A. October 13, 2011 Online (Accessed March 2014) ; AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Anne Jane McFarlane née Thompson. Born Edmonton, Alberta. As a girl she enjoyed playing baseball. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and was pitcher for the Racine Belles in 1943. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.   Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Genevieve "Gene" McFaul née George. Died March 11, 2002. Her sister Mary “Bonnie” Baker was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and played from 1943 through 1952. Gene was scouted by the AAGPBL and played for the Muskegon Lassies. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Evelyn 'Evie' Moroz (née Wawryshyn) Born November 11, 1924, Tyndall, Manitoba. The only girl in a family with three brothers she usually was included in sports with the boys. She enjoyed ice hockey in winter and track & field and baseball in the summer. In 1940 she was the North Eastern Manitoba Girls Track and Field Champion. She played fastball pitch with the Canadian Ukrainian Athletic Club Blues, who were the provincial championship tem in 1945. That year she won the Koman Trophy for most valuable player. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League in 1946 began playing with the Kenosha Comets before switching to the Muskegon Lassies. In 1948 she played with the Springfield Lassies and 1949 through 1951 she played with the Fort Wayne Daisies. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In her baseball off season she played ice hockey. She was the top scorer for the Senior Women’s Hockey team in Winnipeg. The team won both the Western and Eastern Canadian finals in 1950. In 1951 she married. November 5, 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. June 4,1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  Evie was also inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1992. In the Great Canadian Book of Lists, she is listed as one of the five greatest Canadian born female baseball players.  Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) :
 
Doreen 'Betty' Allen Mullins née Petryna. Born November 26, 1930, Regina Saskatchewan. Active in sports she excelled in baseball. She was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and would play 3rd base in 1948 for the Grand Rapids Chicks. It was at one of the games that she met her husband Ron Allen. The couple had three children who were all introduced and coached in baseball by their mother. In 1949 Betty played for the Fort Wayne Daisies and in 1950 for the Muskegon Lassies. She settled in Sycamore, Illinois, U.S.A. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Arleen 'Johnnie' Johnson Noga Born January 1, 1924, Ogema, Saskatchewan. Died March 14, 2017 Regina Saskatchewan. In 1945 she was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1945 she played for the Fort Wayne Daisies and 1946through 1948 she played with the Muskegon Lassies. Back in Canada she played softball in Regina from 1949 through to 1979. During her 30 year competitive amateur career she would play on 9 provincial championship teams and 5 Western Canadian Championship teams. She was voted Most Valuable Player twice. In 1963 she married Ron Noga and the couple raised 2 children. An ardent supporter of her sport she was 12 years a member of the Board of Directors of the AAGPBL Players Association. In 1988 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Sports Hall of Fame and in November of that year the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A.  National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1989 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame. In 1998/1999 Arleen served on the Saskatchewan Baseball Association. In 2004 she was inducted into the Regina Sports Hall of Fame and Saskatchewan Baseball Association recognized her as a builder of the sport. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Vickie Panos (Panos is sometimes recorded as Pano) Born March 20, 1920, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. She enjoyed sports especially baseball. She was scouted to play with the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1944 she played with both the South Bend Blue Sox and the Milwaukee Chicks. She stole 141 bases in the 115 games she played with the League. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. After she left the AAGPBL she played with the Chicago Bluebirds of the National Girls Baseball League. She married as World War ll airman and the couple settled in Australia. Her great Grandson (born 2000) also enjoys playing baseball.  A book, Vickie Panos was written by Lambert M. Shurhone, Jessie Russell and Ronald Cohn. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) : “Players of the AAGPBL and the NGBL by Lois Browne , Girls of Summer: blog. (Accessed March 2014) ; Great grandson  enjoys playing baseball , The Cardinals on Tumblr. Accessed March 2014)
 
Janet Margaret Anderson Perkin née Anderson. Born November 21, 1921, Montreal , Quebec. Died March 30, 2012, Regina , Saskatchewan. Her family moved to Bethune, Saskatchewan where Janet attended school. She began a career as a teacher when she was scouted for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 1946 she was pitcher with the Kenosha Comets. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. Returning home after one season with the League she worked for Allied Van lines. In 1953 she was part of the team that won the 1st Western    Canadian Curling championships. She would be a member of the provincial curling championship teams in 1953, 1959 and again in 1964. In 1954 she also enjoyed playing with the Regina Govins Softball Club. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. She was also inducted into the Saskatchewan Curling Association Hall of Fame in 2004. In 2005 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame for her curling achievements. In 2008 she was inducted into the Regina Saskatchewan Sorts Hall of Fame for her softball achievements. Source: Obituary, Regina Leader Post, April, 2012. ; : AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Lucella "Lu" Catherine Ross née MacLean.  Born January 3, 1921, Lloydminster, Saskatchewan. Died June 25, 2012. She always enjoyed sports of all kinds. She began to skate when she was four at  school she played field hockey, basketball, softball and even track and field. From 1935 through to 1942 she played softball with teams such as Lloydminster’s womens team who won the Ester Trophy from 1937 through 1940. In 1940 she joined the Saskatoon Pat’s who in 1941 won the provincial Hunking Trophy. Most players had jobs to pay for “life” and Lu worked as a telephone clerk. She was scouted for the newly formed All American Girls Professional Baseball League that offered $50.00 a week for playing ball there was only one decision to make. She played for the South Bend Blue Sox in 1943 and 1944. Back in Canada in 1945 she played with the Army Navy Pats in Edmonton, Alberta. She retuned to the U.S.A. and from 1946 through 1953 she played with the National Girls Baseball League. In 1951 she married Jesse More but in 1957 she became a widow. She married George Ross in 1960. November 5,1988 the AAGPBL was included into the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. National Baseball Hall of Fame. April 6, 1991 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Hall of Fame. She is also a member of the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.  ; AAGPBL Online (Accessed February
 
Helen Sandiford née Nelson.  Born June 13, 1919, Toronto, Ontario. Died February 6, 1993. An avid sports person, Helen was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. She played catcher for the Rockford Peaches in 1943. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. After leaving baseball she worked for Walgreens Drugstore where she rose to be executive secretary to the Senior Vice President of the company. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Yolande "Yoyo" Schick née Teillet. Born September 28, 1927,  St. Vital, Manitoba. Died January 26, 2006, Winnipeg, Manitoba. She enjoyed sports while growing up and played catcher for the St. Vital Tigerettes girls softball team. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professionals Baseball League. In 1945 she was one of the 1st Métis players in the AAGPBL.  She played first for the Fort Wayne Daisies. In 1946 she played with the Grand Rapids Chicks in 1947 with the Kenosha Comets. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. She Married William Schick and became a dedicated mother to their 9 children. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998. The women from Manitoba were also inducted into the Manitoba Baseball Hall of Fame. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) : Obituary, Winnipeg Free Press, January 2006.
 
June Rose Schofield Born 1926, Toronto, Ontario. Died June 24, 2002, Santa Monica, California, U.S.A. Growing up in Toronto, June excelled at baseball and although she played in her late teens with the Sunnyside Girls team called the Sunday Morning Class she much preferred to be one of the boys. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League for which she played for two years. In 1948 she played with the Springfield Sallies and in 1949 she played for the Muskegon Lassies and the Peoria Redwings. It would be most interesting to know how she earned her nickname “Moneybags.” The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998. After June left baseball she settled in Santa Monica where she was married two times. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; June Rose Schofield: Ballplayer in storied women’s League” by Valerie Hauch, The Toronto Star, July 12, 2002
 
Thelma Jo Walmsley Born April 13, 1918, Sudbury, Ontario. Thelma enjoyed sports in her youth, especially baseball. She was scouted by the All American Girls Professional Baseball League and played for the Racine Belles in 1946. That was the year that the belles won the League championships. The women in the AAGPBL wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. The players in the first years of the League were coached on and off the field when they had to attend charm school. The women played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A League of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998. The Copper Cliff (Sudbury area in Ontario) keeps Thelma’s 1946 baseball jacket on display for all to see. Source: AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Copper Cliff Museum, Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Diane Warriner Diane enjoyed playing ball during recess at school. Playing at the CNE Bulova Watch softball tournament in 1968, she was scouted by an American team, the Raybestos Brakettes from Stratford, Conneticut, U.S.A.  who asked the 17 year-old pitcher to join their club the next season. Diane soon became a member of the National Softball Team in the position of pitcher. She played for the team from 1969 through 1973.She was inducted into Softball's Canada Hall of Fame. Diane taught High School and took the Chinguacousy junior girls to the provincial championships in 1982 to 1984 with the team winning three Gold Medals and two silver medals at the American Softball championships and winning the 1st international women's softball competition in Italy in 1972. She had a knee injury in the mid 1970's  and switched to coaching.   In 1983 this club won the provincial title and took silver at the Nationals. In 1984 she received the Canadian Amateur Softball Association's outstanding service award. She received an International Softball Federation (ISF) Recognition Award for her work in Belize, Venezuela and Bermuda for helping to develop the sport in these countries.  Diane coached her Chinguacousy Senior ladies softball team to win the 1989 provincial and national competitions. In 1989 Diane was named Coach of the Year by the Ontario Softball Association. The team returned in 1990 to win Bronze. In 1990 she was inducted into the Brampton, Ontario, Sport Hall of Fame.  Diane runs clinics, gives lectures and provides individual training in her sport. She is a founding member of the Softball National Coaching Certification Program and instructs NCCP technical theory courses. In 2005 Diane retired from teaching and relocated to Orangeville, Ontario to raise her daughter.
 
Elizabeth "Betty" Ann Berthiaume Wicken née Berthiaume. Born May 26, 1927, Regina Saskatchewan. Died April 24, 2011, Vancouver, British Columbia. Betty enjoyed playing ball and was scouted by the All American Girls Professional baseball League. She played for the Grand Rapids Chicks 1945  and in 1946 the Muskegon Lassies. The AAGPBL women were coached on and off the field. Charm school was a part of every spring training camp. The women wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A league of Their Own. In 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. When the leagues folded and Betty retired from the sport she worked in a newspaper office and as a school secretary. Source AAGPBL Online (Accessed February 2014)
 
Doris Witiuk née Shero. Born May 22, 1929, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died January 26, 2014, Spokane, Washington, U.S.A. She enjoyed sports and was scouted for the All American Girls Baseball League to play in 1950 with the Racine Belles and in 1951 with the Battle Creek Belles. Fellow players nicknamed her “baser” because of her amazing speed in rounding the bases. The women wore one piece short skirted uniforms with knee socks, baseball shoes and caps. They played a grueling schedule to keep baseball going while the men served during World War ll. In 1953 Baser married her childhood sweetheart, professional hockey player Steve Witiuk. The coulple would have 4 children. In 1962 the family relocated from Winnipoeg to Spokane, Washington, U.S.A. Doris worked as secretary treasurer for S&W Electric Inc. for 20 years.  November 5,1988 the AAGPBL was included in the Cooperstown National Baseball Hall of Fame. 1992, director, Penny Marshal told their story in the film A league of Their Own. June 4, 1998 the AAGPBL Canadian members were inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. The Manitoba women who played in the League were also inducted into the Manitoba Softball Hall of Fame.  In her honour the Doris Shero Witiuk Softball Scholarship was established at Mead High School, Spokane, Washington, U.S.A. Source: Obituary, Spokesman-Review, Spokane , Washington, U.S.A. January 29, 2014.
 
Basketball  
Marni Abbott-Peter

Wheelchair Basketball
née Abbott. Born November 10, 1965., Vancouver, British Columbia. She grew up having skier Nancy Green as neighbor as inspiration. She was soon on the snow slopes enjoying skiing .At 1 she had a serious accident that changed her life. She had broken her back in the accident and found herself living in a wheelchair. This time it would be a visit from Rick Hanson as he prepared for his world Wheels in Motion Tour who would give her inspiration. Within three years of her accident, Marni was swimming representing Canada at the Pan American Games in Puerto Rico winning 5 medals. In 1988 she began participating in wheelchair basketball and there was no turning around. In 1992 she became a member of team Canada. She was a pillar for the team with the women winning three Paralympics gold medals and one bronze, three straight world championships and embarked on a 43-game undefeated streak in Paralympics and world championship play. One of her favourite high lights of her competitive career was being chosen a Canadian flag bearer for the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics Games. In 2001 she was presented with the Stan Strange Award by the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association. In 2004 she retired from competition but returned to help Canada win the World bronze medal in 2010. In 2005 she married Richard Peter whom she had met playing basketball in 194. Turning her energies to coaching in wheelchair basketball she has earned numerous accolades. From 2004 through 2008 she was the Coach of the Year of the British Columbia Wheelchair Basketball Society. In 2007 she was inducted into the Wheelchair Canada Hall of fame and the following year was Coach of the Year of the Wheelchair Basketball Canada. In 2011 she earned the Rick Hanson from the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association. Source: Marni Abbott-Peter. Team Canada Wheelchair Basketball. Online Accessed January 2015.
 
Joyce Ann C. Douthwright Born April 25, 1950 Moncton, New Brunswick. Joyce was a member of the Canadian National women’s basketball team from 1969- She attended the University of New Brunswick and was Athlete of the year 1973-1974. She was also a member New Brunswick field hockey team 1969-1974. She represented Canada at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games as a member of the basketball team.  She has served technical director of the New Brunswick Amateur Basketball Association Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977)

 
Colleen Dufresne
Athlete & coach
Born February 15, 1953 Halifax, Nova Scotia. Coleen attended the University of Ottawa where she was a stong member of the Gee Gees women's basketball team. She continuted her education at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. In the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal she was a member of the Canadian Women's basketball team. From 1980 through 1984 Coleen was coack of women's basketball at the University of New Brunswick and for the of the years she was the Atlantic Coach of the year and in 1982-1983 she was Coach of the year in the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS). Relocating to Manitoba she became the 1st full time women's basketball coach with the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, a position she held until retirement in 2016. she would lead the team to three national Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) championships in 1987-1988, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997. The team would win silver at the CIS championships in 1994-1995 and again in 1997-1998. The women also won bronze medals in 1986-1987 and also in 1993-1994.  The Bison team was also winners numerous times in the Great Plains Athletic Converence. In 2001 Coleen became Director of Athletics at the University of Manitoba. In 2005 she was awarded the YWCA Woman of Distinction Award in the recreation category. In 2009 she was inducted into the Ottawa University Gee Gees Hal of Fame as a player and in 2005 she became a member of the Manitoba Basketball Hall of Fame as a 'Builder'. In 2017 Coleen was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Faye Burnham Eccleston née Burnham. Born June 2, 1920 Vancouver, British Columbia. Faye enjoyed sports since she was a child. She played field hockey and her team won the Pacific Northwest title when she was in high school. BA University of British Columbia. Faye married James Eccleston two children. Canadian Senior She was a member of the women’s basketball championship team member with the Vancouver Westerns 1940, Hedlunds 1942-46. She also enjoyed baseball being a member of the Vancouver Hedlunds softball champion’s team during war playing 3rd base. In 1944 Faye played on the Vancouver Neon Products team which won the 1944-45 the World Series in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.  After this winning game she rejected pro offers from Chicago Glamour League ladies team. While attending studies at the University of British Columbia (UBC), her prowess on the basketball court and the grass hockey field were so impressive that she was made a double Big Block winner after only one year of competition. The Big Blocks are awarded to UBC competitors who have achieved a high standard of excellence. In BA University of British Columbia. In 1950, she was named her field hockey league’s “Top Player of the Year. She became a physical education teacher coaching basketball, field hockey, Track and field, softball, volleyball. She has served as President of the British Columbia Branch of Women’s AAU of Canada and an active member of the National Advisory Council for Fitness and Amateur Sport. In 1966 she was inducted as a member of the province of British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977;; British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. Online Accessed February 2016
 
Noel MacDonald- Robertson

Born January 23, 1915, Mortlach, Saskatchewan. During the 1920’s she moved with her family to Edmonton Alberta. She enjoyed sports and excelled in high school basketball. After secondary school she played for 1 ½ years with the Gradettes, the developmental team for the famous Edmonton Grads Basketball team which she joined in 1933. She became captain in 1936 the year the grads won the Underwood Trophy, the top North American Basketball team award. The Grads never lost the Underwood trophy and it was given to them permanently when the trophy was retired. In 1938 the Canadian Press named Noel the Canadian Female Athlete of the Year. She retired in 1939 as Captain of the time and having played 135 games with the Grads. She was the team highest scorer of all time. When she retired she married Harry Robertson, a hockey player who became a successful petroleum exporter. The couple travelled internationally for Harry’s business. Noel would serve on the executive of the Canadian Amateur Basketball Association and would coach basketball at high schools in both Saskatchewan as well as the team at the University of Alberta. In 1971 she was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. Source: Our Story in Sport (Fitzhenry and Whiteside 2002) ; Saskatchewan Sports: Lives Past and Present. Online (Accessed February 2014) ; Canada’s Sport Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed February 2014)
 

Frances "Fran" Anne Wigston Eberhard Born May 28, 1935, North Bay, Ontario. Fran delighted in sports all through school. All thorough high school and University of Western Ontario she excelled in volleyball, basketball as well as track and field. In 1957 she was teaching physical Education at South Secondary School, London, Ontario, where she was the 1st woman to referee boys high school basketball in London.  She was playing with the Canadian volley ball championship teams 1966-1968 and the Canadian basketball team 1967-68. She was a coach-player with the London Grads basketball team 1964-1974. She was on the silver medal Basketball team in the 1967 Canada Winter Games, and again when the team took gold in 1971.  Soon she was working at Althouse College, University of Western Ontario training High School teachers. She coached the UWO women’s track and field team to provincial champions three times. Her 14 passenger Suburban was known as the “WigMobile”, transporting teams to numerous events. She earned $300.00 a year as full time women’s coach while the Men’s hockey team coach earned $5000.00. She fought hard for women’s team financing often using her own funds to get her teams to events. She also served on the National Advisory Council on Sports pushing for women to become involved in sports administration. In 1994 she received the Women’s Athletic Alumnae Award. It was one of many awards she would earn. In 2005 she was inducted into the London Sports Hall of Fame and in 20012 she became the first woman inducted into both women’s basketball and women’s volleyball Halls of Honour. The Fran Wigston Award is given each year in London to the outstanding female High School Athlete. Sources: Who’s Who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson (Prentice Hall, 1977) ; “Fran Eberhard (Wigston)” Celebrating London’s Women’s History. London Women’s History Project. Online accessed November 2013
 
Ruth Wilson Born April 27, 1919 Calgary, Alberta. Died 2001, Vancouver, British Columbia. Her family moved to British Columbia where the youth was encouraged by her mother to play tennis. Winning the provincial doubles, mixed doubles and Pacific Northwest Doubles championships did not however keep her interest in the sport. She attended the University of British Columbia and went on to earn her Masters in education at Western Washington State College. She enjoyed varsity basketball and went on to play on 5 national championship basketball teams in the 1940”s. As a coach in the sport she founded the Eilers and the team won the 1950-51 senior “A” title. In 1967 she was the coach of the Pan Am Games Team that won Canada’s first medal, a bronze. In 1973 her Buzz Bomb team were also national title holders. In total her basketball coaching career spanned 35 years. She also enjoyed softball and played in two women’s world  series. As a golfer she played on eight Interprovincial teams and won the Canadian title four times as well as playing internationally. She has been inducted into the UBC and the British Columbia Sports halls of Fame. She is considered British Columbia’s greatest all round female athelete.
 
Bobsledding  
Kaillie Humphries née Simundson. Born September 4, 1985. Always interested in sports she competed in alpine skiing in her teen years. After breaking both legs in crashes she retired from skiing. In 2002 she began her sport career in bobsleigh and was an alternate for the Canadian team in the 2006 Olympic Games, Torino, Italy. Kaillie wan the Gold Medal in the two woman at the 2010 Winter Olympics, Vancouver, British Columbia and again at the 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia. Kaillie and Elana Meyers (1984-   ) became the 1st women to pilot a mixed-Gender team in the 1st four-man bobsleigh competition allowing women to compete with/against men.  By the end of the 2013-2014 season Kaillie hd won 28 Federation International de Bobsleigh et de Tobogganing (FIBT) , seven FIBT World Championships and 2 Olympic Games Medals. In 2014 she was awarded by the Canadian Press the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's Top Overall Athlete of the Year. On January 9, 2016, Humphries became the first woman to drive an all-female team against men in a four-person World Cup bobsled race; her teammates were Cynthia Appiah, Genevieve Thibault and Melissa Lotholz. Kaillie Married Dan Humphries, a fellow bobsledder, but they were divorced in 2014.
 
Body Building      back
Sherry Ann Boudreau Born Victoria British Columbia March 25. Growing up in Richmond, British Columbia she enjoyed being both a Brownie and a Girl Guide. Sherry Ann completed her studies in cosmetology and is also certified in aerobics and weight training. After the birth of her second child she decided to become competitive in fitness events. She has worked her way to first place in international events. In 2004 she was competing successfully in body building events at the international levels!!!  She is in the process of writing a book called : Start Today, Tomorrow Never Comes. She hopes it will inspire all who will read it. Sherry Ann loves a challenge and feels it is so much fun staying health, find and positive. If you search for her name on the internet you will find her personal web page.
 
Bowling - Ten Pin      back
Cathy Townsend. Born June 8, 1937 Campbelltown, New Brunswick. While living and working in Montreal, Quebec she took up 10 pin bowling in 1963. By 1967 she was representing Canada internationally. In 1968 she was Montreal's sportswriters city female bowler of the year. In 1974 she and her doubles partner won the Federation Internationale des Quilleurs (FIQ) Gold medal championship.  In 1975 while she was Canadian 10-pin Champion she was the 1st Canadian woman to win the AMF Bowling Cup . During her trip to these world games her equipment and clothing were lost in transit and she had to obtain a new bowling ball and special shoes required for a left handed bowler! In 1976 she too the gold medal-all events at the Tournament of the Americas Miami, Florida, U.S.A.   She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She is one of Canada's most decorated international 10-pin bowlers.
 
Bowling - Lawn bowling      back
Joyce Astrid Wayling Joyce is visually impaired. Joyce took tope gold medals at the Canadian National Championships for the Visually Impaired in 1995 through 1999 and again in 2001. She took second place silver medals at these Championships in 1994 and in 2002. In 1998 and in 2001 she was awarded the City of Brampton, Ontario Sports Achievement Awards for achieving excellence in her sport. She has also served as President of the Brampton Visually Impaired Pers and vice president of the Ontario Lawn Bowling Associations for the Blind.  She has competed internationally in six World Championships in singles, pairs and team competition, where she won Silver and Bronze Medals. She won the Silver Medal at the World Bowls for Visually Impaired Bowlers held in Scotland in 2001 and a Bronze Medal at the International Paralympic World Competition, Australia in 2001. In 2001 she was inducted into the Brampton Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Boxing    back
Jessica Rakoczy Born Hamilton Ontario April 14, 1977. In high school she was active in many competitive sports including hockey, baseball, soccer, track and swimming and was twice elected athlete of the year. At 20 she too up amateur boxing and went on to take the Ontario provincial bantamweight title. Her tryouts for the Canadian national team seemed prone to misfortune as a serious accident and broken bones kept her from the team. She made her professional debut on October 21, 2000 in Philadelphia, Mississippi, U.S.A. By spring 2005 she has had 20 professional fights with a 19-1 win record and holds the world lightweight championship.
 
Curling      back
Jan Betker

Born Regina, Saskatchewan July 19, 1960. She and her good friend Sandra Schmerler (1963-2000) enjoyed curling. In 1998 Jan was a member of Team Schmirler at the Nagano Olympics. The Team won the first gold medal for Olympic Curling. The Team also won three World Curling titles in 1993, 1994 and 1997. The women were entered into the Curling Hall of Fame in 1999 and made members of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. Source: Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame online accessed July 2011.
 

Marilyn C. Bodogh. Born March 9, 1955 Toronto, Ontario. A business woman who managers her own lumber yard and has owned several businesses including a funeral home and flower business. She is a well known motivational speaker. In her spare time she found time to be a member of the 1986 and 1996 Canadian and World Championship Curling teams. She has also co-authored a book on the sport of curling. in the late 1990's she became a colour commentator on Rogers Sportnet and Roger's TV in Ontario. She is a member of the St Catherines Ontario Hall of Fame. In 2006 she tried her hand a politics with an unsuccessful bid to be mayor of St Catherines, Ontario  (2017)
 
Theresa Breen Born December 4, 1965, Kingston, Ontario. Theresa was the long-time third for the Anne Merklinger rink in the 1990s. As a member of that team, she would win 4 provincial championships, and would play in Scott Tournament of Hearts tournaments, representing Ontario. Her 1st Tournament of Hearts appearance was in 1993, where the team won a bronze medal. In 1996 she won an Ontario Mixed title playing third with Rich Moffatt. She returned to the podium at the Tournament of Hearts in 1998, taking a silver medal and won silver again in 2000. Theresa relocated to Nova Scotia in the mid-2000s, and would join the Mary-Anne Arsenault rink for the 2008-09 season. In 2011, Breen won the Nova Scotia Mixed title playing lead for Paul Flemming. In 2014, she returned to play on the World Curling Tour and in 2015, as skip, she won her 1st World Curling Tour event.  Theresa has served as y the chair of the Sandra Schmirler (1963-2000) Foundation.
 
Ada Calles née Davies. Born October 12, 1920, Lancashire, England. Ada married Samuel Calles and the couple had 2 children. In 1951 in Kimberley, British Columbia she began to enjoy the sport of curling. By 1956 she was playing with team Ina Hansen which won the Primary Cup, Secondary Cup and grand aggregate in 1957. 1962 she was part of the team that won British Columbia provincial tournament and went on to earn the Canadian top title. In 1964 her team won the Canadian title and in special match won over championship men’s team. From 1960-67 she served on the British Columbia Ladies Curling Association executive including a term as president. In 1973 her team won n 1st Canadian ladies senior finals in Ottawa where she played with team members Ina Hansen (1920-    ), May Shaw and Barbara Weir. In 1976 she was inducted into the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977; Canadian Curling Hall of Fame. Online accessed February 2016
 
Gloria Campbell Gloria excelled at curling. She played second on championship teams skipped by Jill Greenwood when she won the 1993 title. In 1997 and 2000 she was a member of the Ontario winning Best Wester Intermediates for curlers over 40. She joined Ontario teams that Anne Dunn skipped to national title victory in 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. Gloria was inducted into the Canadian Curling Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. Source: Canadian Curling Hall of Fame. Online Accessed February 2016.
 
Anne Dunn née Vale. Born 1947, Toronto, Ontario. In 1967 Anne joined the Galt (Ontario) Curling Club. In 1973 she was skip of the local team winning the Ontario Provincial Championships. All in all as of 2014 Anne has played in 22 Provincial championships and has been Canadian Champion 8 times. In 2002 she was not only on the provincial championship team but the team also won the National Championships and went on to be World Seniors Ladies Champions. In April 2004 it was gold again at the World championships. Anne is a board member of the Cambridge Sports Hall of Fame Committee and needless to say a member of the Sports Hall of Fame itself. Source: Waterloo Region Hall of Fame Online (Accessed July 2014)
 
Marcia Gudereit

née Schiml Born Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan September 8, 1965. She enjoyed the sport of curling and in the 1990’s she joined Team Schmerler led by Sandra Schmerler (1963-200). The team would not only lead local rinks, provincial rinks and National rinks but would take 3 world championships in the sport in 1993, 1994 and 1997. In 1998 they would win the 1st gold medal ever presented for Curling in the Nagano Winter Olympic Games. The Team was inducted into the Curling Hall of Fame in 1999 and into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. Marcia continued curling when Jan took over the lead of the team after the death of Sandra in 2000. Sources: Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame online accessed July 2011.
 

Georgina 'Ina' Rutherford Hansen Born November 7, 1920, Boissevaine, Manitoba. Ina married Alvin Hansen and the couple have 2 children. She was British Columbia provincial champion 7 times and held 2 Canadian titles in 1960’s and was runner up twice. She served on the British Columbia’s Ladies’ Curling Association as an executive officer from 1955-1957 and as president in 1957.   Ina was inducted in the Canadian Curling Sport Hall of Fame in 1975.In 1977 she participated in the International Badminton World Championships.  Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Jennifer Judith Jones

Jennifer Judith Jones. Born July 7, 1974 Winnipeg, Manitoba. As a youth she enjoyed the sports of volleyball and curling. She decided to continue in the sport of curling while obtaining a degree as a lawyer from the University of Manitoba  and working as a Corporate lawyer. She married curler Brent Laing (1978-   ) and the couple have two daughters. The couple settled in Shanty Bay, Ontario. In 1991 she was a member of team that won the Manitoba Games Silver medal. By 1994 she was a Canadian Junior Team Champion. In 2002 she won the Manitoba Women’s Provincial Championships and went on to win the Canadian National Tournament of Hearts in 2002 and 2005. In 2006 she won the inaugural World Curling Tour Players Championship. She was also busy in 2008 winning the Tournament of Hearst and once again the World Championship as skip of her team. In the Winter Olympics, Sochi Japan she took gold and became the 1st female skip to go through the Games undefeated and she and her team were the 1st Manitoba based curling team to win Olympic Gold. Jennifer has wont the National Championships six time up to 2018 the Manitoba provincial championship eleven times and has competed thirteen times as of 2018 in 13 Tournament of Hearts. All these titles go along with 15 Grand Slam Curling wins on the World Curling Tour. In 2014 she inducted into the Order of Manitoba.  
 

Joan Elizabeth McCusker

née Inglis Born Yorkton, Saskatchewan June 8, 1965. In the early 1990’s she joined Sandra Schmirler (1963-2000) on the curling rink and they became one of the powerhouse teams in Canadian curling history. The Team would not only win Canadian Championships but went on to win 3 World Curling Championships in 1993, 1994 and 1997. In 1998 at the Nagano Olympic Winter Games they won the 1st Olympic Gold medal presented for the sport of Curling. Team Schmerler was the Canadian Press choice for Team of the Year. In 1999 they were inducted into the Curling Hall of Fame and the next year into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Joan became a commentator for the CBC events in curling. Married to Brian McCusker the couple have 3 children. Joan has become a motivational speaker and performance consultant and still enjoys curling. Sources:  Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame online accessed July 2011. JoanMccusker.com accessed July 2011.
 

June McDonald née Jamison. In 1962. June starred on Western Canada Interuniversity Athletic Union championship teams in golf, curling and volleyball during the course of her university career at the University of Alberta where she graduated in 1961.  She won city, provincial and national titles not only in golf but also in curling with national titles in 1966 and 1968. June went on to build the Junior Achievement organization of Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories into the 2nd largest such program in Canada. She served as a fundraiser for groups such as the Winnifred Stewart School, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Heart Fund and the Salvation Army.
 
Sandra Schmirler Born Biggar, Saskatchewan June 11, 1963.  Died March 2, 2000. Curling was her passion. She was a three time Canadian and World Champion.  The Schmirler team worked as a real sisterhood and dominated their sport for 6 years. As well as winning Canadian championships in their sport the Team won 3 World Curling championships in 1993, 1994 and 1997. In 1998 Schmirler  led her foursome, Joan McCuster (1965-    ) , Jan Betker (1960-   ) , Marcia Gudereit (1965-   ) and Atina Ford  to the 1st ever Olympic gold medal in women's curling. She and her team are members of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and she is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Cycling      back
Tanya Dubincoff Born November 7, 1969 Winnipeg, Manitoba. At four years of age she took the training wheels from her bicycle. She has won the Canadian National track cycling championship 16 times! She has won four gold medals at the Pan Am Games and has represented Canada in 3 Olympics. She was personally disappointed in her effort placement in Sydney's Olympics but she knew that retirement from competition was her future. In 1993 she was the first Canadian woman to win a cycling world championship and in that same year was first in World Cup standings. Tanya has since opened her own café, the Sugar Gallery Café and she has taken a position with The Olympic Oval in Calgary. She uses her communications skills and acts as a bridge between athletes and the media. What she gets most satisfaction from, however, is training young cyclists.
 
Shelley Gauthier

Para-cycling
Born 1968. In 2001, Shelly earned her degree in physiotherapy from the University of Toronto. Shelley was a practicing physiotherapist, when a mountain-bike accident left her in a coma for 6 weeks with severe head injuries. She leads an independent life as a hemiplegic with paralysis on one side of her body. Within a year of the accident, she was back on a bike as a para cyclist. By 2007, Shelley was competing in 50 kilometer races and, in 2009, she was the 1st female tricycle T1 rider on the international scene. In 2011 she was a silver medalist at the ParaPan American Games at Guadalajara and in 2012 she also took a silver medal at the Paralympian Games in London, England.  In 2014, she won both the road race and the individual time trial at the Union Cyclist Internationale World Championships in Greenville, South Carolina, U.S.A. That same year she was named Ontario Cycling Association Road Female Athlete of the Year and she launched the Shelley Gautier ParaSport Foundation, to provide encouragement and opportunities for people with disabilities to be participate in sport. In September 2014 she won the T1 World Road Race and ITT making her a double Para Cycling World Champion for 2014. In November 2014 she was named Female Cyclist of the Year by the Ontario Cycling Association. In 2015 Laureus World Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability Award from the Toronto Sport Hall of honour and the University of Toronto Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Alumni Association Above and Beyond Award.
 
Clara Hughes. Born September 27, 1972 Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was inspired watching Canadian Speed skater Gaetan Boucher at the 1888 Olympics to get into sports. By 1990 she began competing in cycling and by 2015 had been 18 times Canadian National Cycling champion.. She has silver and bronze medals from the 1991 and 1995 Pan American Games; a silver medal from the 1994 Commonwealth Games; a silver medal from the 1995 World Championships. In the 1996 Olympics she won 2 bronze medals which were Canada's first cycling medals in 100 years! She holds 6 Olympic medals in the sports of cycling and speed skating making her the 1st athlete in history to win multiple medals in both Summer and Winter Olympic Games. She felt privileged to carry the Canadian flag for the 2010 Canada Olympic Games.  She has also given personally to her causes. After winning Gold in 2006 Games she donated $10,000 to the Right to Play programs challenging Canadians to support the cause. In 2010 she again donated $10,000 personally to the Vancouver inner city school program, ‘Take a Hike’ which gives youth at risk a better direction in life. She became the National Spokesperson for Bell Canada’s Mental Health initiative and the Let’s Talk campaign. She shared her personal battles with depression to help break down the stigma associated with mental illness. She has been appointed to the Order of Manitoba and the Order of Canada. She was awarded the International Olympic Committees Sport and the Community award for her efforts promoting the values of sport and play around the globe. Since 2013 she has initiated annual bike rides across Canada in order to raise awareness for mental health. In 2001 Clara married Peter Guzman and in 2014 he cycled the annual cross country ride with his wife. Clara also has a Star on Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto. Sources: Clara Hughes, Olympian, Humanitarian, Motivator, Clara Hughes Website Online (accessed 2011) ; Gayle Macdonald, ‘On the eve of her cross-country bike tour, Clara Hughes speaks out about depression’, The Globe and Mail March 13, 2014.
 
Linda Jackson. Born November 13, 1961 Winnipeg, Manitoba. She enjoyed music as a child and studied music and theatre at the Banff School of Fine Art and after making her opera debut in 1982 transferred to the schools opera program. She launched her career at the San Francisco Opera, made her European debut in 1987and appeared at the Metropolitan Opera in 1991. She has made several recordings.
 
Genevieve Jeanson Born August 29, 1981 Lachine, Quebec. She began an interest in cycling in 1993. In 199 she became the first Canadian to win the Junior World Championship time trial and then won the road race itself. She has over 14 top titles to her credit. In her mid twenties she has the courage and determination to continue appearing in the winners circle in the future.
 
Lori-Ann Munenzer Born May 21, 1966 Toronto, Ontario. Although at 5’10” she is the shortest in her family it was never a drawback. It seems she was always on her bicycle. In 1987 she began Road Racing at the Toronto Cycling Club. In 1994 she embraced Veledrome Racing and became a member of the National Cycling Team. She has accumulated 13 National titles and 11 World Cup medals during her career. She has also earned medal at the Commonwealth Games in 1998 & 2002. She made her debut at the Olympics in 200. At the Olympic Games in Athens in 2004 she became the first Canadian to win a gold medal in Cycling. Selected as the Canada’s Female Athlete of the year in 2004 she was also the 2005 winner of the Lois E. Hole Lifetime Achievement Award from the YWCA. After the 2004 Games she began her own business called Pure Momentum which seeks to find and promote a community of female speakers. She has published her own biography and a documentary both called One Gear, No Breaks. Nomination and Information submitted by Wayne Mackenzie.
 
Tara Alice Whitten Born July 13, 1980. She enjoyed cross country skiing but began to take cycling track racing seriously in 2008. In truth she had dabbled in bike racing since 2005. In the 2008-2009 season she won two silver medals at the Track World Cup, Manchester, England and went on to win two bronze medals in Cali, Columbia and two silver medals in Copenhagen, Denmark. In March 2009 she won silver at the UCI Track Cycling World Championships, in Pruszkow, Poland and by December 2009 she had won the gold medal in the 2010 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics Women’s Team Pursuit. She was part of the Canadian team at the 2012 Summer Olympics winning bronze in the women’s team pursuit. In 2016 she was injured in Rio de Janeiro prior to the Summer Olympic Games. She would wear a brace for 9 weeks. On June 10, 2016 she was presented with her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Alberta. She took periodic breaks fro her studied to focus on cycling. She began a post-doctoral fellowship in concussion research at the University of Calgary, Alberta in 2016 and was officially named to the Canadian Olympic Team in cycling.
 
Diving      back
Irene Athans née Hartzell. At 14 Irene won provincial breaststroke swimming title and continued to win it for 10 years. Irene also held national level titles in simonized swimming 5 years in a w She met George Athans at a sporting event in the early 1930’s The medical doctor was an Olympian himself in 1936 and again in the 1940’s.The couple married in 1950 and settled in Kalona, British Columbia where they raised their  sons who would become Olympians and world champions in their own sports. After raising her children Irene returned to winning competing, winning and setting records at Master sport events for those over 50 years old. In 2009 the family was included into a special category of the Central Okanagan Sports Hall of Fame, in British Columbia.
 
Sylvie Bernier Born Quebec City, Quebec January 31, 1964. Sylvie was the first Canadian to win a medal in Olympic Diving.  She won the gold in the 3-meter springboard diving in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Beverly Boys Born July 4, 1951 Toronto, Ontario. For 10 years from 1966 to 1977 this diver won 34 Canadian championships in springboard and platform competition.  She holds gold medals from 1966, 1970, 1974 and 1978. Commonwealth Games and was a member of three Canadian Olympic teams. In 1968 she won two silver and a bonze medal at the Pan American Games in 1967 and 1971.  She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.  She was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 2005 and was named a Member of the Order of Canada in 2015. Beverly lived in Vancouver, British Columbia and is active as a coach and judge with BC Diving. (2018)
 
Elizabeth 'Liz' Ann Carruthers Born September 14, 1951, Edmonton, Alberta. When she was just 11 Liz took to swimming and diving. At 12 she beat the 100 yard Canadian record butterfly for her age group. At 13 she was competing in gymnastics and held Alberta and Saskatchewan junior novice senior gymnastic titles. In 1967 she was the Alberta springboard diving champion and was an alternate for the Pan-Am Games. In 1968 she won Canadian junior 3 meter diving board, gold medal and the 3 meter diving board in Prague, Czechoslovakia and in 1970 she took the gold medal in 3 meter diving board event at the British Commonwealth Games. In 1971 she earned the gold medal at the Pan Am Games in Cali, Columbia. She continued to participate in numerous international meets and was an alternate in the 1968 Olympics. In 1972 she made the Canadian team for the Olympics in Munich, Germany. In 1975 she won a silver medal. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977. (Posted Feb 2016)  
 
Anne-Josée Dionne. Born October 26, 1975. A member of the Canadian National Diving Team, Anne-Josée has been 9 times National Champion (in various age groups). She has also won medals at international events.  In 1993 she earned 3 gold medals at the Canada Games.  In her spare time she enjoys photography, movies, and camping. 
Irene Margaret MacDonald. Born November 22, 1933. Brought up in an orphanage in Hamilton, Ontario she reigned as Canada’s champion diver from 1951-1961. She won medals at the 1954 and 1958 Commonwealth Games and in 1956 she won Canada’s first Olympic diving medal, a bronze. She became a dedicated administrative supporter to the Canadian Diving fraternity. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, 1981, received the Order of British Columbia in 1991, was Female Athlete of the Year 1958, and won the YWCA Woman of Distinction for sport in 1998. The Irene MacDonald Fund was established for the support of children in diving.
Anne Montminy Born January 28, 1975.  A member of the national Canadian Diving Team, Anne has won 19 international medals to date.  She won the gold medal in the Junior World Championships and she is the Canadian record holder in Women's Platform Diving. 
 
Paige Parenti-Gordon née Gordon. Born April 23, 1973 North Vancouver, British Columbia. Paige was a member of the Vancouver Aquatic Centre Divers. She represented Canada in the 1992 and 1996 Olympic Games. She represented Canada at the 1990 and 1994 Commonwealth Games where I 194 she earned  silver medal in springboard diving and a silver medal at the 10 metre platform diving event. She was injured in 1995 and was personally disappointed in her showing at the 1996 Olympics. Now retired she is married to Ed Parenti and has one daughter. The family lives in San Francisco, California, U.S.A. where she is president of Paige Gordon Parenti Group Inc
 
Peggy Seller Born January 22, 1904. This Montreal athlete began her interest in sport by competing in track and hold provincial titles in javelin, broad jump and running relays. She also excelled in swimming and diving, holding the national record for the  3 meter diving championship. Perhaps her legacy is better shown in her writings of the rules  of synchronized swimming. 
 
Cinderella 'Cindy' Shatto

Born Toronto, Ontario June 16, 1957*. Died Florida, U.S.A. October 2, 2011. Cindy always enjoyed sports. At 2 she was roller skating! She took up playing the violin but continued in aerobatics and modern dance. It was diving, however that had her heart. From the age of 9 she  had her sights on the Olympics. There were no pools with diving boards in Toronto, so she lived in a train caboose in Peterborough in order to practice diving. She followed her coach from western Canada to Quebec for her sport training. She participated and won gold at numerous winter and summer national diving events. At 15 in 1973 she represented Canada at the world’s in Yugoslavia. In 1974 she took gold at the Commonwealth games. Bev Bays and Teri York took silver and bronze at the same event. In the 1976 Olympics in Canada she placed 5th but many contended that the judging was not impartial with the Soviet Union judge supporting the gold for her home contender. Judging rules changed after this event. Cindy married Bill Weingostner and the couple raised to sons. She is considered a true pioneer in her sport setting the stage for those who followed. Sources: Who’s Who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson (Prentice Hall 1977): Olympic Diver felt cheated out of medal by James Christie The Globe and Mail, October 5, 2011 page R 5 (Photograph included in article)  * Some Sources report her birthday as May 16.
 

Equestrian       back
Christilot Hanson Boylen Born April 1947, Djakarta, Indonesia. Christilot moved with her family to Canada in 1951.
She married James A, Boylen and the couple have1 child. Her love of horseback riding would make her 9 times Canadian dressage champion. At 17 she was the youngest competitor in Grand Prix Dressage at Tokyo OLYMPICS bronze medal at Pan-Am GAMES 1967.She earned individual gold medals at the 1971 and 1975 Pan Am Games and that same year she earned a team silver medal. She is the only athlete to achieve three individual gold medals in Pan Am history.  In 1972 she became the 1st Canadian rider to place among elite dozen riders in Olympic individual dressage. She won the U.S. National championships twice. She also holds numerous Ontario, Quebec, Eastern U.S. dressage titles. She has twice been horsewoman of the year of the National Equestrian Federation of Canada. She has written two books and produced a video about dressage and is one of the founders of the non-profit Canadian Dressage Owners and Riders Association (CADORA).
Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977.
 
Wendy Irving-Dell Born November 11, 1951, Ottawa, Ontario. Wendy was winning equestrian events starting in 1970. In 1971 she won team gold at Joker’s Hill team event at the Pan-Am Games. She participated in the 1972 Olympic Games, Munich, Germany but did not gain the podium. She is married to George Dell.  Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Gail E. Greenough Gail E. Greenough.  Born July 13, 1960 Edmonton, Alberta. She took up equestrian sports at age 11.  She joined the Canadian Equestrian Team in 1983 and July 13, 1986  became the 1st woman and 1st North American to win the World Show Jumping Championships. Her mount was a Hanovarioan named Mr. T. They took the gold medal as the 1st rider to have zero faults. At the time it was a shock to win in the Male dominated European circuit. She and Mr. T returned to Europe in the fall of 1986 and won the Grand Prix of Stuttgart in Germany. In the Olympic Games, Seoul, Korea she rode the horse Simon Says. In 1992 she focused on colour commentating for her sport for the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC). In 2001 she qualified to represent Canada in the 2003 Pan American Games but was injured and could not ride and after that she turned to coaching. She taught horsemanship in Calgary, Alberta and did clinics around the world. She was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada in 1990. (2018)
 
Fencing       back
Donna Jean Hennyey née Atkinson. Born April 10, 1942, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Donna earned her B.A. and her M.A. from the University of Toronto. Donna married Alex Richard Hennyey and the couple have 2 children. Donna joined the Canadian fencing team in 1967 and was Ontario female athlete of the year in 1968. She represented Canada at World championships 3 times. Pan-Am Games 3 times with the team earning a silver medal in Mexico in 1975. She participated in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She held the Ontario Provincial women’s champion title 6 times. Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Field Hockey       back
Marina van der Merwe Born February 7, 1937, Cape Town, South Africa. While coaching at the University of Toronto the women’s field hockey team to 9 championships. Working at York University he coached the women’s field and indoor hockey teams from 1971 to 1999. Leading her teams to 6 Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union (CIAU) silver medals, 2 CIAU bronze medals, and 7 Ontario University Athletics titles. Marina has received numerous CIAU and OUA Coach of the Year awards, and Canadian Interuniversity Sports named their Coach of the Year Award the Marina van der Merwe Award.  She has coached the Ontario Junior and Senior Provincial Squads and was the coach of the Canadian National Women’s Field Hockey Team for an incredible 19 years from 1976 to 1995. Marina developed the team into an international powerhouse and they become 2nd ranked in the world. Marina coached at 3 Olympic Games, 6 World Cups and 3 Pan Am Games. In 1994 and again in 1999 she was the CIS Field Hockey Coach of the year. In 2004 she was inducted into the York University Sport Hall of Fame. She was induced as an inaugural member of the Canadian Field Hockey Hall of Fame in 2014 and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. In 2015 she was inducted into the Toronto Sport Hall of Honour. Source: Canada Sport Hall of Fame. Online. Accessed February 2016.
 
   
Figure Skating      back
Patricia Kim Alletson

Born January 30, 1953 Brockville, Ontario. She loved to skate from when she was little. She joined the Minto Skating Club in Ottawa and after hours of hard practice she became a goad medalist in her club and in Eastern Ontario Championships. She skated on the national and international scene with the peal of her career being in the 1970’s when she was Canadian Champion in 1975 and 1976. She was a member of the Canadian Olympic Team in 1976  and she won the Skate Canada International Championships that same year. Suggested sources: Ferguson, Bob Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Scarborough; Prentice Hall, 1977
 

Frances Louise Bertram-Hulbig Born March 30, 1908 Toronto, Ontario. Died October 18, 1996 Toronto, Ontario. She and her partner Steward Reburn (1912-1976) were the 1935 Canadian pair figure skating champions. They were the 1st pair team to skate to music instead of using the music simply as a background. They would become known as the Fred Astair and Ginger Rogers of ice skating. The pair represented Canada at the 1936 Olympic Games, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, placing in 6th place. The partnership broke up beginning in 1938 when Stewart Reburn skated professionally with the famous skater Sonja Henie in her touring ice show. Louise married Sidney Melvin Hulbig on August 9, 1941 and the couple had one son. Louise and her partner Stewart Reburn are both members of the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.
 
Sandra Bezic Born Toronto, Ontario April 6, 1956. She and her brother Val loved to skate. So much so that they became involved in Canadian pairs skating. They were coached by renewed coach Ellen Burka. In 1967 they won the Canadian novice title. In 1969 they joined Canada’s international skate tem a position they showed they deserved when from 197- through 1974 they won the Canadian Seniors pairs titles. They represented Canada in the 1972 Olympics and placed a respectable 9th place. In 1973 they won the Zagreb international Skate for pairs. Then just prior to the 1976 Olympics a torn ankle ligament kept Sandra at home watching the Games. She and Val turned pro as one of the World’s pair skaters and skated in every major city in the world including Paris, New York, Paris, Moscow and Tokyo. Sandra continued her interest in skating by becoming a skate choreographer to such Canadian and international skaters as Barbara Underhill and Paul Martini, Brian Boitano and Kristi Yamaguchi and Kurt Browning. She also was choreographer for the traveling show Stars On Ice. Also over the years she has also enjoyed benign a specialist sports commentator at international events for NBC, ( a major U.S.A. Broadcasting company). She has written of her experiences in a book : Passion to Skate.
 
Shea-Lynn Bourne Born January 24, 1976 Chatham, Ontario. Shae-Lynn began skating in 1983 and competed in pair skating with Andrew Bertleff. Switching to ice dance and partnered with Victor Kraatz (1971-  ). The pair would be reigning champions in Canada winning 10 national titles between 1992 and 2002. They would compete in three Winter Olympic Games in 1994, 1998 and 2002 where they placed 4th. The couple were the 1st world Champions in Ice Dancing from North America to wing gold in the World Championships in 2003. The pair retired from competition after 2003 with Shae-Lynn has toured around the world skating professionally as a solo skater. She appeared on the TV reality skating show Battle of the Blades and made other notable TV appearances. She also enjoys coaching and doing choreography.   August 12, 2005 she married her skating coach Nikolai Morozov only to be divorce in July 2007. She married a second time to Bohdan Turok and the couple has one son. In 2007 they were inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.
 
Isabelle Brasseur. Born July 28, 1970 Kingsbury, Quebec.  Isabelle competed with Pascal Courchesne placing 5th at the 1985 Skate America before she teamed up with skating partner Lloyd Eisler (1963-   ) in 1987. This pair skaters are one of Canada’s finest pairs figure skating teams. They hold 5 Canadian Championships, 5 World Championship medals, and 2 Olympic Bronze medals in 1992 and 1994. In 1992 the pair teamed up with other skaters for form B.B.E. Productions Inc.(1992-2003) organizing professional figure skating events across Canada raising funds for the Children's Wish Foundation of Canada  with whom the pair had been National Spokespersons. The couple retired from formal competition in 1994 and that year they were awarded the Meritorious Service Decoration in the Civil Division, presented by the Governor General. In 1996 she was the co-author of the book;  Brasseur & Eisler: To Catch a Dream. A second follow-up book was called Brasseur & Eisler; the Professional Years.  October 8, 1996 she married pairs skater Rocky Marval (1965-   ) and the couple have one daughter. She became a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
 
Linda Braukmann

 

Coach

nee Scharfe. Born Vancouver, British Columbia. She began her coaching career in figure skating in 1951 in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. and moved on to coach in Lack Placid area of New York State, U.S.A. By 1962 she had returned to coach at the North Shore Winter club in Vancouver, British Columbia. Linda has coached throughout North America including in Baltimore U.S.A., Lace Placid U.S.A., Boston U.S.A.,  and Vancouver, British Columbia. Her coaching instructions always gave precise instructions. She was the coach for World Figure Skating Champion, Canadian Karen Magnussen and many more of her students have earned gold, silver, and bronze medals at national and international events. With Karen Magnussen she co-founded the Champion Way, Learn to Skate program.  She has been the co-author of numerous coaching manuals for both professional and amateur standards. She is a founding member of the British Columbia Coaches’ Association and the Professional Skating Association of Canada. She has sat on Skate Canada’s Skater development and the Olympic Program Best Ever 88 committees. Linda has been inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame and the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.  
 
Ellen Burka. Born August 11, 1921. Died September 12, 2016 Toronto, Ontario. Ellen was a Holocaust survivor during World War ll. Ellen immigrated to Canada from The Netherlands with her husband Jan and their children in 1951, Unfortunately Ellen and Jan became divorced in the 1950's. A coach of renown she has seen her efforts crowned at 26 Canadian Olympic and World Championships when her pupils have received medals.  Her own daughter Petra Burka was one of her winners. It was due to her efforts that dance and interpretation were introduced to the sport of figure skating.  Both family members are members of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. At 93 she still enjoyed coaching her athletes.
 
Petra Burka. Born November 17, 1946Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Petra immigrated to Canada with her family in 1951. When she was about 10 years old she began taking figure skating lessons. At the age of 15, at the 1962 Canadian Championships Petra became the 1st Canadian to complete the triple salchow jump in competition. Participating in the World Championships held in Prague Czechoslovakia that year she would place 4th. After winning the Canadian National Senior Women's title she participated at he the 1964 Olymmpic Games, Innsbruck, Austria  winning the Bronze Medal in figure skating.  1965 she won the Canadian, North American and World Championships and was voted by the Canadian Press as winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year and the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's Outstanding Athlete of tf the Year.  She became the 1st Canadian skater to perform in the Soviet Union she she did a two-week Tour appearing in Moscow and Kiev. She was the Gold medalist at the 1965 World Championships in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.A. becoming the 1st Canadian woman to win Worlds since Barbara Ann Scott in 1947. At the event, she also became the 1st woman to complete the triple Salchow at a World Championships. In 1965 she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Petra toured as a professional with an ice show until 1969.She went on to be a figure skating commentator and a coach.  In 1995 she was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Josée Chouinard. Born August 21, 1969.  She was 3 times Canadian figure skating champion.  She turned professional n 1994 and won the Canadian Professional Championships that same year and again in 1997.  She is an ambassador for the Heart & Stroke Foundation.  She married Jean-Michel Bombardier in 1997.
 
Frances Helen Dafoe - Mellick  Born January 17, 1929, Toronto, Ontario. In 1952 she and her partner Norris Bowden (1926-1991) placed second in the Pairs event at the figure skating championships. They would go on to place 1st a title they would hold through to 1955. In the 1952, their 1st Olympic appearance the couple place 5th . It was said that their style of skating featuring imaginative lifts and jumps was considered too “athletic” for the European judges. In 1953 they became the 1st Canadians to win the World Pairs Figure skating and they repeated another world win in 1954. They would hold the North American Championships titles from 1953-1956. In 1955 the pair were inducted into the Canada’s Sport Hall of Fame.  In the Cortina d’Ampezzo Olympics in 1956 they earned a silver medal. In 1958 the couple were inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. After her retirement from completion Frances had a successful career as a fashion designer. She remained involved in her sport as a judge, team leader and of course she enjoyed designing costumes for such Canadian greats as Toller Cranston. In 1991 she was inducted as a member of the Order of Canada. In 1993 the pair were inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame. Source: Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame Online (Accessed January 2013)
 
Wendy Elizabeth Griner-Ballantyne née Scharfe. Born April 16, 1944 Hamilton, Ontario. Wendy became the Canadian junior women’s Canadian Champion in 1959 and from 1960, when she was just 15, through 1963 she captured four Canadian Senior Ladies Champion titles. Wendy skated to second place in the 1962 World Figure Skating Championships and the following year won the North American Ladies title. From 1960 through 1963 she was the Ladies Canadian Champion. She participated for Canada in the 1960 Winter Olympic Games, Squaw Valley, California. U.S.A., where she was the youngest woman to represent Canada,  placing 12th and in the 1964 Winter Olympic Games, Innsbruck, Austria placing in 10th position. She retired from competitive skating in 1964 but did not turn professional as her father did not want her accepting show contracts. She married Dr. Don Ballantyne in 1967 and withdrew from the sport. The couple settled in Thunder Bay, Ontario and  Wendy devoted her time to family life.  When her children were teens she returned to school to study history at university. She was inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame in 2010.
 
Maria Jelinek-Harrington Born November 17, 1942, Prague, Czechoslovakia.  In 1948 she and her family fled the communist regime of Czechoslovakia.  In 1950 the brother and sister pair of Otto and Maria Jelinek decided to figure skate seriously. In 1962 they won the World’s Pairs figure skating title. In 1955   they won the Canadian Pairs title and came second at the senior level in 1956-57-58 and 1960. In 1961 and 62 they were Canadian Champions and were silver medalists at the worlds. They were a daring couple. Maria would go into a death spiral while Otto executed an axel jump, a maneuver that would come to be known as the 'Jelinek Death Spiral'. After retiring from competition the couple starred with the Ice Follies from 1963 through 1969. Maria married Paul Harrington and the couple have one son. In 1962 she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. In 1994 she was inducted into the Canadian Figure Skating Hall of Fame.
 
Cecile Elaine Eustance Smith Hedstrom

née Smith. Born September 14, 1908, Toronto, Ontario. Died 1997.Smith was the 1st woman to represent Canada at a Winter Olympic games. At 15 she participated in the 1924 International Winter Sports Week  January 25 to February 4,1924 in Chamonix, France, a precursor to the Winter Olympic Games, on behalf of Canada. In the women’s singles program, she finished in 6th place, two places ahead of the famous skater Sonja Henie of Norway. In the pairs competition  with partner Melville Rogers (1899-1973), she placed 7th.  She won the Canadian championship in 1925 and 1926. In 1928, she was once again at the Olympics and placed 5th in the women’s singles program while Sonja Henie claimed the gold. In 1930, she was the 1st Canadian to win a world championship figure skating medal when she placed 2nd with  the silver at a competition in New York City, New York, U.S.A. After retiring from competitive figure skating she went on to coach and judge her sport in Canada and the United States. In 1991 she was inducted into the Canadian Figure skating Hall of Fame.
 

Dorothy Jenkins Born 1889. Died 1973. Her mother, Anne Lampman,  sister of the Canadian writer Archibald Lampman (1861-1899), was also a musician who had studied in Europe and taught at the Canadian Conservatory in Ottawa, Ontario In 1923 with her partner Gordon MacLennan Dorothy won the North American Figure Skating Championship in the pairs event. She also was the Canadian singles ladies figure skating champion in 1922 and 1923. An accomplished musician she studied voice in Paris, France and returned to Canada in 1924 to perform and teach voice. Source; Canadian Women in History a Chronology by Moira Armour. Toronto: Green Dragon Press, 1993. (2017)
 
May Kearney née Simpson. Born 1924? Ottawa, Ontario. Died May 4, 1999. Kansas, U.S.A. At 10 she joined the Minto Skating Club in Ottawa and was soon appearing in the famous Minto Follies. She partnered with Jimmy Conyers and the couple appeared throughout North America performing  what was considered daring in those days as adagio, a routine featuring a series of lifts. At 20 she married Joseph Kearney, a trombone player who played in the live orchestras that performed at the Minto Follies. May continued traveling and performing after her marriage. The pair received offers of movie contracts but turned the offers down. May retired from the professional skating scene at 25 in order to have a family. After the birth of her daughter she worked as a house accountant for an Ottawa Law firm. May remained involved with the Minto Skating Club throughout her life helping generations of figure skater to benefit from her experience. May coached and judged and gave great support to youth in the sport.
 
Karen Diane Magnussen. Born North Vancouver, British Columbia April 4,1952. A accomplished free-skating performer, Karen was Canadian champion in 1968. She withdrew from 1969 world championships because of stress fractures in both legs but returned to become Canadian champion 1970-1973 and world champion in 1973.  The doll that was made and sold as the Karen Magnussen doll did not have any of the characteristics of the determined young athlete.
 
Elizabeth Manley. Born Belleville, Ontario August 7, 1965.  Canada's top female skater in 1987 and 1988  she would win the hearts of her home country at the 1988 Olympics in Calgary with a silver medal. Her home is Gloucester (Ottawa) Ontario where they have named an arena  after her. She continues to skate professionally and packs the arenas wherever she goes in Canada. She is known  as the tiny skater with the big heart. (Check out the paper dolls in the Famous Canadian Women pages).
 
E. V. 'Billie' Mitchell

Administrator
In 1961 Billie was elected chair of the British Columbia Section of the Canadian Figure Skating Association becoming the 1st woman on the national Board of Directors. She went on to be elected as the 1st woman on the executive and from 1976 through 1978 she served as the 1st woman to be president. During her career from 1961 through 1979 she was the Chief Accountant for the Canadian Figure Skating Association and felt great pride working on the scores for such champions as Karen Magnusson. As chair of the 1973 Canadian Championships she introduced the Parade of Champions. Billie is a member of of the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.
 
Suzanne 'Suzi' Morrow-Francis Born December 14, 1930 Toronto, Ontario.  Died June 11, 2006. She partnered with Wallace Diestelmeyer (1926-1999). This pair won the bronze medal at the 1948 Winter Olympic Games, St Moritz, Switzerland and the 1948 World Figure Skating Pairs Championship. This dynamic pair is credited with performing the 1st modern day death spiral in international competition. In 1949 through 1951 Suzanne was the Canadian Ladies singles champion. Finished with skating she earned her degree in veterinary medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario in 1952 and retired in 1995.Suzanne had one daughter.  She took up judging as an All-Breed dog show judge with the Canadian Kennel Club. After they retired from competition Suzanne continued in her sport as a coach and a judge for over 50 years in competitions including at the international level. At the 1988 Olympic Winter Games in Calgary, Alberta she became the 1st women to take the Judge’s Oath. Suzanne and Wallace Were inducted into the Skate Canada all of Fame in 1992.
 
Jennifer Robinson. Born December 2, 1976 Goderich, Ontario. Figure skating is her 1st love. Her heroine was Olympic medal winning skater Elizabeth Manly. Jennifer won the Canadian Junior Championship in 1994. In 1996 she won her 1st Canadian Senior Championship title. She has been Canadian ladies figure skating champion 6 times. In 2002 she married skating coach Shane Dennison and the couple have one daughter.  In 2004 she became a radio host on a Saturday night retro show in Barrie, Ontario. She was a commentator at the 2010 Winter Olympics, Vancouver, British Columbia for CTV. In October 2010 she was elected as a city counsellor in Barrie but poor health caused her to resign in 2012. Check out her official web site: http://skatinginc.com/Skaters/Robinson/
 
Jeannie Rochette Born January 13, 1986 Montreal, Quebec. Jeannie began skating when she was just two years old. In 1999-2000 she won the 200 Canadian Championships on the novice level. Between 2005 and 2010 Jeannie was Canadian National Figure Skating Champion. In 2009 Joannie too a Silver Medal at the World Figure Skating Championship. In 2010 she won the Olympic Bronze Medal in Vancouver, British Columbia  just days after her mother died of a heart Attack. That year the Canadian Press voted her the winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Athlete of the Year. In 2008 and again in 2009 she won was Silver medalist at the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships. In 2014 she was a colour commentator with the CBC for the Sochi Olympic Games in Russia. She attended McGill university to study medicine. She has been spokesperson for the iheartmo campaign at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute to raise awareness of heart disease in women. She has also worked with World Vision. In 2017 she was inducted into the ASkate Canada Hall of Fame.
 
Barbara Ann Scott. Barbara Ann Scott.  Born May 9, 1928, Ottawa, Ontario Died September 29, 2012 Amelia Island, Florida, U.S.A. At 10 she became the youngest skater ever to pass the fold figures test and the following year she won her 1st Canadian National Junior title. At 15 she was Canada's Senior National Champions holding the tile 1944 through 1946. In 1947 she became the 1st North American to win the European and World Figure Skating Championship and became Canadian Newsmaker of the Year. One of Canada’s best remembered sports personalities, in 1948 Barbara Ann won the Canadian Figure skating Championship, the European Championship, and became the 1st to hold consecutive World Championships. On February 2, 1948 , a week before the Olympic Games, she was on the cover of Time magazine. She won the gold medal in figure skating in the Olympic Games of 1948 on an outdoor rink in St Moritz, Switzerland, the 1st Gold medal in figure skating for Canada. That year she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. It is the only gold won by  a Canadian Woman in figure skating to date (2018).  She won the Lou Marsh Trophy in 1945, 1947,and 1948 as Canada's top athlete.  After the Olympics she toured North American and British ice shows as the headliner. February 4, 1952 her story was a feature in Life magazine.  She married Thomas Van Dyke King in 1955 and the couple settled in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.. That year she became a member of the Canada's Sport Hall of Fame. She opened a beauty salon  in Chicago and became interested in training horses. In the late 1950's she founded and was chancellor of the International Academy of Merchandising and Design in Toronto, Ontario. In 1966 she became a member of the Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame.  In the 1988 Calgary Olympic Games she was part of a group to carry the Olympic torch. In 1991 she was inducted into the Order of Canada the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.  In 2008 the Order of Ontario.  In 1996 the couple retired to Amelia Island, Florida, U.S.A. In 1997 she entered the International Women's Sport Hall of Fame and the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. The following year she received a Star on Canada's Walk of Fame in Toronto, Ontario. She remained involved in figure skating as a judge promoting her sport and encouraging many others to partake in the sport. Beginning in 1949 through 1999 she would appear as herself in various movies and TV shows. An area was named for her honour in Nepean (Ottawa), Ontario. In 2012 the city of Ottawa created the Barbara Ann Scott Gallery which displays photographs, her championship awards, and her gold medal which she donated to the city in 2011. The Barbara Ann Scott doll that came out shortly after the games did not really look too much like the young skater but it is today a very highly prized collector's item.
 
Cecil Elaine Eustace Smith-Hedstrom Born September 14, 1908 Toronto, Ontario. Died November 9, 1997 Toronto, Ontario. Cecile learned to ice skate at the Toronto Skating Club. In 1923 she placed second in the Ladies Singles in Canada. That same event she and partner Melville Roger (1899-1973) placed third in the pairs event At 15 she represented Canada at the 1924 Olympic Games becoming the 1st Canadian woman to participate in the Olympic Games. She placed 6th in the ladies singles and in the pairs she placed seventh. She went on to win the Canadian Ladies titles in 1925 and 1926. She placed second in the national events in 1927, 1929, 1931 and 1933. Again representing Canada in the 1928 Olympic Games she placed fifth. In 1930 she placed 2nd at the Women’s World Championship in New York City, U.S.A. making her the 1st Canadian woman to place in a top position in international figure skating competition. After retiring from competition she married and the couple had one son. She coached figure skating in the U.S.A. and Canada. In 1991 she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Carolyn Spellman- Fedy Born 1934. At the age of 5 Carolyn was skating at the Kitchener-Waterloo (Ontario) Skating Club and it would become a life long love affair. Carolyn attended teacher’s college and taught a few years before returning to the K-W Skating Club as a professional coach. She choreographed several K-W annual ice shows and worked with the famous Ice Capades shows. In 1964-5 she developed the 1st Canadian pre-school & mother skating program. Working with the National Testing Programme of the Canadian Figure Skating Association (CFSA) she developed CanSkate/CanFigureSkate programs that are used nationally. In 1983 she began conducting clinics for coaches, trainers and administrators across Canada. In 1990 she was Coach of the Year for the University of Western Ontario and in 1992 Female Coach of the Year for Ontario. In 1996 the CFSA presented her with an Award of Excellence. She retired in 1999. She is a member of the Waterloo Region Hall of Fame.  The City of Waterloo has named a skating rink in her honour. Source: Waterloo Region Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed July 2014)
 
Sandra Tewksbury

Born Chatham, Ontario 1942 (?) Died June 1962. At nine years of age she joined the Chatham Figure Skating Club and was recognized as a talent. At 11, she was the youngest skater to win the Canadian Figure Skating Silver Dance Medal. In 1959 she was very busy, placing third in the Canadian Figure Skating Championships and 5th in the North American Championships and then being first in the trial for the Olympic Games. She placed 10th overall in the women’s figure skate at the Squaw Valley Olympics. Shortly after she was married, Sandra Tewksbury Ritchie died in an automobile accident when she was 20 years old.
 

Mary Rose Thacker-Temple Born 1922. Died August 5, 1983 Victoria, British Columbia.  Mary Rose began skating in Winnipeg when she was just three years old and appeared in ice shows when she was four. At thirteen she was the skating Senior Ladies Champion of the Winnipeg Winter Club, a title she held for seven years. She won the Canadian Junior title a year later. In  she won the Canadian National Championships in figure skating in 1939 and again in both 1941, when she defeated the young and upcoming Barbara Ann Scott (1928-2012), and 1942. She won the North American Figure Skating Championships in 1939 and in 1941. In 1939 and again in 1941 the Canadian Press Awarded Mary Rose the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete. Mary Rose retired from competition in 1942 appearing in Ice show throughout North America and later began coaching. Settling in British Columbia she founded a skating school in 1947 which she ran successfully for the next 35 years. In 1952 she became the professional at the Victoria Skating Club. She married in the early 1950's and had a daughter.  She was proud of her students and coached such notables as champion skater Karen Magnusson.  In 1984 she was inducted into the Manitoba Sport Hall of Fame and in 1995 she was inducted into the Canadian Figure Skating Hall of Fame.
 
Barbara Ann Underhill. Born June 24, 1963 Pembroke, Ontario. With her skating partner, Paul Martini (1960-   ) she would win five consecutive Canadian Pairs Championships. In 1978 they won gold at the World Junior Championships, Megeve, France and the following year they won their 1st senior national title and made their World Championship debut in 11th place. They were Olympians in 1980, Lake Placid, New York, U.S.A. where they placed 9th. They were third in the 1983 Words and  won the World Championships on home ice in Ottawa March 20-25. She Married hockey coach Rick Gaetz and the couple have three children. Sadly one of her twin daughters drowned in 1993. Barbara started the Stephanie Gaetz Keepsafe Foundation to reduce injuries in childhood, with a focus on water safety. Barbara worked 16 years as a skating TV commentator, retiring in 2006. She worked with young Canadian hockey players helping to develop speed and power. They turned professional and worked with Ice Capades after their amateur successes. They are both members of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. In 2009 she was named to the World Figure Skating Hall of Fame. In 2011 she was named by the Hockey News as one of the 100 most influential people in ice hockey. April 20, 2012 she joined the Toronto Maple Leaf's as a skating consultant.
 
Barbara Aileen Wagner. Born May 5, 1938 Toronto, Ontario.  In 1952 she and Robert Paul formed one of Canada’s most successful figure skating pairs.  They began skating in 1952 and in 1957 won the Canadian, American and World Championships. So spectacular was their gold medal routine at the 1960 Olympics in Squaw Valley, California, U.S.A. that 7 judges ranked them first place.  This was the 1st time that the gold had gone to non-European pair skaters.  They are both members of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Barbara married figure skater James Grogan and the couple steeled in Alpharetta , Georgia, U.S.A. (2018)
 
Tracey Wainman Born May 27, 1967. At 12 she won her 1st national medal, a Bronze Medal, at the 1980 Canadian Championships and went on to win two  Canadian Women's Figure Skating Champion.    In 1981 she relocated to Orillia, Ontario to work with coach Brian Orser and won the1981 Skate Canada International Championship. That year the Canadian Press voted her winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year. She stopped skating in 1985 returning in February 1986 winning second place in the national competition. She soon retired from competition and skated professionally with ice show including Holiday on Ice and Ice Capades. In 1987 she married Jozef Sabovcik, a Czechoslovakian skater, and the couple have one son. She has also worked as a skating coach and slating director at the York Region Skating Academy, Richmond Hill, Ontario. She divorced in 1993. She was the COS Competitive Coach of the Year in 2002 and again in 2006. In 2011 she was Skate Canada's  Competitive Coach of Excellence.
 
Debbi Wilkes Born December 16, 1946 Toronto, Ontario. Debbi  took  to skating when she was just five years old. She skated with her 1st partner when she was ten but was left alone when her partner quit.   She skated with her partner Guy Revell (1941-1981) in 1958 after meeting at the Unionville Skating Carnival. That year they won the Canadian Junior Pairs Championship. In 1963 and again in 1964 the couple were the Canadian Champions . Their innovative skating style pioneered new techniques including the double loop twist.  The pair were also 1963 North American Champions. At the World Championships in 1963 she fell hitting her head on the ice and fractured her skull. The pair withdrew from competition only to return the following year to earn the bronze medal at the 1964 Winter Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria which was updated to a silver in 1966. They  were one of the youngest Canadian pairs to have claimed such success.  They followed this with a second bronze at the World Championships that same year. I She would at tend York University, Toronto and go on to earn a Master’s degree in communications at Michigan State University, East Lancing, Michigan, U.S.A. She married Bruce McEwan. Debbi went on to coach skating and for many years was a colour commentator for her sport. She has also published  guides to figure skating, Ice Time: a Portrait of Figure Skating in 1994, and Skating Superstars in 2006.
 
Jean Wilson Born July 19, 1910 Glasgow, Scotland. Died September 3, 1933 Toronto, Ontario. When just a child Jean emigrated to Canada with her family. When she was 15 she began to skate.  In 1931 she was the North American indoor speed skating champion. At the 1932 Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, U.S.A., when women’s speed skating was a demonstration sport, Jean won the 500m race in 58 seconds and came second in the 1500 m event.  At only 23 years of age she died from a progressive muscular disease. In 1934 the Jean Wilson Trophy for indoor women's speed skating was created by the Toronto Telegram newspaper. She was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1955. (2018)
 
Tracy Wilson Born September 25, 1961 Lachine, Quebec. Tracy grew up in British Columbia. As a child she enjoyed all sports including swimming in summer and skating in winter. At fifteen she entered her 1st ice dance competition. In 1980 she and partner Mark Stokes won the Canadian Junior Dance title. The following year she teamed up with Rob McCall (1958-1991) training at the Elgin Barrow Arena in Richmond Hill, Ontario. This pair won the Canadian Championships seven times between 1982 and 1988. They won the Skate Canada International competition in 1983 and 1987. The pair took bronze medals three times from 1986 to 1988. They competed in the  Olympic Games in 1984 and in 1988 where they won a bronze medal the 1st medal in Olympic ice dance for Canada.   In 1987 she married Brad Kinsella but professionally retained her maiden name.  The couple has three children. After the 1988 World Championships Tracy turned professional and in 1988 the couple won the World Professional Championships. Even after being diagnosed with AIDS in 1990 the couple continued to skate in ice dance skating in the 1990 World Professional Championships. In 1991 she stopped skating to have a family and retired from competition after the death of Rob McCall. On November 21 1992 she skated a solo performance while pregnant, at a tribute to her former partner. She coaches at the Toronto Cricket Curling Club and works at special events as a colour commentator for her sport with the CBC.
 
Constance Wilson Samuel Born January 7, 1908 Toronto, Ontario. Died February 28, 1953, Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.A. Constance would win the Canadian Championship in senior Ladies events 9 times from 1924 through 1935. In the 1928 Winter Olympic Games, St Moritz, Switzerland she placed 6th. By 1932 she would take bronze at the World Figure Skating Championships, and 4th in the Olympic Games, Lake Placid, New York, U.S.A. She skated in pairs events with her brother Montgomery Wilson (1909-1964) to win four North American Titles in 1929, 1930, 1931 and 1933. Together the brother and sister won five Canadian Championships in pairs from 1929-1934. In 1990 she was inducted into the Skate Canada (Canadian Figure Skating) Hall of Fame.
 
Golf      back
Gayle Hitchens Borthwick Born December 3, 1944, Regina, Saskatchewan. The family relocated to British Columbia and Gayle, in 1961 won the Canadian Junior Girls Golf Championship. She won the  British Columbia where she won the provincial Ladies’ Golf title in 1962 and then went on to win the ladies’ Canadian Amateur title. She defended her provincial titles in 1963. In 1994 she was the Canadian Ladies Senior golf champion. In 1994 she tool the Canadian Ladies’ senior championship, a title she successfully defended in 1995, 1999 and 2000. In Ontario she won the Ontario Senior Ladies’ Championship in 1994, 1996, 1998. 2000 and 2001.  In 1996 she won her 1st international solo title, as the U.S. Women’s Senior Champion which she won again in 1998. She has been a member of numerous team spanning four decades. She has relocated to Ontario where she volunteers in golf administration and in fundraising.  She was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1997. (2018)
 
Jocelyn Bourassa

Born May 30, 1947, Shawinigan Quebec. Jocelyne embraced sports all through her childhood. She attended the University of Montreal and then the University of Wisconsin in the U.S.A. She enjoyed an active sports life at both universities staring in basketball, volleyball, skiing, and track and field. During her years at Wisconsin she earned the nickname “Frenchie”. Her interest in golf actually stared in the early1960’s when she was a caddy for her brother Gilles. She earned the Quebec provincial junior championships in 1963-1965 and she was hooked for life on competitive golf. She would win provincial amateur championships, the Canadian ladies amateur championships in 1965, and 1971. She was a member of the Canadian team winning the World Cup in Spain in 1971 and then on to win the New Zealand amateur title. In 1972 she turned pro and earned the honour of “Rookie of the Year” in the Ladies Pro Golf Association. She was the 1st woman to be named as the Quebec Athlete of the Year and in 1972 was the Canadian Female Athlete of the year. In 1973 she was inducted into the Order of Canada.   From 1980 through 2000 she was the executive director of the du Maurier Ltd. Classic which is one of the Ladies Profession Golf Association (LPGA)’s 4 major championships. She holds the Royal Order of Merit of Canada and in 1992 she was inducted into the Quebec Sports hall of Fame. In1993 she was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame .In 2009 she was presented with the Eloise Trainor award from the LPGA and in 2015 she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall) : Royal Canadian Golf Association. Canadian Golf Hall of Fame www.rcga.org/hall_of_fame (accessed February 2009)
 

Alexa Stirling Fraser née Stirling. Born September 5, 1897 Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. Died April 15, 1977, Ottawa, Ontario. As a child she was an accomplished violinist and showed promise on the golf course. Prior to moving to Ottawa she had won 3 U.S. Ladies’ Amateur Golf titles. She married a Canadian doctor and relocating to Ottawa she earned 2 Canadian Ladies Amateur championship titles in 1920 and 1934 and was runner up in 1921 and 1925. She married Dr.  Wilber A. Fraser and the couple had 3 children. She was a member of the Royal Ottawa Golf Club where she won the ladies’ club championship nine times. In 1978 she was been inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame and in 1986 she entered the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. In 2004 a movie about her golfing friend, Bobby Jones: A Stroke of Genius had Stephanie Sparke portray Alexa.
 
Florence Harvey Born 1878 Hamilton, Ontario. Died 1968. She excelled in her sport of Golf as a competitor and gave back to it her energies to help the sport evolve for women in Canada. She was Ontario Ladies Amateur Champion 1904, 1906, 1913, and 1914. She was also Canadian Ladies Champion in 1903 and 1904 and placed as runner up in both 1911 and 1913. She was a great advocate of her sport. She founded and served on the executive of the Canadian Ladies Golf Union, now known as the Canadian Ladies Golf Association. During World War I she organized women golfers to raise money to purchase an ambulance to be used in Serbia. In 1972 she became  a member of Canada's Golf Hall of Fame.
 
Dorothy Campbell Hurd Howe

Born 1883 Troon, Scotland. Died 1946. She embraced the sport of golfing in her home country. Prior to emigrating to Canada in 1910 she held numerous titles in both Scotland and Britain. In 1910 she was the first person to win three national titles: The Canadian, The U.S.A., and the British amateur championships. She went on to win the 1911 and 1912 Canadian Ladies Amateur Championships. She married in 1912 and moved to the U.S.A. where she took the Ladies Amateur title again in 1924. She is considered on of the most successful lady golfers of the first quarter of the the 2oth century. She was induced into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1991 and is also a member of the world Gold Hall of Fame. Source: Royal Canadian Golf Association http://www/rcga.org.hall_of_famer (accessed February 2009)
 

Dora Jean Darling née Virtue. Born August 4, 1904 Montreal, Quebec. Died ????. Dora began golfing at 14.  Dora played golf at the Whitlock Golf Club where her father was the 1st president of the club. She would win 10 Ladies Club Championships Dora was Quebec Ladies Golf Champion in 1928. Eight years later in 1936 she captured the Canadian Ladies  Open Champion and the following year she was runner-up in the Canadian Ladies Closed Championship. She was also the champion of the Canadian Women's Senior Golf Association three times and a runner-up twice.  She married Arthur Belfour 'Bill' Darling and the couple had three children.
Both parents enjoyed introducing their children to their sport of golf. (2018)
 
Judith 'Judy' Kathleen Darling-Evans née Darling. Born October 6, 1937 Montreal, Quebec. She was educated at the private school known as The Study, in Montreal prior to attending McGill University to earn a Bachelor degree in science.  She was part of a golfing family and in the 1950’s she often won her home club junior championships. She won the Quebec Junior Champion in 1956 and that same year she claimed the Quebec Ladies championship. She won the Canadian Junior Girls Championship in 1957. She went on to win the Canadian Ladies Open championships in 1960 and 1961. She was a member of the Canadian team representing Canada at the Commonwealth Matches in 1956 and again in 1962.  She married John Douglas Evans and the couple had 4 children. Judy was inducted into the Quebec Golf Hall of Fame in 1998 and in 2017 she became a member of the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame.(2018)
 
Lorie Kane Born December 19, 1964 Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. In 1982 to 1985 she won the Junior Girls Provincial titles in golf. She went on to win the PEI Womens’ Amateur Champion from 1987-1992 and then captured the National Ladies Amateur title from 1996-1999 and again in 2001. In 1997 she made her first appearance at a tournament in the Ladies Professional Golf Association and has won tournaments in the LPGA tournaments through 2004. In 1998 she received the Heather Farr Perservance Award and a four-time LPGA Tour winner. She also received the William and Mousie Powell Award in recognition of her exemplary spirit of the LPGA. She has won the LPGA Legends Tour four times. In 2016 she was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame.
 
Angela Kelly

Born Scotland October 3, 1971. Her hometown was Brantford, Ontario where she finished high school at North Park Collegiate before attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A. She was an assistant coach for the women’s soccer team while she studied. She graduated in 1994. From 1989 through 1996 she was a member of the Canadian women’s national soccer team. Re-establishing herself at the University of Tennessee in January 2000 she became a popular and winning coach of the university’s VOLS ladies Soccer team. She was inducted into the Brantford and Area Sports Hall of Recognition and the  Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame in 2004.  Sources: The Brantford Public Library, Famous local Sportsmen http://www.brantford.library.on.ca/genealogy/famoussports (accessed October 2008) : University of Tennessee Women’s Soccer Official website utladyvols.com (Accessed October 2008)
 

Ada Mackenzie Born Toronto, Ontario October 31, 1891. Died October 25, 1973.  She would win the Ontario Ladies Amateur Golf title 9 times and the Canadian Ladies Open Amateur  title 5 times.  In 1933 she was declared the Canadian Athlete of the Year.  She would open a ladies only golf club in Thornhill, Ontario in May 1925.  This sporting pioneer with her club and her leading titles would make ladies golf a sport to be taken seriously.
 
Gail Harvey Moore née Harvey. Born June 13, 1943 Ontario. Died 1993. As a teen she won three consecutive Junior National gold titles beginning in 1958. She would play on 21 provincial teams between her home provinces of Ontario and British Columbia. She was Canadian Ladies Closed Champion in 1964-1965. She moved with her husband to British Columbia in 1966. In She holds two National Ladies’ Close titles and the 1970 Canadian Ladies’ Open title. In 1979, representing Canada she won the Commonwealth team event. In 1998 she became a member of the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. In 2004 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Marilyn Palmer O'Connor Born December 17, 1946 Vancouver, British Columbia. Marilyn was the British Columbia Provincial Junior Ladies Champion in 1963,1964 and 1965. She followed this up in 1965 and 1966 with being the BC Ladies Golf Champion. In 1966 she to the title in the Canadian Ladies’ Close. From 1968 through 1979 she played on World Amateur Teams, and Commonwealth Games teams. She began to play internationally in 1971 and has played in New Zealand, Great Britain and the United States.  In 1973 she took top ladies position at the Pacific Northwest Gold Championship. In 1986 she held the Canadian Ladies’ Amateur Championship title and was part of the Canadian Ladies’ Foursome Championship team.  In 1983 through 1994 she held the Alberta Ladies’ Championship title six times.  She became a member of the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1999. (2018)
 
Sandra Post. Born June 4, 1948 Oakville, Ontario. Sandra was introduced to the sport of golf by her father when she was just five year5s old. By the time she was 13 she was competing in her home province of Ontario as an outstanding junior and amateur winning the Ontario and Canadian Junior Girls Championships three times each.  She became Canada’s 1st woman professional golfer in 1968 and won the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Championship at Sutton Massachusetts that same year. It can be no surprise that she won Rookie of the year Award in 1968.  In 1970 she married John Elliot, Jr.  In 1974 she won the Colgate Far East Open in Melbourne, Australia breaking into international circuit.   Sandra was the 1st Canadian Ladies golfer to win the LPGA multiple times in the same season winning twice the 1st tow time a Canadian performed this feat in 1978 and 1979.  In 1979 she was awarded the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s Athlete of the Year. Sandra has bee captain of the Canadian Nations Cup team, served as a professional golf commentator in Canada and she also writes instructional articles for her sport in several Golfing magazines. She retired from most LPGA competition in the mid 1980's due to several nagging injuries. In 1988 she was elected to the Canada Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. In 2004 Sandra became a Member of the Order of Canada. She was also identifies as number eight of the women chosen as Canada's Athletes of the 20th Century. Sandra runs her own School of Golf, she  has her own golf apparel firm, and she has designed a set of women's golf clubs for a major company.
 
Judy Sams. Born Toronto, Ontario October 7, 1947. Judy began playing golf when she was just 13. In 1979, while she was a junior at Ohio State University in the U.S.A., she won the Midwest Region Championship. In 1980 she won the Ontario Amateur title and was Canadian amateur-of-the-year. She graduated from Ohio State with a Bachelor of Science in education and recreation.  She Married William Ralph Sams and the couple had one daughter.   in 2003 she began working as a golf instructor at the Ben Sutton Golf School, Sarasota, Florida. (2018)
 
Alena Sharp Born March 7, 1981 Hamilton, Ontario. In 1999 she was the Ontario and Canadian Amateur Champion. Alena graduated from New Mexico State University, Los Cruces, New Mexico where when she was not hitting the books was found on she golf course. In 2003 Alena earned the Edith Cummings Munson Golf Award presented to one of the top collegiate female golfers who excels in academics from the National Golf Coached Association (NGCA). In 2003 she turned professional. In 2004 and again in 2005 she won the Canadian Professional Golf Association (PGA) Championship.  She joined the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Tour in 2005. In 2008 she represented Canada in the World Cup competition After this he career stagnated and she began consulting sports psychologists to buoy her depleted confidence.  Alena met her partner playing hockey in Arizona and she became her caddy. In 2016 she was a member of the Canadian Olympic Team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil which encouraged her to eye the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. In 2017 she courageously outed herself as a lesbian woman recognizing her story had to be told.
 
Cathy Sherk Born Bancroft. Ontario June 17,1950. She loved her chosen sport of golf. In 1977 Cathy  claimed her first Canadian Women’s golf title. In 1978 she was the U.S. Amateur and Medalist at the World Amateur. Golf Digest named he the World’s no. 1 Woman Amateur. She also received the Velma Springstead Trophy for outstanding Canadian Athelete of the year. She joined the Ladies Profession Golfing Association Tour and was a key player for many years. After retiring from the LPGA in 1983 she worked closely with the Canadian Ladies Golf Association junior program. She still had time to reign as  the 1986, 1987 and 1990 CPGA Champion.  From 1995 through 1999 she was the National Coach of the CLGA. In 1995 she was inducted into the Royal Canadian Golf Hall of Fame.  Source: Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. (Online accessed February 2002.
 
Betty Stanhope-Cole née Stanhope. Born September 21, 1937 Calgary, Alberta. Betty won the Alberta Junior golf title 5 times and the Edmonton City Golf tournament titles 29 times from the 1950’s through the 1970’s. In 1957 she was Edmonton’s Outstanding Athlete of the Year.   As well she was the winner of the Alberta Open tournament 12 times and she went on to be Canadian Junior champion in 1956 and Canadian Open champion in 1957. She claimed the Saskatchewan Open in 1966 and went on to play on the Alberta Interprovincial Team 18 times., Ontario and Saskatchewan teams twice the Canadian Commonwealth team in 1963 and 1971 and the Canadian world team in 1964, 1974 and 1976. She was considered Canada’s number 1 player in 1974. Betty is a member of the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. Betty also enjoys curling and skipped the winning team in Edmonton in 1971 and 1975. She also skipped the Alberta Provincial Curling Champions in 1970, 1973 and was runner up in 1972.  Married Gordon Cole and the couple have 2 children. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977);
 
Marlene Streit. née Stewart. Born March 9, 1934 Cereal, Alberta. A powerful golfer she would win the Canadian ladies champion title 11 times between 1951 and 1973. She was the Canadian Female Athlete of the Year in 1951 and 1956. In 1967 she was inducted as an officer in the Order of Canada. In 1971 she was inducted into Canada's Sport Hall of Fame followed by the Ontario Sport Hall of Fame in 1995. During her golfing career she would win 24 Canadian Ladies Golf Association Championships and by 2003 she had a career total of 30 national or international championships with at least one championship each decade . She claimed her third U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur in 2003, the oldest person to ever triumph in that event. She is the only person to have won the Australian, British, Canadian and United States womens’ amateur championships!  In 2004 she became the first Canadian member of the World Golf Hall of Fame. In 2006 she became a Member of the Order of Ontario.

 
Alexa Stirling-Fraser Born September 5, 1897 Atlanta Georgia, U.S.A. . Died April 15, 1977 Ottawa, Ontario. Alexa won the U. S. Women's Amateur Golf Championships in 1916, 1919, and again in 1920. She won the Canadian Women's Amateur Ladies title in 1920 and again in 1934. During World War l she and a small group of other golfers were known as the Dixie Chicks who toured around the U.S.A. giving golfing exhibitions to raise money for the Red Cross. In 1925 she married Canadian doctor Wilbert G. Fraser and the couple settled in Ottawa, Ontario. She was ladies champion at the Royal Ottawa Golf Club nine times. In 1978 she was inducted into the Georgia (U.S.A) Sports Hall of Fame and in 1986 she was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame followed in 1989 with induction into the Georgia (U.S.A.) Golf Hall of Fame.
 
Violet Pooley Sweeny

Born Dec. 18, 1886, Victoria,  British Columbia; Died March 19, 1965, West Vancouver, British Columbia . Violet first played Golf as a child of eight years. .She would play for more than thirty years. In 1905, she won the first of seven Pacific Northwest and nine B.C. championships. She moved to Vancouver, and in 1915  and married “Bimbo” Sedley Campbell Sweeny (1888- 1966), a famed rugby player and rower. She sold cars for Consolidated Motors, then demonstrated the basics of the golf swing at McLennan, McFeeley & Prior sports and hardware store. "It has been said “She didn't hesitate to raise eye brows and hemlines ... she simply did her own thing." In 1936 she funded the Sweeny Cup for ladies Golf for those with a 10 and under handicap. From 1933 through 1942 she was president of the Canadian Ladies Golf Association. She was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1998.  After having been honoured by the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame in 1974. Sources: The Sweeny Cup http://sweenycup.shawwebspace.ca/pages/view/sweeny_cup_history/ (Accessed November 2012) . Suggested reading:  Backspin, 100 Years of Golf in B.C. by Arv Olson.
 

Mabel Gordon Thomson Born September 28, 1874 Saint John, New Brunswick. Died August 13, 1950. Mabel was one the Canada Maritimes’ greatest golfers. She played prior to the founding of the Maritime Golf Association and records of her local credit wins are recorded as being between 5 to 9 Maritime titles from 1905 to 1911.  She won five Canadian Ladies’ Amateur Championships between 1902 and 1908. She would go on to represent Canada on teams playing against the United States and Great Britain in the early decades of the 20th Century. She was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1986.
 
Margaret Todd née Sutcliffe  Born May 31, 1918 Montreal, Quebec. Her home golf club was the Victoria Golf Club, Victoria, British Columbia. She won a total of three British Columbia Ladies Amateur Golf tournaments from 1947-1949 and went on to win two Senior Ladies national titles. She was a member of the 1st Canadian team to Great Britain. She served in the Canadian Ladies Golf Association (CLGA) in various capacities including the National Director of Rules in 1984-1986. She was the Commonwealth and World Amateur Delegate in 1964, 1970, 1984 and 1992. In 1989 she was Director of the British Columbia Golf Museum. She was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame in 1974, Canadian Golf Hall of Fame in 1996, and he British Columbia Golf Hall of Fame in 2001.  
 
Lisa Young Walters née Young. Born January 9, 1960 Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Lisa won several amateur golf tournaments in her home province including three straight BC Ladies Championships, Junior and Senior in 1977, 1979, 1980, and 1981. While attending Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.A. she participated in college golf and was an All-American in 1981.  She joined the Ladies Professional Golf Association in 1984 and won three ladies’ titles between 1992 through 1998. In 1988 she married and played under her married name, Walters.  In 2008 she was inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Gymnastics
Sherry Hawco-Delanty

(née Hawco) Born 1964, Cambridge, Ontario. Died October 29, 1991, Cambridge, Ontario. From 1977 through 1983 Sherry was a member of the Canadian National Gymnastic team. She won both junior and senior provincial championship titles. At 15 she was competing at international meets. She excelled in floor exercises. In 1978 she took gold at the Commonwealth Games for team and individual events. She was chosen as a member of the 1980 Canadian Olympic Team but Canada did not participate in the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games but she was recognized by the Ontario Gymnastic Association with an Olympic Life Membership Award. She is a member of the Waterloo Region Hall of Fame. She Married Mark Delanty. She became ill with breast cancer and finding she was pregnant decided to see through her pregnancy. Against doctors orders she gave birth to her son Brandon just weeks prior to her death. Sources: Waterloo Region Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed July 2014) ; Obituary, Winnipeg Free Press October 30, 1991. Online (Accessed September 1, 2014) 
 

Jennifer Marie Diachun-Palmer née Diachun. Born August 14, 1953, Toronto, Ontario. U OF T, U B.C. 1969-1972 and 1974 Canadian champion in gymnastics. Canadian Intercollegiate champion 1973, and 1076. Represented Canada in the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Games. In 1971 at the Pan-Am Games she earned 2 bronze medals. She also represented Canada in events in China, Russia. In 1975 she was outstanding person with the Ontario Gymnastics Federation winning the Dr. Gene Sutton Special Achievement Award presented to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution of an exceptional nature to the Sport of Gymnastics in Ontario. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977.
 
Gene Sutton née Dawdy. Born 1945. Died August 2, 2009 Hamilton, Ontario. Gene chose as her 1st occupation to be a teacher after completing her Master’s degree in Physical Education and a Doctorate in Sport Psychology. It was however her passion for gymnastics that gave her drive.  Gene dedicated countless hours to gymnastics programs in Ontario and across Canada, and was respected around the world for her commitment to Olympic education.  She was President of the Gymnastics Ontario in 1997-1998 and a board member and vice-chair of Gymnastics Canada for several years. She also served as team manager at multiple events and became a judge at international events. She was chair of the Women’s Artistic Technical Committee and WPC Judging Chair for several years.  She won the Gymnastics Ontario Special Achievement Award in 1991. In 2003 she was Canada’s Chef de Mission at the Pan Am Games.  She also served on the Executive Board of the Canadian Olympic Committee. In 2009 the award for outstanding volunteer service presented annually by the Ontario Gymnastic Association to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution of an exceptional nature to the Sport of Gymnastics in Ontario was named in her honour. Sources: Gene Sutton, Amateur sports Icon, dies. Hamilton Spectator, August 3, 2009; Gene Sutton on Lifenews.ca Online Accessed March 2016.

 
Ernestine Russell Weaver née Russell. Born Windsor, Ontario, June 10, 1938.At 16 she won the Velma Springstead Award as Canada’s Outstanding Woman Athlete of the Year for 1953. She would win again in 1954 and 1955. At 18 she was the first Canadian woman to participate in gymnastics in the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia. In 1959 when gymnastics were introduced to the Pan American Games she dominated the field by winning four gold and two silver medals. She also held nine Canadian Championship titles. After retiring from competition she turned to coaching gymnastics at the college level in Pennsylvania and Florida. She has also written several books on her beloved sport and been coach to the US world gymnastic team. In 1981 she was inducted into the Windsor/Essex County Sports Hall of Fame.  
 
Hockey      back
Eva Catherine Ault-Buel Born October 11, 1891  Aultsville, Stormont County, Ontario. Died 1984 Ottawa, Ontario. Eva and her family relocated to Ottawa when she was young. In 1915 the Alerts Ladies Hockey team was formed and Eve was one of the first on the ice. She played with her younger sister Bessie. The team was mainly made of women from the Ottawa Ladies College and the local Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) Eva became the star of the team and was known as the ‘Queen of the ice’. She usually scored at least one goal every game she played. In 1916 the Alerts were defeated by the Cornwall Victorias placing 2nd in the Canadian Championships for Ladies Hockey. In 1917 the Alerts defeated the Pittsburg Polar Maids from the U.S.A. to become World Champions. In the 1922-23 season they captured the Canadian title. That year the Toronto Star newspaper called Eva ‘a real star’. The Alerts won the 1923 Ontario Championships.  In 1924-1925 Eva served as vice-president of the Ladies Ontario Hockey Association which had been formed on December 16, 1922. The Alert Ladies Hockey team disbanded in 1929 and Eva retired from playing hockey. She became a volunteer at the famous Lady Minto Skating Club that was home to such players as Barbara Ann Scott. Eva married a Ottawa Rough Riders football player, James Buel.
 
Shirley Cameron

Shirley played hockey on outdoor rinks when the girls teams shoved newspapers in their socks as shin pads. It would be several years before girls’ teams would have access after 11:30 p.m. on indoor hockey rinks. She would play on team Canada at the 1st Women’s World Hockey Championships. She would skate for 20 years in competitive hockey. In 1972 she was a founding member of the Edmonton Chimos and with this team she would win 16 National Championships.  One year when she wanted to play in the national championships she could not get time off work so she called in sick. She was sanctioned by her boss when he saw her photo in the newspaper. She retired from competition in 1992 and turned to coaching. The Cameron cup which is the prize for a 10 game series between teams in Alberta is named in her honour. She is considered the 1st superstar of women’s hockey in the modern era. In 2016 she was inducted into the Alberta  Sport Hall of Fame Source: The Hockey Hall of Fame Time capsule Notable Women Hockey players , The Hockey Hall of Fame  Online (Accessed February 2014)
 

Cassie Campbell

Born Richmond Hill, Ontario November 22, 1973. It seems as if Cassie has always loved to play hockey. As a youth she played in Calgary with the Oval X-Team In 1995 she as Captain of the University of Guelph team, The Gryphons, which she led to winning the Ontario University Championships. She earned her honours BA in Sociology in 1997. In 2000 she was named top forward in the Esso National Women’s Championships. In 2005 she was on the team winning the inaugural Western Women’s Hockey League cup. She was on the Olympic teams that won silver in 1998, and gold medals in 2002 and 2006. She is the only hockey captain (male or female) to lead her team to two Olympic Gold medals. She has also played in Seven World Championships and is the longest serving Hockey team captain to date. On October 14, 2006 she became the first woman to provide colour commentary on Hockey Night in Canada. She is the first woman hockey player inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and into the University of Guelph Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. This was the same year she published her first book, H.E.A.R.T. which was written for youth showing what success is. As of 2011 she has been a member of 21 National Women’s team medal games that includes 17 gold Medals! No wonder the City of Brampton proudly named their Community Centre in her honour. In June 2011 she received an honourary degree from the university of Guelph. Cassie is married to Brad Pascal and the couple have one daughter. (c 2011) Sources: Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame: The Portico, University of Guelph Fall 2011.
 

Joan Ann Cooch Born September 6, 1932, Kingston, New York. Died March 23, 2013. She earned her doctorate at Cornell University in New York State, U.S.A. and moved to Canada to teach medicine at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg and later the University of Ottawa. She Married Dr. F. Graham Cooch on September 5, 1958. Somehow it was easy for him to remember both her birthday and wedding anniversary this way. The couple had three children. In 1972 she took on the up and coming sport of Girl’s Hockey. Not every girl who skated wanted to be a figure skater! She gathered together her own daughters and other girls who loved to skate and convinced skeptical parents to sponsor the all girl hockey Team. She recruited her non- hockey husband to become a dedicated coach. Using hand-me down equipment mainly from older brothers the team travelled to Toronto, Montreal and even down to New York State to play games and tournaments. Fundraising was a constant and the girls even played demonstration games with boys Peewee hockey teams. Joan’s efforts and determination on behalf of the girls hockey teams laid the foundation for a permanent legacy for women’s hockey. She remained with the tam through to the early 1980’s. The Nepean Girl’s Hockey Association initiated the Joan Cooch Trophy for the Junior Division Champions of the Association’s International Tournament which has boasted having over 30 teams as participants. Sources: Life Story by Janice E. Mathis (Cooch) Ottawa Citizen May 4, 2013..
 
Lori Dupuis

Born Cornwall, Ontario November 14, 1972. Lori always enjoyed playing hockey and played Minor hockey in Cornwall She attended the University of Toronto and earned an honours B.A. in French and geography. While studying she played hockey for the University of Toronto Blues 1991-1997 and was U of T’s Female Athlete of the Year 1996 and 1997. Considered one of the best women hockey players in the world she joined Team Canada in the mid 1990’s. She has played with the team as it won three world championships in 1997, 1999 and 2000. She played on two Olympic teams for Canada , the sliver medal team in 1998 and the gold medal team of 2000. She runs a hockey school with teammate Jayna Hefford in Brantford, Ontario. She was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame in both Cornwall and Brantford.
 

Gillian Ferrari Born June 23, 1980 Thornhill, Ontario. She has played women’s team hockey since she was on the Team Ontario Under 17. As she aged she gained entry into the provincial and national women’s teams. In 1997 she won a silver medal with Ontario and was named top defenseman at the National Midget Championships. She served as captain in the Canada’s National Women’s team under 22 in 2001. She began playing hockey with the Brampton Thunder of the National Women’s Hockey League in 2004/5.  She has bee on 9 gold medal winning games with the Canada National Women’s Hockey team including the 2006 Olympic Games, the 2004 and 2007 II HF World Women’s Championships and 6 times at the 4Nations/3Nations Cup from 2001through 2009. Canadian international teams won silver in 2008 and 2009 with her defensive plays. During her career she earned the nick name Ferdawg. In 2006 she was elected to the Brampton (Ontario) Sports Hall of Fame. She retired from playing internationally hockey in September 2011 but has not given up the game and intends to enjoy playing. She studied civil engineering as Seneca Collage in and in 2010/11 she played with the McGill University ladies Team. She is looking forward to continuing play after graduation from university. Sources: SR/Olympic sports online (Accessed January 2012)
 
Marion Fraser Born 1877? Died 1922, Ottawa Ontario. Marion attended Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario in 1894-1896. She did not graduate but left a legacy in her chosen sport of ice hockey. She was a pioneer in the competitive sport of women’s hockey playing for the University team who were known as the Love-Me-Littles and later the Morning Glories. March 6, 1896 the Daily British Whig reported that the Morning Glories defeated the Blues and Blacks of the Ladies College 2 to 1 with Marion scoring of  the Queen’s goals. On March 11, 1896 the paper once again reported that Miss M. Fraser scored one goal in a 4-2 loss to the Blues and Blacks. Sadly Marion died from falling out a window she had opened to get some fresh air.
 
Annie Elizabeth 'Bessie' Graham-Jenkinson née Graham. Born May 30, 1905 Arnprior, Ontario.  Died 1989 Calgary, Alberta. Bessie attended Queen’s University where she played goalie with the Women’s hockey team. On February 7, 1927 she surprised the fans by wearing a fencing face mask at the game. Safety first may have been her motto. She was the 1st net minder to don such a safety device. The Queen’s team won the fame over the Toronto Varsity Blues 3-2. The event was unique and was reported by the Kingston Whig-Standard newspaper the following day. Bessie graduated from Queens and in 1928 earned her teaching certificate from the Ontario College of Education. The following year she taught Latin and English at Hamilton Collegiate. In 1929 she married Hugh Jenkinson and retired from teaching. The couple had three children.  Hugh worked for Alcan and the family moved to various locations in British Columbia and Quebec. Bessie never played hockey beyond university and her son stated that she did not even follow the sport as an adult.
 
Gladys Marguerite Hawkins-Pitcher.

née Hawkins. Born 1916 Kitchener, Ontario. Died March 18, 2011 Kitchener, Ontario.  In the 1930’s Gladys was a member of the Kitchener Wentworth Women’s Hockey Club. From 1935 through 1940, when the team folded with the war looming, she played with the prestigious Preston Rivulettes Women’s Hockey Club. This club would play some 350 games winning all but one game. In 1937 she married Donald Pitcher (1913-1994) whom she met at a hockey arena. The couple had three children. Gladys worked alongside of her husband at various businesses for which she earned the Paul Harris Award from the Preston-Hespler Rotary Club. In 1998 she was inducted into Cambridge Sports Hall of Fame along with her team. In 2015 Tracey Power penned the play Glory depicting the Rivulettes team in action In December 2017 the Government of Canada placed an historic plaques in honour of the accomplishments of the Rivulettes Preston’s main arena. The team’s story is told by Carly Adams in Queens of the ice lanes: the Preston Rivulettes and women’s hockey in Canada 1931-1940.
 

Jayna Hefford Born May 14, 1977 Trenton, Ontario. Jayna began playing hockey when she was six in Kingston, Ontario where she was raised. In 1995 Jayna was captain of the Gold Medal team at the Canada Winter Games and a Gold Medalist at the Under 18 Nationals with her Team Ontario. In 1996-1997 Jayna played hockey with the Brampton Thunder Women's Team and the Mississauga Chiefs of the National Women's Hockey League (NWHL). That year she was the Ontario Intercollegiate Athletic Association Rookie of the Year. In 1998 she was named Kingston, Ontario's Amateur Athlete of the Year when she played minor hockey in the city. When she attended the University of Toronto and played for the Blues hockey team she was the top scorer. From 1997 though 2001 Jayna was a member of the Canadian Women's Hockey Team  with the team winning four Gold Medals at the World Championships. In 1999 and 2000 she was top scorer at the World Championships.  Jayna was a member of Team Canada when the Canadian Women's Hockey team  won a Silver Medal in the Winter Olympic Games, Nagano, Japan and the Gold Medal at the Winter Olympic Games, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A. in 2002 and that same year she was inducted into the Brampton Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. In 2003 she was Top Forward at the Esso Women's National Championships a feat she repeated in 2005 and 2008.  Jayna is a National spokesperson for the Canadian Hockey Association's Initiation Program. She runs a hockey School with one of her former teammates. In 2008-2009 Jayna earned the he Angela James Bowl which was introduced in 2007-08 to recognize the top points scorer in the newly formed CWHL. In 2009 she established a charity golf tournament, the Jayna Hefford Links 4 Life Golf Classic, raising money for the cancer and palliative care undertaken at Kingston's university hospitals. Jayna and her partner Kathleen Kauth have a daughter and a son. In 2016 the CWHL introduced the Jayna Hefford Trophy awarded to the most outstanding player in the regular season as judged by the players themselves. (2018)
 
Norma Hiipel-Jacques

née Hipel. Born 1920. Norma enjoyed sports growing up. She was a good swimmer and a good ballplayer but it was her love of ice hockey which would capture her interest the most. In 1935 she joined at 16 years old, the Preston Rivulettes Women’s Hockey team. The prestigious team would play 350 games losing only two games and winning six Dominion Championships. The team folded in 1940 with World War ll on people’s minds. Norma  married and had 7 children. In 1998 the entire Rivulettes team was inducted into the Cambridge Sports Hall of Fame at the inaugural ceremony. In 2015 Tracey Power penned the play Glory depicting the Rivulettes team in action. In December 2017 the Government of Canada placed an historic plaques in honour of the accomplishments of the Rivulettes Preston’s main arena. She retired to British Columbia where she lives near one of her daughters in a nursing home. The team’s story is told by Carly Adams in Queens of the ice lanes: the Preston Rivulettes and women’s hockey in Canada 1931-1940.
 

Angela James

Born December 22, 1964, Toronto, Ontario. Known as ‘AJ’ she started playing hockey in the minor hockey system with the boys. AJ dealt with the boys on the teams by fiving back whatever the boys gave. The real challenge in the early days of playing were the parents who just did not want girls playing on the teams or against their son. Leaving the boys behind at 10 she joined Annunciation, a Catholic organization that included a girls’ house league hockey program. From the house league she moved to ladies senior C league and then Ladies AA, the top of women’s hockey in the Toronto area in the late 1970’s. She played for numerous teams moving when a team closed or when her friends changed teams. In the 1980’s it was community and college hockey while she was a student at Seneca College in North York, Ontario. From 1983-1985 she was also an all-star softball player. Between accolades in both softball and hockey she was Seneca College Athlete of the year in 1984-5. As a teen she had also be an official and refereed some university team games. From 1989-1996 she was the highest scorer in the Central Ontario Hockey League and won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) award 6 times. In 1992 she earned a coaching certification and coached competitive atom (9/10 years of age) girls’ team, the Scarborough Sharks. She owns the Broadway Adult Hockey School and runs a hockey camp for young girls. She is a member of the Canadian women’s national Hockey team since their 1st World Championship in 1990 and has played on the 1992, 1994, World Cup Teams. (2016)
 

Charline Labont1é Born October 15, 1982, Broisbriand, Quebec. She is only the 2nd hockey player (after Manon Rhéaume) to play Major Junior Hockey in Canada. She earned her Bachelor in Education and her Masters in Psychology at McGill University. In 1999 she was part of the hockey team for Quebec, winning silver medals at the Canada Winter Games. She has been a member of Women’s World Championship teams winning gold or silver medals from 2004 through 2014. She has also been on three Gold Medal  Olympic women’s hockey teams in 2002, 2006, and 2014. In 2006 she was the top goaltender in the Esso Women’s National Hockey Championships (pool A) She has played for the Montreal Axion and Laval LeMistral teams of the National Women’s Hockey League and the Montreal Stars of the Canadian Women’s Hockey League. Source: Charlinelabonte.ca (Accessed February 2014
 
Albertine Lapensée     Born August 10, 1898 Cornwall, Ontario. Growing up Albertine learned to play hockey with her brothers and their friends on the local ponds and creeks. When the Cornwall Nationals, later the Victorias were formed around the beginning of World War l Albertine joined. She would earn the name ‘Miracle Maid’ or in French ‘L’etoile des etoiles’. And become one of Canada’s 1st female hockey superstars. She was the team’s top scorer with her best record being 15 goals in a 21-0 game. In December 1915 a ladies hockey league was established in Montreal, The Eastern Ladies Hockey League (ELHL) by Len Porteoies. He formed a ladies hockey team to sell tickets for the Jubilee Arena to replace the men’s teams who’s players were now serving in World War l. According to newspaper accounts the Victorias in 1916-1917 played 46 winning games and outscoring opponents such as the Ottawa Alerts by almost 200 goals. Albertine evidently began to demand some of the revenue garnered from the games in which she played. She was highly criticized for her demands. In 1918 she retired from hockey and seems to have disappeared in a cloud of mystery.  It was reported that opponents felt she was a man because she plays so much better than other players in the ladies league. Did she have sex change and return to live as a man in Cornwall? Reports in 1940 have her married to a Mr. Albert Schmidt of New York and had the couple living in Cornwall.
 
Hilda Ranscombe Born September 11, 1913, Doon, Ontario (part of modern Kitchener-Waterloo) Died August 25, 1999. She and her sister loved to participate in sports. They played softball, tennis and in winter, hockey. Hilda played for the Preston Rivulettes women hockey team. The team played on the frozen grand river. She and her sister Nellie where among the 1st members of the team and Hilda was the team captain.  The team had a record of 350 to 2 recorded games. They won 6 Dominion championships and 10 Ontario and Quebec titles. In the 1930’s they were described as the greatest female hockey players in the world. As an adult she sold real estate for a career. In 1996 she was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. Before her death she donated all of her equipment to the Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1997 she was inducted into the Cambridge Hall of Fame, Ontario. In May 1998 she was inducted into the World’s Women’s Hockey Hall of Fame in the pioneer player category as well as the Cambridge Sports Hall of Fame, Cambridge, Ontario. In 1999 she was named female athlete of the 20th Century by the Cambridge Hall of Fame. In 2015 Tracey Power penned the play Glory depicting the Rivulettes team in action December 2017 the Government of Canada placed an historic plaques in honour of the accomplishments of the Rivulettes Preston’s main arena. The team’s story is told by Carly Adams in Queens of the ice lanes: the Preston Rivulettes and women’s hockey in Canada 1931-1940.
 
Manon Rhéaume.  Born February 24, 1972 Lac Beauport, Quebec.  The daughter of a hockey coach, she began to play at the age of 5 years. She loved hockey and played well. She was the 1st girl to play in the Annual Quebec Peewee Hockey Tournament. In 1991-1992 she was the 1st woman to play in a men's Major Junior hockey game.  She went on to become the 1st woman to play professionally. She was goalie with the Tampa Bay Lightening of the National Hockey League playing in preseason exhibition games in 1992-1993. She also played on the Canadian Women's National Ice Hockey League, with the team winning gold medals in the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) Women's World Championship in 1992 and 1994 followed with a silver medal in the 1998 Nagano, Japan Winter Olympic Games. If you want the whole story read Manon: Alone in Front of the Net written in 1997, the year she initially retired from professional hockey. In June 1998 she married Gerry St Cyr but the marriage ended in divorce. The couple has two sons. In 2000 she served as marketing director for Mission Hockey, Irvine, California, U.S.A. where she developed and promoted girls' hockey equipment. In 2008 she formed the Manon Rhéaume Foundation to provide scholarships for young women . In 2008 and 2009 she was working in her sport in  Michigan, and Minnesota, U.S.A. She is still active in her sport today teaching young girls how to play the sport she loves. Her web site is located at;  http://manonrheaume.com
 
France St Louis. Born October 17, 1958. In the 1980s, France  competed for the Ferland Quatre Glaces ice hockey team at 1st based out of Brossard, and then Repentigny, in the League Régionale du Hockey au Féminin in the province of Québec, France also plays Canada's oldest National Sport, Lacrosse. She was a member of the Canadian Lacrosse women's team from 1985through 189 playing in the 1986 and 1989 World Championships. Her team won gold in the 1989 Canadian Championships. She was the Quebec Lacrosse Athelete of the Decade in 1990. A member of the Canadian Women’s Hockey team from 1990 to 1999, she was a member of the silver medal team at the 1998 Olympic games in Nagano, Japan. Team Canada went on to win gold at the IIHF Women's world Championships, gold in the 1996 Three-Nation Cup and gold again at the 1996 Pacific Rim. She earned The Quebec Athelete Award of Excellence in Women's Hockey 1986 and again in 1991.  France was an assistant coach for Team Quebec at the 1991 Canada Winter Games. In 1998 she was named Most Valuable Player at the Esso Nationals where Team Quebec placed third to win the Maureen McTeer Trophy. In 1988, 1990, 1991, 1997 and 1998 she was named the Most Valuable Player on her team at the Canadian Championships. France earned her BA in Physical Education  In 2003 she was inducted into the Panthéon des sports du Québec Sports Hall of Fame  In 2010 she was a consultant for the Montreal Carabins women's ice hockey program. In 2011 she travelled to Bratislava, Slovakia to participate in the IIHF High Performance Women's Camp. In 2014 she received the Order of Hockey in Canada from Hockey Canada. (2018)
 
Tammy Lee "Barbie" Shewchuk-Dryden Born December 31, 1977, St-Laurent,  Quebec. In 1991 and 1995 she played on team Quebec in hockey at the Canada Winter Games.  In 1994, with now girls ice hockey teams around she played as the only girl on the Lac-St.- Louis Lions Ice hockey team. By the end of the 1990’s she was attending Harvard University at Cambridge, Massachusetts and was a member of the Crimson University hockey team. In 1998-1999 she was named First –Team All American leading Harvard to College Hockey Championships. Her skills allowed her to earn Harvard’s John Dooley Award for combining sportsmanship and devotion to hockey. By 2000 and 2001 she was a member of the Canadian gold medal team at the Women’s World Hockey Championships. On February 21 2002 she was a team member when Canadian women won Olympic gold for women’s hockey. In 2004 she was coaching at Wesleyan University in Connecticut and was Acting Dean of Admissions at Lawrenceville School, New Jersey, U.S. A.
 
Sami Jo Small Born March 25, 1976 Winnipeg, Manitoba. Sami Jo began playing hockey in St. Vital, Manitoba in Midget AAA and Junior B hockey. She was Team Captain at the Pan American Juniors. While attending Stanford University, Stanford, California, U.S.A. She was an active member of the Track team from 1994 through 1998 and she played on the men's hockey team until 1999. In 1996-1997 she was named Pac-10 Player of the year. She graduated from Stanford University in Mechanical Engineering. In 1999, 2000 and 2001 Sami Jo was a member of Team Canada when they won the World Championships and in 1999 and again in 2000 she earened the Directorate Award as Best Goalie at the World Championships. In 1999 and 2001 she made the All-Stars team at he Women's World Hockey Championships. She played with the the Brampton, Ontario Thunder team from 1999-2000.  In the 2002 Olympic Games in Salt Lake City Sami Jo was a member of the Olympic Gold Medal Canadian Women's Hockey Team. In 2006 she became Athelete Ambassador for the Right to Play, a global organization that attempts to teach children in need with educational games. Sami Jo is married to Billy Bridges a champion sledge hockey player. In 2008 -2010 Sami Jo was on the Second All-Star Team of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. Winnipeg boasts of a Sami Jo Hockey Facility at the Norberry-Glenlee Community Centre. (2018)
 
Isabel Constance Mary Stanley

 (Lady Stanley)

Born September 2, 1875. Died December 30 1963. The daughter of Lord Stanley, Governor General to Canada, the gentleman of the Stanley Cup fame. The family saw a game of ice hockey in Quebec and Isobel became enthusiastic about the sport. She helped popularize hockey in Canada. She is one of the first women to be photographed with a hockey stick and puck in the 1890’s. The first recorded women’s hockey game was on March 8, 1899,. The game was reported in the Ottawa Evening Journal as being between the Government House team and the Rideau Ladies team. The women found their longer skirts handy in stopping the puck! In 1898 Isobel married Sir John Francis Gathome-Hardy and the couple had on daughter, Elizabeth (1904-1958) In Hockey the Isobel Gathome-Hardy Award is presented to an active player whose values, leadership and personal traits represent the best of the female athletes. At one time Isobel held the office of Woman of the Bedchamber to Her Majesty Queen Mary. She was invested as Dame Commander, Royal Victorian Order (D.C.V.O.). Sources: http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/hockey/kids  … accessed June 2011; The peerage.com http://the peerage.com/p1394. Accessed June 2011; Women in Ottawa: Mentors and milestones http://womeninottawa.blogspot.com accessed June 2011.
 

Vicky Sunohara Born May 18, 1970 Scarborough, Ontario. While Vicky enjoyed playing touch football and Ball hockey she shines best in women's ice hockey. She played in five World Championships winning teams from 1990 through 2001. She was named to the All-American All-Star Team in 1989-1990 while she attended Northeastern University, Boston, Massacheutts, U.S.A. In 1990 to 1992 she played with the Scarborough Firefighters  and the University of Toronto Blues while she attended the University of Toronto. Playing with the U of T Blues the team won the Ontario University Championships in 1991 and 1992.  From 1994 to 1996 she played with The Toronto Red Wings. Playing with the North York Astros  the team won a Silver medal at the Esso Women's National Championships. Playing with the Beatrice Astros at the 1999 Esso Women's National Championships the team won a Bronze medal. She is the all-time National Women's Team leader with six game-winning goals scored at the World Championships. A member of Team Canada she was on the 1998 Olympic team in Nagano, Japan when the team won Silver. In 2002 in Salt Lake City Olympic Games she was assistant captain when the team won Gold. She is the mother of twin boys. She is a member of the faculty of the University of Toronto and conducts summer hockey camps.
 
Haley Wickenheiser. Born Shaunavon, Saskatchewan December 8,1978. Team sports are her favourite. She played in competition in the World Junior Softball Championships in 1995. Then it was hockey. She played with a gold medal team at the 1997-99 World hockey Championships and the silver medal team at the 1998 Nagano Olympics. She was invited to play with the Philadelphia Flyers training camp which she found a great opportunity to learn at the NHL level. She has done studies in science at the University of Calgary. She was the 1st woman to play full-time professional hockey in a position other than goalie.  and is currently the first woman to have accepted a contract to play hockey on a men's team. She was a member of the Canada women's national ice hockey tem for 23 years from 1994 until retirement in January 2017. She represented Canada at the Winter Olympics five times capturing four gold medals and one silver medal. She also represented Canada in softball at the 2000 summer Olympics. She is considered the greatest female ice hockey player in the world. On February 20, 2014 she was elected to the International Olympic Committee's Athletes' Commission. in 2011 her hometown recreational complex in Shaunovon was named in her honour the Crescent Point Wickenheiser Centre. On June 30, 2011 she was named an Officer of the Order of Canada. She authored the book Gold Medal Diary: Inside the World's Greatest Sports Event. In 2013 she earned a degree in kinesiology. Haley has one adopted son.
 
Judo    back
Michelle Buckingham Born Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. September 1, 1968. She loves her sport of Judo. She has been Canadian Champion 7 times and competed with team Canada in three Olympics. The fact that Olympic medals have eluded her have not dampened her competitive spirit. She has been in the tope medals , including gold, in both the Pan American Games and the Pan American Championships since 1997. She has been first in the US Open competition in 2001 and 2002. She shares her love, dedication and knowledge of her sport with up and coming competitors in and elementary after school Programme when she is at home.
 
Frances 'Fran' McCrodden Born Glasgow, Scotland. In 1954 Fran married her childhood sweetheart in July 1954 and the couple emigrated to Canada to raise their two children. In 1972 Fran registered her son in Judo and the club need volunteers. Her daughter gave up hockey to participate in Judo and Fran believed in becoming involved. She began volunteering by organizing transportation to tournaments and fundraising for the club in which her children were registered. In 1980  she was elected as the 1st woman Director of the tora Martial Arts Club. From 1979 through 2000 she was director of the Tora Invitational Tournament. In 1985 the City of Brampton recognized Fran with an Outstanding Service to the Community Award. In 1992 she was volunteering for Judo at the Pan American games and the following year she was the coordinator for the Sports Injury Clinic for Judo Ontario. 1993 also saw Fran being heavily involved in the World Championship Tournament Organizing Committee. She was the Regional Secretary and Treasurer for the Central West Judo Region from 1990 until 1996 when she was elected as councilor to Judo Ontaio. She became Ontario Juso Team Manager for the Ontario Winter James, The Canada Winter Games and the Commonwealth Games from 1991 though 1998. She volunteered more hours than any other Judo Ontario position and has been given the nickname 'Judomom'. and "mother of Ontario Judo. In 2000 Fran was inducted into the Brampton Sport Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Kayak and canoe       back
Caroline Brunet. Born March 20,1969 Quebec City, Quebec. In March 1998, Caroline became the recipient of the Velma Springstead Award to become Canada's Outstanding Female Athlete of the Year. Her recognition began in 1995 when she won a gold and 2 silver medals at the World Championships. In Atlanta's Olympic Games in 1997 she claimed the silver medal. She swept the World Sprint Canoe Championships in 1997 when she won three gold medals which represented "a best ever" Canadian Kayak team performance.  She gold medal also represented a first for a Canadian woman in a singles event. She also won a Bronze medal in the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece before taking her retirement. In 2009 she was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. 
 
Marjorie Homer-Dixon Born August 10, 1945, Indochina. At the 1967 Winnipeg Pan-Am Games she won a bronze medal in the kayak doubles. In 1968 she won the silver at the North American Championships and participated in the Olympic Games in Mexico. She was a member of the 1st Canadian K4 women team to win North American gold in 1969. She retired from competition after 1972 and became a coach. She attended McMaster University to earn her BA in 1973. In 1976 she worked at the Olympic Games, Montreal as a TV commentator.
 
Lucy Slade Born May 16, 1972. Died January 14, 2011, Whistler, British Columbia. Growing up in Ottawa, Lucy spent many summers at the Rideau Canoe Club doing what she loved most, sprint racing canoes and kayaks. She would go on to win four gold, three silver and eight bronze medals at Canadian championships from 1987 through 1996. She also held four gold medals at the 1989 Canada Summer Games in Saskatoon. . She would wear the championship purple jersey of the RCC for ten years.  In 1991 she was a member of the four – woman kayak silver medal team at the American Games in Cuba. She retired from the sport in 1996 and kept in shape by biking, skiing  running. She took a coaching position with the Cascade Canoe Club moving to Chelsea Quebec. In the late 1990’s she completed university and she and her partner Andy Ball became parents to twins. Source: Paddler remembered for her zest for life by Carole Hardy-Kavanaugh and Mike Scott Globe and Mail February 26, 2012. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.
 
Motorcycle Racing
Kathleen Coburn                  She attended a motorcycle race at Mosport track, outside of Toronto, in 1985  and became instantly hooked. She did not even ride. She attended Norm Sheppard’s       Race   School and bought herself a Yamaha RD350LC. At school she was called “Crashleen” but she was not detoured. With the support and encouragement of her father she became the 1st woman to earn points in the Camel Pro series for the American Motorcycle Association. She did not want to be god for a woman she wanted to be the best in the field. In Brainerd, Minnisota, U.S.A. she placed second. In 1987 she became the 1st woman to qualify for the Datona (Florida, U.S.A.) 200! Yamaha was impressed enough to send her to Japan for competitions. In 1990 financial restraints of competition caused her to give up racing. She married Jonathan Head and the couple settled to a landscaping business in Uxbridge, Ontario. They have two daughters who are both no. 1 plates in cross-country races. Source: the Canadian Motorcycle Hall of Fame Online. Accessed August 2013.
 
Mountain Biking    back
Alison Sydor Born Edmonton, Alberta. 1966. A graduate of the University of Victoria, she has also found time for her love of sport, especially riding her mountain bike. She is considered one of Canada's most accomplished women mountain biker and a tough competitive athlete. She has dominated her sport both at the national and international level with gold medals in World championships in 1994, 1995 and 2002. She places second at the world level championships in 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2003. In 1996 she won silver at the Olympics as was the Canadian Press Female Athlete of the Year and World Cyclist of the year from the Velo News. In 1998 she ran the last part of a race with her broken bicycle on her back to cross the finish line! Today she works for her sport through a kids ride program in North Vancouver.
 
Mountaineering      back
Phyllis Munday. (née Jarnes) Born 1894. Died 1990. This woman has a mountain named for herself and her husband Don. Mount Munday is the highest peak in the Waddington Range of the Canadian Rockies. A competent climber she and Annette Buck in 1924 became the first women to reach the summit of Mount Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. While she would enjoy climbing more than 100 peaks in the Rockies she was more than a mountaineer. She was a scientist, cartographer, naturalist, humanitarian and adventurer. In 1973 she received the Order of Canada for her pioneering efforts in these fields and for her dedicated service to the Girl Guides, St. Johns Ambulance and the Alpine Club of Canada. In 1992, Canada Post issued a stamp with Phyllis Munday on it as part of its Legendary Canadians series.
 
Urszula Tokarska

Born Poland 1963. She emigrated to Canada in 1988 and studied environmental design at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto, Ontario. In 1998 she visited the Mount Everest bas camp in Nepal where she was smitten with mountain climbing. In 2001 she joined an expedition up Mount Aconcagra, the highest peak in South America. Inspired by fellow climber, Peggy Foster, who was attempting to be the first Canadian woman to climb to the top of the seven tallest summits in the world she continued her climbing. In 2002 she climbed the highest peaks offered in Europe and Africa. She also claimed Mount Elbrus in Russia and Mount Kilimanjaro in Kenya. In 2004 it was Mount McKinley in North America and Australia’s mount Kosciuszko and even Vinson Massif in Antarctica that she conquered. She was turned by from the summit of Everest by storms. In June 2005 she and Peggy Foster made another attempt at Everest with Urszula the one to claim the top of the mountain. Urszula had become the first Canadian Woman to climb all seven of the world’s tallest peaks. Sources: Herstory: the Canadian Women’s Calendar 2007 Coteau Books, 2006 page 80: www.everstnews.com /everst2005/ … accessed June 2011.
 

Henrietta "Hettie"  Loetitia Tuzo Wilson  Loetitia Tuzo Wilson. (née Tuzo) Born Victoria, British Columbia May 6, 1873. Died January 11, 1955.Ottawa, Ontario   A founding member of the Alpine Club of Canada she had a real passion for climbing. In 1906 she was the 1st  woman to ascend Peak seven of the Valley of the Ten Peaks near Moraine Lake and bordering the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta.  In 1907 Peak Seven was renamed Mount Tuzo in her honour. She stopped climbing in 1907 when she was 34 years old. She moved to Ottawa, Ontario  with her husband, John Amistead Wilson, a well established Scottish engineer, to raise their family. In 1928 she was elected president of the National Council of Women, still climbing the mountains set up in front of women by society. She was also an active volunteer with the Red Cross The Ottawa Women's Canadian Club. and a proponent of the League of Nations. She also found time to write for the Canadian Geographical Journal. She was presented with the King's Jubilee Medal in 1935 and in 1937 the King's Coronation Medal. John Tuzo Wilson, her son became a well known Canadian geologist in the area of continental drift and plat tectonics. Sources: "Mrs. Wilson Familiar Figure" by Madge Macbeth, Ottawa Citizen August 17, 1957. ; Off the Beaten Track; women adventurers and mountaineers in western Canada by Cyndi Smith. Coyote Books, 1998.
 
Sharon Adele Wood. Born Halifax, Nova Scotia May 18, 1957. One might say mountaineering is in her blood. In the spring of 1986 she became the first woman from the Western hemisphere to stand on top of the world on Mt. Everest. She was 17 years old!!! On a smaller scale she was part of an all woman team to navigate to the top of Mt. Logan. She enjoys teacher her sport to others when she is not working as a helicopter ski guide.
 
Orienteering     back
Susan Jane Budge Born June 2, 1961, Montreal, Quebec. In 1972 Susan won the Canadian under 14 championship in Orienteering. In 1973-1974 won Canadian Junior title and the following year, 975, she was runner up to Canadian Senior Ladies title. That same year she the Quebec Senior Ladies title and North American Junior Ladies Orienteering title, and the Denmark International 13-14 year olds title. In 1976 runner up at North America Open championship. She also enjoys being an alpine ski racer. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977. (Posted Feb 2016)  
 
Rhythmic Gymnastics    back
Lori Fung Born Vancouver, British Columbia February 21, 1963. She has a passion for her Rhythmic Gymnastics. She started at the British Columbia Rythmicka Club. She was an able student and a good listener. These talents paid off when in 1983 she became Canadian Champion and later that same year the Four Continents Gold medalist . She would during her competitive career be Grand Champion of Canada seven times. To the media she was a relative unknown contender, yet she won gold at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics when the sport was inaugurated into the Olympic Games. Retired from competition, she remains a valued coach in her sport. She also works for Canadian charities in such positions as Chairperson of the Canadian Cancer Society. She is a recipient of the Order of Canada and a member of Canada's Sport Hall of Fame.
 
Ringette     back
Agnes Jacks Died April 1, 2005. In 1963 her husband introduced the sport of Ringette in a school in North Bay, Ontario. After his death in 1975, Agnes poured her heart an soul into the sport. She became a true 'mother of the sport'. She promoted the sport, often traveling across the country to tournaments. She took great pride in the sport and the participants as she handed out the top medals. She also became an overseas ambassador for the sport. She was recognized with the Order of Canada and the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal for her contributions to women's sport.
 
Rowing     back
Jennifer Kristen Barnes. Born March 26, 1968 London, United Kingdom. Kristen took up rowing while she was still in high school. In 1988 she participated in her 1st Olympic Games in the coxless pair rowing with Sarah Ann Ogilvie and the couple took 7th place. In 1987 she would be part of the Canadian World Team in coxless four rowing to win a gold medal. The 1991 World Rowing Championships While attending the University of Victoria in British Columbia she was three times the university's athlete of the year in 1989 through 1991. She took time off from her university studies in 1992 for her sport and graduated in 1993. In the 1992 Barcelona, Spain Olympic Games she helped her team win Gold in the coxless four and the Coxed eight events. In 1994 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sport Hall of Fame, the Greater Victoria Sport Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame. She continued in school earning her PhD in sport psychology from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. In 2001 she received the University of Victoria's Distinguished Alumni Award. She works as Director of Performance Services with the Canadian Sport Institute. (2018)
 
Beverly 'Bev' Cameron Born Jun 17, 1953, Ottawa, Ontario. 1975 won Canadian championship single sculls, Canadian Henley single sculls and with her sister Trice Cameron she won the double sculls. She earned a place on the Canadian team for the 1976 Olympic Games in Canada but did not place on the podium. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977. (Posted Feb 2016)
 
Megan Delehanty Born 1968 Edmonton, Alberta. While attending the University of Alberta Megan participated in track and field and weight lifting before being approached to join the rowing team. She continued in the spirt at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. In 1990 she was on the Canadian National Rowing team winning in the under 23 Women's coxed eight at the United States Rowing Championship. In 1991 she was a team member at the World Championship. In the 1992 Barcelona, Spain Olympic Games she was on the Canadian women's coxed eight team winning the gold medal. After her win at the Olympic Games she retired from competition to continue her studies at university earning a PhD in Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. In 2005 she was named to the University of Alberta's Sports Wall of Fame and in 2007 she was inducted into the Alberta Sport Hall of Fame. Megan is an assistant professor with the Department of Philosophy at the University of Calgary. She has authored numerous articled for learned journals and has published a book. (2018)
 
Kathleen Heddle Born November 27, 1965, Trail, British Columbia. Kathleen grew up in Vancouver and while attending the University of British Columbia she took and interest in volleyball but was disappointed when she was told she was not varsity volleyball material. Disappointment soon lifted as she was ’discovered’ by the coach of the university rowing team. She won her 1st gold in 1987 at the Pan American Games.  In the 1990’s she graduated with a BA in Psychology but remained active in the sport of rowing. In 1990 she was partnered with Marnie McBean and the two women would partner into the Canadian sport history. In 1991 she was a member of the eights rowing team and pairs winning the Canada’s 1st world championships. This title was won again in 1994 and 1995.  In 1992 Olympics the two women won a Gold medal in Coxless pairs and a second gold medal in the rowing women’s eight team. Returning to participate in the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 they again too podium gold for double sculls women’s event and a bronze medal in the Quadruple Sculls for women. !997 Kathleen was the British Columbia Athlete of the year and was inducted into the Order of British Columbia and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She and McBean were presented with the Thomas Keller Medal by FISA, the International Rowing Federation. In 2002 she was inducted into the University of British Columbia Sports Hall of fame and the following year the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Sandra Kirby Born September 6, 1949 Calgary, Alberta. In 1971 she earned her Bachelor of Arts in physical education from the University of British Columbia and went on the train to be a teacher the following year. In 1976 she became a member of the woman's rowing team for Canada. Back at University she earned her Master's Degree and by 1986 she had completed her studies for her doctorate at the University of Calgary. In 1989 she was teaching at the Department of Sociology at the University of Winnipeg becoming a senior administrator retiring only in 2014. While teaching she co-authored 13 books. By 1996 she had researched and published the 1st quantitative survey od sexual harassment and sexual abuse among high Performance athletes. She also became a member of the WomenSport International Task Force on Sexual harassment. She worked with the International Olympic Committee and with UNICEF and was part of the founding board for Safe Sport International . In 2018 she was inducted into the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame.
 
Silken Laumann. Born November 14, 1954. At the age of 19 she had won a bonze medal in the double rowing event at the Los Angeles Olympics. She would be in the hearts of  many Canadians,  when she suffered a severe leg injury in a rowing accident while practicing for the 1992 Olympics.  With little time remaining until her event, she trained with a special brace on her leg and, with the perseverance of a real winner,  she went on to win the bronze medal in singles rowing in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics! She was Canada's Female athlete of the year in 1991 and 1992 and she was also declared Canada's Outstanding Athlete in 1991. She retired shortly after winning a silver medal in the 1996 Olympics.  She works as a promotional speaker to help people overcome obstacles in their lives. She is also a devoted mother. 
 
Theresa Anne Luke.  Born February 20, 1967. She has completed her studies at the University of Victoria where she holds a B.Sc. She is a full-time coach and athlete who is looking into a possible sports-related career. As a member of the Canadian Olympic Rowing Team she won a silver medal in the 1996 Atlantic City Olympic Games. 
 
Marnie McBean Born January 28, 1950 Vancouver, British Columbia. Marnie was partnered with Kathleen Heddle by their rowing coach in 1991, a partnership that would establish Canadian sport history. In 1991 she was a member of the eights rowing team and pairs winning the Canada’s 1st world championships. This title was won again in 1994 and 1995.  In 1992 Olympics the two women won a Gold medal in Coxless pairs and a second gold medal in the rowing women’s eight team. Returning to participate in the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 they again too podium gold for double sculls women’s event and a bronze medal in the Quadruple Sculls for women. Marnie was forced to withdraw for the 2000 Sydney Olympics with back problems which would lead to surgery. All in all Marnie would attend 9 Olympic Games as an athlete, member of the media and as mentor. In 1997 she was inducted , along with Kathleen Heddle into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. That same year she was the winner of the Governor General’s Meritorious Service Medal and later the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal. She has also accumulated three honourary doctorates. About a decade after her Olympic victories Marnie realized that she was gay. In 2010 she met her partner Deanah Shelly and the couple were married in 2014.In 2013 Marnie was inducted into the Order of Canada.  In 2015 she was presented with the Bonham Centre Award from the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto for her contributions to the advancement and education issues around sexual identification. She has also written her f1st book, an E-book The Power of More: how small steps can help you achieve big goals. Source: Lauren Pelley, Marriage, Medals and Mentorship. November 10, 2014. ; Marnie McBean, OC Webpage (Accessed May 2015)  
 
Jessica Monroe-Gonin née Monroe. Born May 31, 1966 Palo Alto, California, U.S.A. Jessica attended the University of Victoria in British Columbia and settled in that city. She took up rowing at U of Vic an in 1989 she became a member of the Canadian National rowing team. In 1991 as part of the Canadian contingent at the World Championships she won a gold medal in the coxless four and a second gold medal in the coxed eight rowing events. In 1992 at the Barcelona, Spain, Olympic Games she was part of the Coxless four gold medal team and the coxed eight Gold rowing teams. In 1994 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sport Hall of Fame.  When she participated in the Olympic Games in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. she won a silver medal in the coxed eight rowing event and followed up the next year at the World Championships with another silver Medal for coxed eight event. A physiotherapist at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria, Jessica is the mother of two children. In 2009 she was inducted into the Greater Victoria Sport Hall of Fame and in 2013 she became a member of the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Anna Van Der Kamp. Born June 19, Abbotsford, British Columbia.  This young athlete competed for Canada in the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games in rowing where she earned a silver medal. She gained prominence in her sport in 1993 when she was Female Crew of the Year. She works for the Privy Council Office in Ottawa. She is a member of Clean Air Champions (CAC) a national charity committed to educating Canadians on the importance of air quality and its connctions to health. The CAC ambassadors are Olympic, Paralympic and National Team athletes from across Canada. (2018)
 
Emma Robinson. Born November 26, 1971 Montreal, Quebec. This athlete is a member of the Canadian Olympic Rowing team. In the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, she won a silver medal. She had worked her way to the Olympics with participation and recognition in international regattas, U.S. Championships, World University Games and World Championships. While participating in her beloved sport she also was a Canada Scholar 1990-1994 and the winner of the Petro Canada Olympic Torch Scholarship 1995. She won a bronze medal in the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia. (2017)

 
Brenda Taylor Born October 28, 1962 Nanaimo, British Columbia. Brenda joined the Canadian National Rowing Team in 1984. In the 1986 Commonwealth Games she and her team in the coxed eight event took the bronze medal. In 1990 and again in 1991 at the World Championships her team won gold  in the four event. In 1992 at the Olympic Games, Barcelona, Spain she helped her teams win gold medals in the coxless four and coxed eight events. A day beofore the Olympic competition, Jennifer Walinga was forced to withdraw due to an injury. Brenda Taylor donated her medal to Jennifer Walinga to recognize that she was an essential part of the success of the coxless four team.  Retiring from competition after these Olympic Games Brenda was inducted into the Canadian Rowing Hall of Fame. In 1994 she became a member of the Greater Victoria Sports Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Lesley Allison Thomson-Willie Born September 20, 1959 Toronto, Ontario. Lesley attended the University of Western Ontario. In 1983 she was interested in gymnastics but the next year she competed in the Los Angeles Olympic Games with the women's coxed four rowing team winning a silver medal. Between 1984 and 2016 she had competed in eight Olympic Games. In 1991 she was a member of the gold medal coxed eight at the World Championships. Returning to the Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain in 1992 she was a member of the Canadian coxed eight rowers winning a gold medal. In 1994 she became a member of the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame but she was not yet finished with competition. In the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, U.S.A. as a member of the Canadian coxed eight team she earned a silver medal. In 2000 at the Sydney, Australia Games she and the coxed eight team won a bronze medal. She thought she might retire in 200 and that year she married Dr  Paul Willie a professor at Niagara College. She did not attend the 2004 Olympic Games  but by 2008 she was once again on the Canadian Team at the Beijing, China Olympic Games where the team placed fourth. In London England in 2012 at the Olympic Games she and the coxed eight team won a sliver medal making her the 1st Canadian to win medals at five different Olympic Games. In 2016 at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro the team came in fifth. When she is not training she is a teacher-librarian at secondary school. (2018)
 
Kay Worthington Born December 21, 1959 Toronto, Ontario. While studying at the University of Toronto Kay joined the rowing team in 1979. In the early 1980's she became a member of the Canadian National Rowing team. In 1981, 1983 world Championship and at the 1984 Olympic Games the team had to be satisfied with fourth place finishes. In 1985 she switched to the quadruple sculls at the Worlds and placed in seventh place. In 1987 she again placed forth thi time in the single sculls event at the world Championships. In the 1988 Olympic Games she and Silken Laumann finished 1st in the double sculls B final but landed seventh overall. Kay decided to retire but kept up her training and returned to competition to qualify for the 1992 Olympic Games.  Kay won two gold medals for Coxed eight and coxless four rowing at the 1992 Barcelona, Spain Olympic Games. Kay retired permanently after the Games. She worked a a colour sports commentator, a consultant, a stock trader and earned a law degree. In 1994 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of fame. In 2013 she became a member of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. Kay is married to Mike Teli. Kay also continues to inspire young rowers. (2018)
 
Shooting      back
Myriam Bedard See Skiing Alpine and cross country.
Vera Holdsworth Died September 23, 2002.  Vera had a remarkable career as one of Canada's outstanding trapshooters. She was an Alberta Champion nineteen times, a Canadian Ladies Champion thirteen times, the 1959 North American Ladies Champion, and was the 1st woman to qualify for both the Canadian and American Trapshooting Teams. She also qualified for the All-Canadian and All-American Teams in her chosen sport. In 1961, she competed as a member of the Canadian Men's Team with a personal score of 99 out of 100. Vera Holdsworth is a life member of the Amateur Trapshooting Association of America and the Alberta Trapshooting Association. She was inducted into the Alberta Trapshooting Hall of Fame; named All-American five times, captain of the All-Canada Trap Team; and, voted to the Sports Field Magazine Award All-American Trapshooting Team. Since induction update: Canadian Ladies Champion: 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972. Source: Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. Online. (Accessed February 2014)
 
Susan Nattrass. Born Medicine Hat, Alberta November 5, 1950. She was taught to shoot by her father when she was 17 and by 19 she defeated 1300 men at an international shoot in Nevada! In the 1976 Olympics in Montreal she was the only woman entered in the trap shooting event. In the 1990 Commonwealth Games she became the first woman to be entered in a shotgun event. She has set 4 world records and has been World Champion on 7 occasions. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Linda Thom.  Born Hamilton, Ontario December 30, 1943. She is a strong and highly motivated Olympic medalist. She first became interested in shooting as a child, when she learned the basics of the sport from her shooting enthusiast father. She successfully entered pistol competitions in 1969. By the mid 1970's she concentrated on her career as a chef and on family life. She took up the challenge of shooting again when it was announced that women would compete in this event in the Olympic Games.  Her pistol individual gold medal in the 1984 Los Angeles games was the first for a Canadian women and the first gold medal for a Canadian woman since 1928. Linda felt that the Gold Medal belonged to all the people of Canada, and she carried it with here wherever she went so that people could see and touch the medal for themselves. Linda is the first pistol shooter included into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She is also a member of the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Amateur Sports Hall of Fame. In 1985 she received the Order of Canada.
 
Skiing Alpine and Cross Country       back
Janet "Jay" Barbara Action

Born April 10, 1941, Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Died October 18, 2012, Ottawa, Ontario. Her Aunt Ida introduced her to the sport of skiing when she was a young girl and she was hooked for life. As a teen she was a top Ontario slalom, downhill and cross country skier. She was a member of the Canadian Junior ski championship team and attended the Olympic Training School in Quebec. She was instrumental in founding the Kirkland Lake Ski Club and served willingly as it’s Director. She would involve her entire family including her husband Peter Maheux and her five children. Her niece Brigitte skied for Canada in 2006 and 2010 Olympics. Source: Lives Lived, Globe and Mail, January 16, 2013. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.
 

Myriam Bedard.



Biathlon
Myriam Bedard.  Born December 22, 1969 Neufchatel, Quebec.  As a teenager with the Royal Canadian Army Cadets she took up biathlon, the sport  combining shooting and skiing, and entered her 1st competition on rented skis.By 1987 she was Canadian junior champion.  In 1991 she was the 2nd Canadian to win a World Cup in Biathlon. She won a bronze medal in the Olympic games in 1992 when women's biathlon was a demonstration sport.  The next year it was a  a gold at the World Championship. She went n to win gold for the 7.5 km inaugural event, and a gold in the 15 km event at the 1994 Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway.  She was the 1st non-European to win gold in Biathlon.  She received the Lou Marsh Trophy for the year's top performance by a Canadian athlete as well as the Velma Springstead Trophy as Canada’s top female athlete in 1994. She is a member of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. She is also an honorary member of the Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario. She left the sport to give birth to her daughter but never had a successful return to her sport. After the 1998 Winter Olympics she retired officially. In the early 200's she became embroiled in Political Scandal. December 8, 2006 she was in trouble with the law and accused of kidnapping her daughter and fleeing to the United States. She was found guilty of child abduction and sentenced to a conditional discharge and two years probation. A contempt of court charge saw her serving 45 days of community service.
 
Sarah Burke Born September 3, 1982 Midland, Ontario. Died January 19, 2012 Park City, Utah, U.S.A. In 2001 she earned the ESPN Award for Female Skier of the year. In 2004 she actively lobbied ESPN to add a women's division for freestyle skiing following the Winter X Games. The new division was added in 2005. Sara won her 1st gold medal at the Fédération Internationale du Ski (FIS) Freestyle World Ski Championships in Kuusamo, Finland. In 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2011 she dominated super pipe competition taking gold medals. In 2007 she earned the EPSY Award for Best Female Actions Sport Athlete. She died as the result of a training incident. Sarah is a Member of the Ontario Sport Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Edwina Chamier Born March 27, 1890, Chester, Nova Scotia. Died May 31, 1981, Hampshire, United Kingdom. In 1918 she married Adrian Chamier (1883-1974) who was knighted in 1944. The couple had two sons. In 1936, the future Lady Chamier represented Canada I alpine skiing at the Olympic Games in Germany. While she did not place in the top categories she was at 45 years and 318 days old, the oldest women in these winter games. Source: Sports Reference Olympic sports, Online (accessed April 2015) 
 
Elizabeth Anne 'Betsy' Clifford. née Clifford. Born October 15, 1953, Ottawa, Ontario. By the time she was 5 years old she was comfortable on skis and was winning competitions at 8. At 12 she was Canadian Junior Champion and at 13 she was Canadian women’s champion. Participating in the 1968 Olympic Games, Grenoble, France at 14 made her the youngest Canadian skier at the events. From 1968 through 1976 she was voted Ottawa’s Outstanding Skier dominated 3 alpine skiing disciplines: Downhill, Slalom and giant Slalom. At 16 she was the youngest person to win world ski title with a giant slalom gold medal at Val Gardena, Italy in 1970. The next year she won the women’s special slalom title in Val-d’Isère, France. In 1972 she suffered a freak accident and broke her heels. In 1973 she Was back in competition and in 1974 she won a silver medal at the World Championships downhill at St, Moritz, Switzerland and her 3rd World Cup downhill. Back in Canada she won the Can-Am giant slalom. She was twice Canadian Athlete of the Year. Betsey was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1970 and the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1971.  Upon her retirement from competition in 1976 at the age of 23, she was awarded the John Semmelink Memorial Award by the Canadian Ski Association in recognition of how a skier through sportsmanship, conduct and ability, best represents Canada in international competition.  In 1978 she was nominated to the American National Ski Hall of Fame. In 1982 she became a member of the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame and in 1983 she became a member of the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame. In 1995 she was induced into Les Panthéon des sports de l’Outaouais and the Laurentian Ski Hall of Fame.
 
Judith 'Judy' MacPherson Crawford-Rawley Born December 22, 1951, Toronto, Ontario. Judy on her 16th birthday in 1967, became the 1st Ontario-based skier to make the Canadian Women's Alpine Ski team and remained with the team for seven years until her retirement in 1974-75. She was the top Canadian female skier in 1971 and 1973. She won the U.S. National championship title in 1971 and the European Cup race in France in 1973. In the 1972 Sapporo, Japan Winter Olympics she placed 4th in the slalom just fractions of a second out of the medals. In World Cup competition from 1969-1974 she finished among the top 10 competitors 23 times, 5 times in Downhill, 4 in Giant Slalom and 14 times in Slalom.  . She holds the John Semmelink Trophy for achievement in skiing, and sportsmanship. After her retirement from competition she settled in Ottawa and  spent 34 years coaching skiing at the Development Level in the National Capital Outaouais at Camp Fortune and Mont Cascade. Judy holds the Dave Murray Coach of the Year Award presented to the most outstanding Coach for a year, in recognition of her work. Judy is a member of the Canadian Ski Museum and Canadian Ski Hall of Fame as of 1995.  Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977
 
Linda Crutchfield-Bocock Born April 3, 1942, Shawinigan, Quebec. At 17 she competed in her 1st major ski race on Mount Tremblant. In 1964 she won the Ryan Cup in skiing and she became a member of the Canadian National Alpine Ski Team from 1960-1964 and participated in the 1964 Olympics where she competed in Downhill, Giant Slalom and Slalom events. Her summer interests where in water-skiing and she held 14 water ski titles and established several jump records becoming the 1st Canadian woman to clear 100 feet in the water-ski jump. She would represent Canada at 4 world water-ski championships and was a water-ski school director for 3 years. Back on the snow slopes she in 1962, 1964 she was Canadian Alpine Champion. She became interested in luge, the one person toboggan, excelling as Canadian champion 1967-8 and North American Champion in 1968. She also competed in Luge at the Grenoble, France 1968 Olympic Games placing10th in women’s luge.  In 1964 she won the John Semmelink Trophy and in 1969 and 1973 she was the Canadian Female Athlete of the year.  . In 1984 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977; Canadian Skiing Sport Hall of Fame Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Sharon Anne Firth Born December 31, 1953, Aklavik, North West Territories. Sharon and her twin sister Shirley were members of Canada’s national cross-country team for 17 consecutive years. 1969 Canadian cross country championships skier as a junior placing 3rd and winning gold in 3 x 5 relay team. She was back winning medals 1971-1976.  In 1974 she won the North American championship in 10 Kilometers, 5 Kilometers, and the team 3 X 5 Relay. In 1990 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame.  She also competed in 4 winter Olympic Games. In 2015 the twins became the 1st indigenous women to be inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Laurie Graham-Flynn Born March 30,1960 Inglewood, Ontario ( sometimes recorded as Orangeville, Ontario) Laurie began ski racing since the age of 9, She made the national Ski team in 1977-78.In 1979 she placed third at a World Downhill event in Val D'Isere, France.  Within the the next decade she would dominate international women's downhill ski racing.  In 1983 she became the 1st North American woman to win a world Super Grand Slalom and the 1st to win this event on home soil in Mount-Tremblant, Quebec.  She recorded two World Cup Downhill victories along with 2 second and 3 third place finishes.  The winner of a total of six World Cup races, Laurie also represented Canada at the Olympics in 1980, 1984 and 1988.  In 1988 Laurie retired from competition after an eleven-year career and in November of that year she was invested into the Order of Canada. The following ski season Laurie was a colour commentator on CBC sports and she went on to host the nationally televised ski show Passport to Skiing. She continues to do commentary for the Sports Network (TSN) and ESPN. In 1991 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame and in 1993 the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.  In 2015 she was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. Laurie is a graduate of the University of Toronto. (2018)
 
Nancy Greene-Raine. Born May 11, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario. Nancy slapped on her 1st set of skis when she was just 3 years old! A skier of determination, Nancy won the 1967 World Cup and dominated the racing scene the next year as well winning a gold medal in the giant slalom and a silver medal in the slalom at the Olympic games as well as her second World Cup.  She was awarded the Order of Canada in 1967 and named Athlete of the year in 1968.  Nancy married Al Raine and the couple have tin sons. upon retirement she had earned 17 Canadian championships titles and 3 U.S. Ski Championship titles. She has served as a member of the Task Force on  Canadian Sport for the federal government She became a member of the Canadian Sports hall of Fame in 1967. In 1992 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame. In 1999 she was named Canada's Female Athlete of the Century by the Canadian Press. Source: Nancy Greene, Canadian Sport Hall of Fame. Online. Accessed march 2004.
 
Anne Heggtveit Born Ottawa, Ontario January 11,1939. A member of a skiing family, Anne, came to international attention at the age of 15 when she won the 1954 Holmenkollen Giant Slalom event in Norway, the youngest winner in the events’ 50 year history.  At the 1960 Squaw Valley Olympics she won an Olympic Gold Medal for Canada. In that same year she won the giant slalom and combined women’s alpine titles the 1st time ever by a non European.
 
Sue Holloway-Joy Born May 19, 1955, Halifax, Nova Scotia. . Sue was a 4 time Olympian competing in 1976 in Cross Country Skiing and Kayak, 1980 and Kayak again in 1984 where she took Silver and Bronze medals. Although Canada withdrew from the Moscow Olympics in 1980 she was the appointed Olympic flag bearer. She was the 1st Canadian woman to ever compete in both winter and summer Olympic Games in the same year. In the 1984 summer Olympic Games she won bronze in the canoeing k4-500 event with Alexandra Barré, Lucie Guay and Barb Olmsted and a silver med in the K2-500 event with Alexandra Barré. Retiring shortly after the games she would use her education from the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University and George Brown College taking up coaching and sports administration In 1986 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame and the Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame. . She married in 2002 and she and  her husband, former Olympian Greg Joy, now work together as motivational speakers. In 2008 she returned to her Brookfield High School to be inducted into the school Hall of Fame. Source: Sports Resource/ Olympic Sports. Online Accessed 2009.
 
Claudia Kerckhoff-van Wijk She proved herself a worthy competitor in a male dominated sport. She held the Canadian Women’s Whitewater Kayaking Championship position for an entire decade from 1974-1984. She was the first woman and the youngest competitor to participate in the grueling ten sections of the Coureurs des bois gold category in the Canadian Ski Marathon.  She now owns and operates Madawaska Kanu Centre which is the first kayak and canoe school in North America.
 
Kathy Kreiner- Phillips. Born May 4, 1957 Timmons, Ontario. Kathy was introduced to skiing when she was just three years old. She began World Cup competition when she was just 14, the year she joined the national ski team. She won her 1st World Cup race a Pfronten, West Germany in 1974.  She made the Olympic team in 1972 placing fourth in the Giant Slalom. In 1974 she won the gold medal in the Skiing World Cup giant slalom and two years later, at her second Olympics, she captured the gold medal in the giant slalom event. It was the only Canadian medal in Innsbruck. In 1976 she was named Canada’s outstanding female athlete of the year taking the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award and was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She participated in the 1980 Winter Olympic Games at Lake Placid, New York, U.S.A. but did not make the podium. She retired from competition in 1981. After earning her BA from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A. she studied at the University of Ottawa earning a Master's Degree in sports psychology.  Kathy married former freestyle skier Dave Phillips. She is the owner and a consultant at Momentus Mental Training. She has consulted with numerous National, Provincial and club level teams since 1990. 
 
Lucie Laroche. Born October 23, 1968. Her youthful  love of skiing led her to become a member of a group of freestyle skiers known as the "Quebec Air Force".
 
Kerrin Lee-Gartner. Born September 21, 1966 Trail, British Columbia.  She grew up in Rossland B.C. and became a member of the elite group of skiers to hold an Olympic Gold medal.  Kerrin began skiing with the Canadian Women’s Ski Team in 1982. She had several knee operations and has had two complete reconstructions of her knees. Her 1st World Cup in December 1990 she made the podium. In 1992 Winter Olympics in Albertville, France she took the gold medal becoming the 1st in history for a Canadian (male or female) on the downhill event in an Olympic games. That same year she was inducted into the Order of British Columbia.  Kerrin finished 8th in super –G at the Olympic Games in Norway and retired from international completion at the end of the 1994 World Cup Season.  She had worked with CBC television as a sports broadcaster and has assisted the BBC with coverage in the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games. Kerrin and her husband Max Gartner volunteer at the Fernie Alpine Ski club, where both their daughters ski. . Max coaches, while Kerrin does whatever is required, from gate-keeping to setting up safety nets.: Kerrin also raises funds for Project Safety, a program she founded that examines all safety elements of ski racing. Sources: The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (accessed 2007); The Canadian Ski Museum (accessed October 2010) ; Mathew Sekeres, Where are they now? Kerrin Lee-Gartner. The Globe and Mail June 8, 2009.
 
Judi Lea Leinweber-Chapman Born June 13, 1950 Kimberly , British Columbia. When she was 12 and again at 15 Judi won at the Canadian Junior championship in skiimg. In 1969 she took the top senior title at Whistler Mountain. 1968 sheems to have been her year as she was second at the U.S. Championships, 5th at the Wold Cup slalome even in Oslo, Norway and was a member of the Canadian Olympic team with such tame mates as Nancy Green in Grenoble, France. Judi married Currie Chapman and the couple has one son. (2018)
 
Kate Pace Born February 13, 1967, North Bay, Ontario. She started skiing at the age of two! By the time she was five she was racing! She skied and raced with the North Bay Ski Racers and was soon with the North Ontario Division and the Ontario Ski Team. In 1984 she was Junior Champion for Northern Ontario Ski Division. In 1985 and 1987 she won a National Achievement Award.  In May 1988 she qualified as a member of Canada’s National Women’s Alpine team, a membership that lasted ten years. She competed internationally with the Federation International du ski (FIS) World Cup circuit 64 times in downhill and super G. In 1993 she was 1st place at FIS World Ski Championships Downhill event in Morioka, Japan and took 1st place in two World Cup events. That same year she was Ontario’s and Canada’s Female Athlete of the year.  In 1994 she was ranked no 2 in World Cup competition, downhill events. In 1995 she took gold in FIS Downhill Cortina, Italy ;  2 gold in Super G at Mount Tremblant, Quebec and a third at Mont Ste Marie, Quebec, an event that she also won in 1996. In 1997 she took 1st at the European Cup downhill in Switzerland. During the 1990’s she also won national and North American events in downhill and super G. In 1998 She was presented with the Winterstart Award by Alpine Canada. She has received the Governor General of Canada’s Canadian Medal 125 in 1992, has been inducted into the North Bay Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian ski Hall of Fame and was awarded the United States Air Force Achievement Award on two occasions. She is married to Mark Lindsay. In addition to her awards and medals the City of North Bay has named a sports walk/run/cycling and online skating path the Kate Pace Way. Source: The Canadian Ski Hall of Fame Online Accessed June 2013.
 
Karen Percy. Born October 10, 1966.  At the 1988 Calgary Olympic Games she became the first skier in 20 years to win two Olympic medals in the same games. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Gabrielle 'Gaby' Pleau Born 1920. Gaby loved winter sports and a ten she entered her 1st cross-country ski race. She would go on to earn trophies and medals in both nordi (cross-country0 and alpine ski events not only in her home province of Quebec but also in the north eastern United States. From 1938 through 1946 she placed in the top three in provincial, national and North American Competitions. She was given the name of ‘Snow Queen of the 1940’s’. In 1946 she joined the Canadian Olympic Ski Team to participate in the 1948 Winter Olympic Games in St Moritz, France. She was the 1st Francophone woman to join Canada’s downhill ski team. Shortly after being selected she had a serious injury and her days of competitive sport were finished. After recuperating she founded Club-Ecole Saint Castin, a ski club for girls and women which would be the largest ski centre in the Quebec City region and would serve the province for 28 years.  In 1965 she became the Canadian delegate to the Federation International d ski (FIS). She participated in a number of organizing committees for World Cup events. From 1946 through 1963 she worked to promote both nordi and alpine skiing in her home province. In 1984 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame. In 1999 she received the Ordre de la Renommee du ski de Quebec.
 
Dorothy "Dee" Anne Read (née Burden) Born June 21, 1926, Montreal , Quebec. Died May 8, 2004, Calgary, Alberta. She learned to ski as a child in the Laurentians just north of Montreal, Quebec. In 1948 she was Dominion Champion in Alpine downhill racing. She married hockey player John Read and t he Ottawa couple had four children. The family relocated to Calgary in 1968. Two of her children, Ken and Jim were Olympic team skiers as was her grandson Stefan in 2006. Dee herself became an alpine racing coach and technical expert She served for 17 years as a technical delegate to  the International Ski Federation. She worked with the Alberta Alpine Ski Association and was a Board member of Alpine Canada. In 1990 the Calgary Booster Club named her Sportsman of the Year. In 2001 she was inducted into the Canadian Skiing Hall of Fame. In 2005 she was included as one of one hundred outstanding contributors to sport and recreation in Alberta. At 77, just two weeks before her death she was on the slopes skiing. Source: Herstory 2008: the Canadian Women’s Calendar (Coteau Books, 2007) : Dorothy (Dee) Read, Matriarch of Canadian Ski Family, Dies at 77, in Ski Racing: the International Journal of Snow Sport Competition Online (Accessed January 2014)
 
Sara Renner

Cross-Country
Born April 10, 1976, Golden, British Columbia Cross country skiing was a way of life for the young Sara who joined her local ski club at 12. She would go on to win world championships and World Cup medals and a silver medal in the team sprint at the Turin Olympic Games in 2006 where Norwegian coach B. Hakensmoen gave Sara a ski pole after hers was broken during the competition a true selfless act of sportsmanship.  Married an alpine skier Thomas Grandi and in 2007 the couple had a daughter. Sara retired from competitive cross country skiing after participating in the 2010 Olympic Games, Vancouver.  Source: Herstory; The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2010.
 
Liisa Savigarvi.  Born December 29,1963 Bracebridge, Ontario. She learned to ski at 14 months! She was a national competitor at 14 years. She burst onto the alpine ski scene in 1980 with great performances in the Ontario and Canadian Junior Championships. She was a member of the Canada Ski Team in the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Bosnia Herzegovina. In 1985 she was overall alpine Canadian Champion. In 1986 she was named Ski Racing's Alpine Skier of the year and awarded the National Alpine Ski Team (NAST) Kodak Award of Excellence. She was forced out of competition in 1987-88 season after shattering her knee and injuring her back while in World Cup training. She continued her involvement in the sport as a Canadian Ski Instructors' Alliance Level 111 Coach with the Canadian Ski Coaches Federation and co-proprietor of Ski Escape, an independent travelling ski school  with operations in four provinces and 30 Programmes across Canada. In 1997 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame.
 
Beckie Scott Born Vegreville, Alberta August 1, 1974. She began cross country skiing at the age of five and her passion for competition was stirred when she won her first competition at age 7. Scott is a two-time Olympian. She participated at the 1998 Winter Olympic Games in Nagano, Japan and the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Scott won a gold medal in cross-country skiing at the Salt Lake City games. She originally finished third in the five-kilometer pursuit, but she was soon upgraded to the gold medal when winner and runner-up were disqualified for using darbepoetin, a performance-enhancing drug. She became the first Canadian and first North American woman to win an Olympic medal in cross-country skiing. Her Olympic gold medal was presented to her in a ceremony in Calgary, Alberta and She was extremely proud to be the first Canadian winter sport athlete to receive a gold medal at home in Canada. In addition to her superb athletic accomplishments, Scott is equally well known for her outspoken stand on anti-doping and drug-free competition. She relentlessly challenged the International Ski Federation (ISF) to be more aggressive in its efforts to catch cheats. She never dreamed she would be a direct benefactor of those efforts. On March 29, 2005 Scott agreed to join the World Anti-Doping Agency’s athlete committee. Aware of the world outside of sport, she spearheaded a Canadian team challenge to donate all prize money won from the Continental Cup competition in British Columbia to the UNICEF efforts in Afghanistan. The Beckie Scott Nordic Centre at Panorama Mountain Village in Invermere, British Columbia, has been named in her honour. She is a member of the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Stephanie Sloan Stephanie has always enjoyed skiing. In 1980 and 1981 she was freestyle world cup ski champion. A pioneer in freestyle she noticed that girls were not attending lessons in freestyle skiing like the boys. She started the Whistler/Blackcomb’s womens only ski program one of the 1st of its kind in the world. She married Dave Murray (died 1990) a member of the famous group of men skiers known as the “Crazy Canucks”. The couple had one daughter. Stephanie is President of the Dave Murray Enterprises which runs ski and snowboard camps. While living in Whistler, British Columbia as well as holding down a job in real estate, and teaching skiing , Stephanie, served as president f the Whistler Nordic Ski Club, was active on the Whistler Parks and Recreation Advisory Commission and was an elected member of town council.  Source: Stephanie Sloan.  Pique Newspaper online November 5, 1999.
 
Gerry Sorensen-Lenihan Born October 15, 1958 Kimberly, British Columbia. Gerry began skiing when she was ten years old. In 1980 she became a member of the Canadian Women's National Alpine Ski Team. January 1981 in a World Cup Race in Megeve, France she had her 1st victory. In February  8, 1981 she won the World Championship downhill event in Haus, Austria. In February 1981 the Sports Federation of Canada voter her Athlete of the Month. She would win the down hill back to back events in  January 1982, Grindelwald, Switzerland. That year she received a World Champion Award from the Canadian government in their Tribute to Champions and was voted by the Canadian Press winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Tope Female Athlete of the Year. In her home province she was Best Athlete of the Year in 1981 and 1982. In 1984 she again captured the down hill and went on to win the combined event in Puy St. Vincent, France earning a Sport Excellence Award from the Canadian Government in the 1984 Tribute to Champions.  She retired from competition in 1984. In 1988 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame and the following year she became a member of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. Gerry is married and lives with her husband and children in California, U.S.A.
 
Mélanie Turgeon.  Born Alma, Quebec October 21,1976. As a baby her father carried her in a back pack when he skied down the slopes! As a junior in 1994 she won 5 medals! This Quebec skier has raced Slalom, Downhill, and Super G for the Canadian Ski Team since 1992.    In 1998 she was the top Canadian skier in the World Cup. In 2001 she became the first Canadian to win two Two World Cup medals in one day! She place # 1 at the World Championship down hill races.
 
Lucille Wheeler Born Montreal, Quebec January 14,  1935. Lucille first skied when she was two years old! At 12 she was the national junior ski champion and named to the Canadian National Ski Team at 14!. In 1956 she won bronze at the Cortina Olympic Games and became the first ever Canadian Olympic ski Medalist. In 1958 she won both the downhill and giant slalom event at the World Championships. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Lauren Woolstencroft

Born Calgary, Alberta November 24, 1981. Lauren was born missing both legs below the knees and missing her left arm below the elbow. This never held her back! She was taught how to ski when she was 4 years old. While she was exposed to learning other sports such as horseback riding she soon became bored with these other sports. She started ski racing as a teen of 14 when a friend convinced her to join the Alberta disabled Ski Team. She attended the university of British Columbia and earned a degree in electrical engineering. She is proud to work for BC Hydro. In 1998 she joined the Canadian Disabled Alpine Ski Team.  An accomplished participant in the Paralympics Games in 2002 she won 2 gold medals in Super G and Slalom as well as a bronze medal in Giant Slalom. That same year she was British Columbia’s Female Athlete of the Year also winning the Whang Youi Dai Award. Back at the 2006 Turin, Italy Paralympics Games there was a gold medal in Giant Slalom and Silver in the Super G. In 2007 during the International Paralympics Games she was named the Best Female Athlete and was inducted into the Terry Fox Hall of Fame. Although she though of retiring she returned to the 2010 Paralympics Games at Whistler, British Columbia to win 5 gold medals (Giant Slalom, Super G. Downhill, Slalom,& super combined.) She is the first Canadian to win 3 or more gold medals during a Paralympics Games. She was very proud to be the person to carry the Canadian Flag for the Turin Games closing ceremony. Source: Petro Canada. Paralympics School Program Lauren Woolstencroft http://paralympiceducation.ca accessed June 2011.
 

Skydiving  
Kathy Cox-Sutton In 1973, 1978 and 1980 she took 1st place overall in the Canadian National Parachuting Championships. In 1975 she broke her fibula and her tibia but retuned to her sport in 1976. In 1980 she won the Gold Medal in a Women’s Individual  Accuracy at the XV World Parachuting Championships. In August of that year she was elected as Canadian Athlete of the month and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) lauded her as Athlete of the year. In 1981 she was Women’s Overall Champion at an invitational event in China. In 1984 she was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada. Kathy married fellow skydiver Steve Sutton.
 
   
Soccer  
Carrie Serwetnyk

Born Hamilton, Ontario. July 17, 1965. When her family moved to Mississauga, Ontario she played soccer for the Peel-Halton Soccer Association. Eventually her promising skills in the sport earner her a scholarship to the University of North Carolina in the USA. In 1985 she was the leading scorer and was voted the team’s offensive MVP of the year. She played in the NCAA women’s finals on winning teams in 1985 and 1985. Back home in Ontario for the summers she also played in the Canadiana Nation Championships / She played 19 times for Canada’s full national team. She played in competition in Taipei and in Cuangzhou China in the late 1980’s. Between 1988 and 1990 she played in France where the team reached the national final. In the spring of 1992 she signed to a Japanese Club and played in the 10 team Japanese Women’s League where she was the leader in number of goals in the league. In 1993 she came back from a knee injury and helped her team win their championships and the national tournament . In 2001 she was inducted into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame. Source: thesoccerhalloffame.ca Accessed March 2007.
 

Christine Margaret Sinclair

Born June 12, 1983 Burnaby, British Columbia. Born June 12, 1983 Burnaby, British Columbia.  As a youth she played both baseball and soccer. She played with the Boys league for baseball and the Burnaby Girls Soccer and was a player of achievement in both sports. She would accompany her soccer team to provincial wins as well as National games. At the University of Portland her academic standings were all American as well as in sport where she was college woman athlete of the year for her soccer efforts. In 2000 she made her debut with the Canadian National Soccer team. In 2003, 2007 and 2011 the team was in the FIFA world cup and in 2008 they played at the Olympic Games. In 2011 there were international gold medals and in 2012 at the London Olympic Games she scored 6 goals in the last game to bring home bronze medal for Team Canada. She was honoured to carry the Canadian flag at the closing ceremonies. She has been winner of the Canadian Soccer player of the year ten times by 2012. From 2002 through 2012 she as been one of the tope 5 players in world status. In December 2012 won the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s top athlete after having won the  Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as top Canadian Female Athlete. In 2013 she was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame Source: Beverly Smith “What it takes to be a champion” The Globe and Mail, July 1, 2006. : Canadian Women’s Soccer Association online (Accessed December 2011) : Olympics Canada online biographies. Accessed June 2013. ; Canada’s Walk of Fame Online accessed June 2013.
 

Speed skating       back
Christine Isabel Boudrias Born September 3, 1972.  Montreal, Quebec. A member of the Canadian National Speed Skating Team since 1990/91, Christine is a 3 time Olympian making her 1st appearance in 1972 in Albertville, France and with  a silver medal in the 3000 meter relay team in Lillehammer Olympic Games1994 for the 3000 meter relay team with Isabelle Charest (1971-   ), Angela Cutrone (1969-   ) and Nathalie Lambert and a bronze medal in Nagano, Japan Olympic Games in 1998. She holds 3 gold medals and 1 bronze medal in World Speed Skating Championships along with World Team Championships gold, 2 silver, and 2 bronze medals from 1992-1998
 
Lela Alene Brooks Lela Brooks Born February 7, 1908, Toronto, Ontario. Died September 12, 1990, Owen Sound, Ontario. Her parents enjoyed winter sports and encouraged their daughter in her pursuit of speed skating. Without a coach or a planned training program. she would take her love the the sport to the highest competition allowed to women at the time. She was the 1st woman admitted to the Old Orchard Skating Club in Toronto. From 1923 to 1935 she would be called the "Queen of the blades." She won more that 65 championships fro the provincial level to world championships. In 1924 she earned 19 titles including 3 Canadian titles and three international titles. In 1924 alone she broke 6 world records and by 1927 the teen held 2 world championships titles.  She was the 1st Canadian woman world champion. She dominated events from the short 220 yard events to the one mile event (1600 m) She participated in the 1932 Olympics at lake Placid only to place 4th overall. Her time in the 1500 m heats was 2:54;o was more than 15 seconds under the official record but could not be recognized because she skated under the North American mass start rules!  While she qualified for the 1936 Olympics she decided to retire and not to participate. Later that year she married Russ Campbell and the couple settled in Owen Sound, Ontario. In 1972 she was inducted into the Canadian Speed Skating Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.  Source: Canadian Sports Hall of Fame Accessed 2001.
 
Sylvie Burka Born Winnipeg, Manitoba June 4, 1954. A top speed skater and cyclist she burst onto the Canadian sports scene first as a cyclist taking the 1970 Coors International Bike classic. She switched to speed skating and she took the 1973 world junior speed skating title. Set over 40 Canadian records and won 5 national speed skating titles. She won the world senior championship in 1976 and the sprint championship the next year. In cycling whe won three gold medals at the western Canada Games
 
Isabelle Charest-Charbonneau née Charest. Born January 3, 1971, Rimouski, Quebec. Isabelle joined the national speed skating team in 1988. She is a 3 time Canadian Olympian who competed in the 1994 Winter Olympics winning the silver medal in the 3000 meter relay with Christine Isabel Boudrias (1972-   ), and Nathalie Lambert (1963-   ). She was Canadian champion from 1995 through 1999. In 1995 was named the Canadian Female Athlete of the Year by Speed Skating Canada.  She really shone in speed skating in 1996 taking gold and silver medals in the 500 meter and 1,000 meter events at the World Championships. She would set a new world record in the former competition that she held as long as she was Canadian champion. In March 1997 she became the 1st woman to skate the 500 meter in under 45 seconds! That season she was named Canadian Female Athlete of the Year.  In the1998 Winter Olympics she won a bronze medal with the Canadian team in the 300 meter relay and in the 500 meter event. In the 2002 Winter Olympics she won bronze medal with the Canadian team in the 3000 meter relay. She took time to complete her Bachelor degree in nutrition from the University of Montreal before returning to competition in mid 1999. Taking a short leave from the sport in 2001 she married Steve Charbonneau of the Montreal Alouettes football team.  In the 2002 Winter Olympic Games she won another bronze medal in the 3,000 meter relay. After these games she retired from competition. She is a member of the Speed Skating Canada Hall of Fame. She runs the Cardio Energy Center in Granby, Quebec. Source: sports-reference.com (Accessed September 2015); Team Canada 2002 Games www.canoe.ca/2002TeamCanadaBiosA2M (accessed September 2015)
 
Angela Cutrone Born January 19, 1969, St. Leonard, Quebec. At the 1987 Canada Winter Games, she and her teammates Annie Perreault, Danielle Gervais, and Cathy Morin placed 1st in the 3,000 meter speed skating relay. She was later a member a team, which included Nathalie Lambert (1963-   ), Isabelle Charest (1971-   ), and Christine Boudrias (1972-   ) that held a 3,000 meter relay world record from March 28, 1993 until March 19, 1995. From 1986 through 1994 she won a gold medal in the 3,000 meter relay every year at the World Championships. She was part of the 1992 Olympic Games gold winning women’s relay team with Sylvie Daigle, Annie Perreault and Natalie Lambert (1963-   ). Angela qualified as an alternate on the 3,000 meter relay team at the 1994 Winter Olympics. She did not compete in the event, however, and was therefore not awarded a silver medal with the rest of the Canadian team of Christine Charest (1972-   ), Christine Isabel Boudrias (1971-   ), and Nathalie Lambert (1963-   ). Angela retired from active competition in 1995. Source: sports-reference.com (Accessed September 2015);
 
Sylvie Daigle.  Born February 29, 1962 Sherbrooke, Quebec.  She began speed skating when she was 8 years old. She competed for the 1st time in 1979 in long track speed skating at the Canada Winter Games winning gold in 500 metre, 1000 metre and 1500 metre events. In 1980 at the Winter Olympic Games in Lack Placid, New York, U.S.A. she only placed 19th in the 500 metre. She won the Elaine Tanner Award for best Canadian Junior Athlete in 1979 and 1983. Returning to the Olympic Games in 1984 she again was well back in the pack. In the mid 1980's she suffered pain in her knees and she began to only participate in short track speed skating winning the overall short track at the World Championship in 1979 and 1983. In 1988 at the Calgary Olympic Games she won a gold in the 1500 meter, a silver in the 1000 metre and 3000 metre a bronze in the 500 metre and the 3000 metre relay. She was Female Athlete of the Year for the Canadian Speed Skating Association in 1988, 1989 and 1991.  1988 saw her win the Overall World Championship which she would win again in 1989 and 1990 becoming the 1st skater to win 5 Overall World titles. In 1991 she was inducted into the Olympic Hall of Fame.  In the Albertville, France Winter Olympic Games in 1992 she won gold in the 3000 metre relay but lost the race in the 500 metre after a collision with another skater. She suspended her medical studies at the Université of Montreal to win a silver medal in the 1994 Lillehammer, Norway Winter Olympic Games. She retired from sports to complete her medical degree in 1998.
 
Catriona LeMay Doan.   Born December 23, 1970 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.  This young skater from the Canadian prairies is a member of the national long track speed skating team.  She won 2 medals in the Olympics in Nagano, Japan.  In 1997-8 she was the fastest woman on ice!  She lost only one 500m race all year! In 2002 at the Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games she the 500m title a second time. She was World Sprint Champion in 1998 and 2002 and World Champion 500 m 1998,1999 and 2001. In 200 she won a 500 m bronze. She won the 500m World cup 4 time from 1998 to 2002. November 22, 1997 she became the 1st woman to break the 38 second barrier for the 500 m skating 37.90 in Calgary, Alberta. Within the next 4 years she broke this record 6 times and on December 2001 she did 37.22.No other woman has set eight consecutive World Records in one distance. Between 7 January 2001 and 24 February 2001, Le May Doan even had the 14 best times ever skated on that distance. Catriona retired from competitive skating in 2003. She married Bart Doan, a rodeo cowboy and the couple have two children. She is actively involved in public speaking where she is challenging and motivating people to achieve their full potential. She is also an Olympic broadcaster for the CBC TV> In 2002 she published an autobiography called Going for Gold.
 
Clara Hughes Born September 27, 1972 Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was inspired watching Canadian Speed skater Gaetan Boucher at the 1888 Olympics to get into sports. By 1990 she began competing in cycling and by 2015 had been 18 times Canadian National Cycling champion.. She has silver and bronze medals from the 1991 and 1995 Pan American Games; a silver medal from the 1994 Commonwealth Games; a silver medal from the 1995 World Championships. In the 1996 Olympics she won 2 bronze medals which were Canada's first cycling medals in 100 years! She holds 6 Olympic medals in the sports of cycling and speed skating making her the 1st athlete in history to win multiple medals in both Summer and Winter Olympic Games. She felt privileged to carry the Canadian flag for the 2010 Canada Olympic Games.  She has also given personally to her causes. After winning Gold in 2006 Games she donated $10,000 to the Right to Play programs challenging Canadians to support the cause. In 2010 she again donated $10,000 personally to the Vancouver inner city school program, ‘Take a Hike’ which gives youth at risk a better direction in life. She became the National Spokesperson for Bell Canada’s Mental Health initiative and the Let’s Talk campaign. She shared her personal battles with depression to help break down the stigma associated with mental illness. She has been appointed to the Order of Manitoba and the Order of Canada. She was awarded the International Olympic Committees Sport and the Community award for her efforts promoting the values of sport and play around the globe. Since 2013 she has initiated annual bike rides across Canada in order to raise awareness for mental health. In 2001 Clara married Peter Guzman and in 2014 he cycled the annual cross country ride with his wife. Clara also has a Star on Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto. Sources: Clara Hughes, Olympian, Humanitarian, Motivator, Clara Hughes Website Online (accessed 2011) ; Gayle Macdonald, ‘On the eve of her cross-country bike tour, Clara Hughes speaks out about depression’, The Globe and Mail March 13, 2014.
 
Cindy Klassen Born Winnipeg, Manitoba August 12, 1976. It seems Cindy has always loved and been involved in sports. In 1994 she was a member of the field Lacrosse team in a demonstration sport at the Commonwealth Games. In 1996 she was a member of Canada's National Junior Women's Hokey team. Her real love however is speed skating which she began when she was 18. In 2002 she was second in the world all-round championships. February 10, 2002 she won the Canada's first medal of the 2002 Olympic Games, a bronze, in the 3000m event.  In 2003 she clinched the number one spot as World All-round Speed Skating Champion. in 2005, suffering from a bad cold she was second in this world event.
 
Natalie Lambert Born December 1, 1963, Montreal, Quebec. From 1985 to 1987 and 1990 to 1994 Natalie was named Athlete of the Year by the Canadian Speed Skating Association. She participated in her 1st Olympic Games in Calgary, Alberta in 1988 when speed skating was an Olympic Games demonstration sport.  Four years later, in Albertville, France she would capture gold in the speed skating relay with teammates Sylvie Daigle (1962-   ), Angela Cutrone (1969-   ) and Annie Perreault (1971-   ) and she was given the honor of being Canada’s flag bearer at the Games’ closing ceremonies.  At these Olympic Winter Games she also won 2 silver medals and was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Committee Hall of Fame. She captured world titles in short track speed skating in 1991, 1992, 1993 and 1994. In total she would win 39 world championships distance medals, and some 50 overall international competitions, while establishing world records in several events, including the relay, 500 meters, and 1,000 meters and 1,500 metre events. In 1994 she was named Athlete of the Year by the Mérite Sportif Quebébécois. In 1997 she retired from competition sports. Having been diagnosed with osteoarthritis while still speed skating competitively, she became an Honorary Patron of the Arthritis Society of Quebec. In 2001 she was inducted into the Quebec Sports Hall of Fame and the following year she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. In the 2004 Athens, Greece Olympic Games she worked as Assistant Chef de Mission for the Canadian team. On December 10, 2007 she was named the Chef de Mission at the Vancouver, Canada 2010 Winter Olympic Games providing leadership for the Canadian team of over 300 volunteers and staff that had the goal to ensure that every Canadian athlete could perform to full potential. She was also the official spokesperson for the Canadian Olympic Team. Natalie married Daniel Gaudette, a gym teacher and the couple has two adopted Chinese daughters. Source: Nathalie Lambert, National Speakers Bureau (Accessed September 2015); Olympics Canada (accessed September 2015)
 
Annie Perreault.
 
Born July 29,1971 Windsor, Quebec.  Annie has been a member of the National Short Track Speed Skating Team for more than 12 years. She is one of Canada's most decorated female Olympians with credits of one bronze medal and two gold medals at the 1998 and 1992 Winter Olympic Games. She has also earned four individual gold medals from 1990 through 1997 at the World Championships to accompany her two silver and four bronze World Championship individual medals. She also holds team medals, a gold, two silver and three bronze for World Championships from 1991 through 2002. She had to miss the Lillehammer Olympic Games in 1994 because of a severe concussion she had sustained at the Canadian Olympic trials. Just month prior to the 1998 Nagano Olympic Games he underwent surgery on both legs to relieve a chronic problem with compartment syndrome. At the Nagano Olympic Games in 1998 she became the 1st Canadian woman to win individual Olympic gold in short track speed skating in the 500 meter race. She was the 1998 Quebec Athlete of the year. An accident left her with an 8 inch gash on her left thigh during a race in December 2000 but she returned to competition  qualifying for the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics in 2002 as an alternated in the women's 3000 metre relay. Annie has coached some of her family members who have also become recognized skaters. While she enjoys her sport and wants to maintain her performance level she also aims to have fun with the sport. . 
 
Catherine Priestner-Allinger

née Priestner Born Windsor, Ontario May 27, 1956. She joined the national speed skating team in 1971 and that same year she won gold and silver medals at the Canada Winter Games. She was a member of the 1972 winter Olympic team but it was not until she spent more time in international competitions winning podiums that she would stand on the Olympic podium. In 1976, at the Innsbruck Olympic Games she became the first Canadian woman to win an individual medal with a silver in the 500 metre event. In 1975 she was Calgary’s Athlete of the year and in 1976 she was inducted into the Alberta Hall of Fame and received the Governor General’s Award of Excellence. In 1981 she was inducted into the Canadian Speed Skating Hall of fame. After retiring from competition she established a successful career as an Olympic television commentator with the CBC and CTV. She worked as an organizer for the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics and with the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics.

 

Gladys Robinson
Image result for gladys Robinson speed skatingBorn 1902?, Toronto, Ontario ?Died 1934. Gladys grew up in Toronto enjoying success in the sport of speed skating. It seems as if this was a family sport as her brother Ross (1906-1992)would be a member of the 1928 Canadian Olympic team. At 14 years she was the Canadian Women's Speed skating champion. In 1920 the International Speed Skating Union allowedd women to participate and Gladys place third in this world event at Lake Placid, New York, U.S.A. The following year, 1921, Gladys returned to the world championships in Lake Placid and took the gold medal becoming the 1st North American to win the event.  She repeated this feat again in 1922 and 1923.  In 1924 Gladys image appeared in a series of 56 sports cards issued by the Willard Chocolate Company of Toronto. In 1926 she was featured as # 52 in the Dominion Chocolate sports cards. Gladys retired from competition when she married. Sadly Gladys died at the age of 32.
 
Jean Wilson. Born Glasgow, Scotland July 19, 1910. Died September 3, 1933. In 1931 she was the North American indoor speed skating champion.  At the 1932 Olympics when women’s speed skating was a demonstration sport, Jean won the 500m race in 58 seconds and came second in the 1500 m event.  At only 23 years of age she died from a progressive muscular disease. She was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1955.
 
Sports  Administrators
Roberta "Bobbie" Steen

Born April 9, 1946, North Vancouver, British Columbia. Died  November 12, 1995, Burnaby, British Columbia. A tireless promoter of B.C. and national sporting opportunities for women.  In 1990 she was founding chair and executive director of Promotion Plus, the B.C. organization for girls and women in sport and physical activity. She was chair, Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity and co-chair, British Columbia. Games Society. In 1994, she was named volunteer of the year by the Canadian Sport Council, the first time that the national sport community recognized an individual for increasing opportunities for girls and women. The Bobbie Steen Legacy Foundations presents an annual award to an emerging female leader in British Columbia who demonstrates an interest in gender equality in sports. Coaches BC presents the Bobbie Steen Award of Excellence recognizing an individual who demonstrates exemplary leadership in sport  and serves as an outstanding model. Source: Vancouver Hall of Fame Online (Accessed November 2012)
 

Swimming     back
Gail Amundrud

Born April 6, 1957 Toronto, Ontario. She began competitive swimming at the Ottawa Kingfish Club in 1967. She moved to Vancouver and continued her training with the Dolphin Swimming Club. All the training paid off. She was the first Canadian girl to swim 100meter free style under one minute at the 1973 World Championships. In 1974 at the Commonwealth Games she took two gold, silver and a bronze medal. She continued to swim breaking Canadian records and placing on the podiums in the 1976 Olympics ( Bronze in the 4X100 FS relay), and the Pan Am Games.  Suggest sources: Ferguson, Bob Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Scarborough; Prentice Hall, 1977)pg. 5.
 

Joann Elaine Baker Born November 24, 1960 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. She participated in the Pan-Am Games in 1975 in Mexico  where she warned silver medals in the 200 metre breast stroke, and the  400 metre relay events. She won three gold and two silver medals in her age group in East Berlin, Germany. She represented Canada at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games where she had a sixth place showing. That same year she toured Japan and competed in a Paris, France meet in 1977. In 1977 she was the Manitoba Senior Champion. Source: Who's Who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson.
 
Sara Barber

Born January 25, 1941 Brantford, Ontario. As a teen she was a member of the Canadian International Swim teams from 1954 through 1962.In 1956 she was one of the youngest team members at the Melbourne Australia Olympic Games.  In 1959 she held the world record for the 100 meter back stroke. And won a silver medal at the Pan Am Games. In 1958 and 1969 she represented Canada at the British Empire Games and won silver and bronze medals. She is married to Donald Jenkins and they have three children. In 1964 she attended McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario for her BA and went on to earn her BNE. She is a member of the group of Olympians who were honoured in 2002 on the Brantford walk of Fame. Suggested source: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson.
 

Marilyn Bell Born October 19, 1937 Toronto, Ontario. It was September in 1954 when a 16-year-old Toronto Girl entered the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) sponsored marathon swim race across Lake Ontario. She was the only entrant to actually finish the 32-mile race. It took 21 hours! She was the first to successfully swim Lake Ontario. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She attended university and married and lives in the United States where she was teacher for 20 years . A back injury forced Mrs. Di Lascio to give up swimming a few years ago. She enjoys coming home to Canada for visits as often as she can. The ferry to Toronto Island is named in her honour.
 
Ethel Viola Bieber

née Gilbert. Born May 6, 1920 Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 22, 1988 Winnipeg, Manitoba. . She enjoyed swimming in at ten began a competitive career. At 15 she held the Nation Junior title for her freestyle events and was a member of 5 championship relay teams. All through the 1930’s and into the early 1940’s she would continue to hold provincial and national records in various events. She competed on five championship relay teams, but was best known as a long distance swimmer, winning the Wrigley Mile five times and the Western Canada Mile three times from 1937-1940.  In 1941 she won her last individual National title in the 200 yard freestyle. Unfortunately World War ll prevented any international competitions. She was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.Sources: Obituary, Winnipeg Free Press, 24 October 1988, page 23. Memorable Manitobans. Profile by Kris Keen. Online (Accessed December 2011) ; Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed December 2011.
 

Shirley Marguerite Campbell Born September 21, 1935. Fergus, Ontario. Shirley loved swimming. In 1951 set Canadian record 5:13 seconds for Canadian 400 in North Vancouver. While she qualified for the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games she became ill and could not participate. However in 1952 she won Canadian mile at Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) then she turned professional and took the 1953 and  1954 CNE 3 mile pro swim titles. In 1955 she attempted to beat Marilyn Bell’s Lake Ontario swim record but had to be pulled from the water before she could finish. Shirley married William Richard Campbell and the couple have 2 children. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977. (Posted Feb 2016)
 
Barbara 'Barb' Lynne Clark-Parolin Born September 24, 1958, Coronation, Alberta. When she was just 11 years old she took up swimming and within just two years she competing at the Canadian trials for the 1972 Olympic Games. University of Alberta. She was a strong swimmer in the butterfly stroke. In 1974 and again in 1976 she received the Outstanding Swimmer Award. She 1st represented Canada 1975 at a world swim meet. She earned a bronze 4X100 freestyle relay in the1976 Olympics, Montreal swimming with Becky Smith, Gail Amundrud and Anne Jardin.  Also in 1976 she received a Governor’s General Silver Medal. She retired from competition at the end of 1976.  As a masters-level swimmier she has won 7 gold medals and broken numerous records. She was delighted to help carry the Olympic torch on its route to the Winter Olympics, Vancouver, British Columbia in 2010.  Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977); Sports reference/Olympic sports. Barbara Clark Online Accessed February 2016.
 
Wendy Elizabeth Cook- Hogg née Cook. Born September 15, 1956. At 14 Wendy had earned a position on the national swim team. A swimmer who competed in backstroke and medley relay swimming events in the 1972 Olympic Games, Munich, Germany and won a Bronze Medal in the Relay at the 1976 Olympic Games, Montreal, Canada. She married her coach Don Hogg prior to the 1976 Olympic Games. At the 1973 World Championships she won a Bronze Medal in the 100 metre backstroke. At the 1974 British Commonwealth Games she won two Gold Medals, in the 100 metres backstroke and in the 200 metre event. In the 100 metre backstroke in the relay event she set a world record.In 1974 the Canadian Press voted her the winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year. She retired from competition by the end of the 1970's and graduated with a degree in physical education from the University of Alberta after which she earned a teaching certificate from the University of British Columbia. She worked briefly as a swimming coach and then taught school.  In 1990 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. In 2013 she served as principal of Pinewood Elementary School, Cranbrook, British Columbia.
 
  Angela Coughlan Born October 4, 1952, London, England. Died June 14, 2009 Ottawa, Ontario. Angela was a member of the Canadian swim team from 1967-1972. She 1st competed for Canada at the 1967 Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where she won a silver in the 4x100-metre freestyle relay, and bronze medals in the 200, 400 and 800-metre freestyle.  After her performance at the 1970 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she earned a gold medal in the 100-metre freestyle, silvers in the 200-meter freestyle, 400-metre freestyle, and 4x100-metre freestyle relay, and a bronze in the 4x100-metre medley relay, she was Canada’s Female Athlete of the year winning the Velma Springstead Trophy and was top Canadian female swimmer that same year. At the Games, Cali, Colombia, she earned a gold medal anchoring the 4x100-metre medley relay, and 3 silver medals in the 4 X 100 meter freestyle relay, the 100 meter freestyle and the 200-metre freestyle. On top of her international performances she won 23 Canadian championships and took all Canadian freestyle titles from 1968 through 1971. During this same time she broke one world record and 13 Canadian long-course freestyle records. She was still a teen when she retired from competitive competition in 1972. In 1972 the city of Burlington, her home town named a new high school indoor Pool in her honour. She continued to coach swimming for the next 20 years. She married twice to Toomas Arusoo and then Lynn Sharp and she had 3 children.  She was inducted into the Ontario Aquatic Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Burlington Hall of Fame in 2008. In 1995 she was presented with the Order of Ontario.  Just prior to her death the City of Hamilton, Ontario included her at their annual Celebration of Significant People Concert. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977); Olympic swimming medalist Angela Coughlan dies. June 16, 2009. CBC Sports. Online Accessed February 2016; In Memory: Angela Coughlan, Bronze Medal swimmer Olympic.ca Online accessed February 2016.
 
Michelle Cameron Coulter  Born December 28, 1962, Calgary, Alberta. From 1981through 1988 she was on the synchronized swimming team that would win 6 of 8 national championships. She was a member of the team that demonstrated the new sport to the International Olympic Committee to have the Games accept the sport. She and her partner Carolyn Waldo were the gold medal team in the 1988 Olympics. She is a member of the Alberta sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. As of 2000 she is included in the International Aquatic Sports Hall of Fame. In 1988 she was inducted into the Order of Canada. In 1991 she was the Assistant Chief du Mission for the World Aquatic Gamed in Perth Australia and in 1996 she served as Athlete Services Officer for the Atlanta Olympic Games. She an active volunteer who has served on numerous Boards with Rogers Broadcasting, the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, special Olympics, and the Canadian Olympic Alumni. She began a charitable foundation that was inspired by her children called “A gift of Love” to share and help others and has her own company “Gold Medal Inspiration”. Michelle married Al Cameron and the couple have four children. Source: Alberta Sports Hall of Fame online (Accessed January 2014) ; michellecameroncoulter.ca (Accessed January 2014)
 
Karen Clark Born April 9, 1972 Montreal, Quebec. A few weeks after she was born her family moved to Mississauga, Ontario. At 6 she was a member of the Mississauga Synchronized Swim Club. In 1983, three years after she joined the Olympium organization in Etobicoke, Karen won her first individual provincial title, she became the 10 & Under Ontario champion in all events. Two years further up the road she captured her first national title (junior champion in figures), in the process becoming the youngest synchronized swimmer to ever win a Canadian national title. She repeated the feat three times. In 1989 she became a triple silver medalist at the Junior World Championships. The following year she won a silver in duet at the international Goodwill Games and first in 1991 then in 1994 helped Canada win silver medals in team events at the World Aquatic Championships.She is a member of our Canadian Olympic Synchronized Swim Team. She earned a sliver medal at the Atlanta Olympic Games in 1996. That same year she and Lisa Alexander were chosen c0-winners of Mississauga's Female Athlete of the Year Award. She holds  20 Canadian titles in various categories including figures, solo, duet and team. and has won medals at the Pan American Games and the World Cup. She earned her BA at the University of Calgary and in 1997 she won a Dale Carnegie Achievement Award for excellence in public speaking. After retiring from competition she became a journalist with the Calgary Herald, the Canadian Press and a colour commentator for the CBC Sports.
In 2004 Karen was inducted into the Mississauga Sports Hall of Fame.
Source: Mississauga Sports Hall of Fame. Accessed May 2016
 
Leslie Cliff Born March 11, 1955, Vancouver, British Columbia. Leslie was a strong competitor in the 1970 Commonwealth Games and showed future promise. She studied at the University of British Columbia. In the 1971 Pan-Am Games she won 3 gold 2 silver. 1971 to 1973 British Columbia’s Swimmer of the Year and in 1971 she was British Columbia’s Junior Athlete of the year. In the 1972 Olympic Games, Munich, Germany she won a silver medal in the 400 meter individual medley.  In 1971-2 she was inducted as an Officer in the Order of Canada and in 1972 she was presented with the Beatrice Pines Trophy as Canada’s Outstanding Female Swimmer. In 1974 she won 2 gold medals, one in the 200 meter individual medley and one in the 400 meter individual medley at Commonwealth Games. During her competitive swimming career she received a total of 33 medals! After retiring from competitive sport she co-founded the Zajac annual swim camps organized by the alumni of Canada’s Swim Team. In 1976 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. In 1984 she became a member of the Canada Sports Hall of Fame. In 1989 she founded a financial management firms, Genus Capital Management.  In 1997 she entered the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. Source: Canada Sports Hall of Fame. Online. Accessed February 2016.
 
Robin Marie Corsiglia-Scholefield née Corsiglia. Born August 12, 1962), Kirkland, Quebec. She represented Canada as a 14-year-old at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec. She won a bronze medal swimming the breaststroke leg of the women's 4 x 100 meter medley relay, together with teammates Wendy Hogg (1956-   ), Susan Sloan-Kelsey (1958-   ), and Anne Jardin (1959-   ). Individually, she also competed in the women's 100-metre breaststroke, finishing 4th in the event final. Robin attended the University of Southern California, and swam for the USC Trojans swimming and diving team. In 1999 she received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles. Robin is married and has 3 children.  Sources: Bob Ferguson,  Who’s who in Canadian Sport , (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977)
 
Sheilagh Croxon

 

Synchronized Swimming

Sheilagh studied with an apprenticeship with noted synchronized swim coach Debbie Muir, Canada’s 1st national coach to learn technical strategies and strategies. She built the Olympium Synchronized Swim Club in Etobicoke, Ontario. In 1975 she earned the Suzanne Eon Trophy as the most promising coach in Synchro. By 1986 and again in 1988 she had earned the Coaching Excellence Award from the Coaching Association of Canada. In 1989 she was declared the Alberta Female Amateur Coach of the Decade. In 1996 she was team assistant coach at the Atlanta, U.S.A. Olympic Games where the team took a silver medal. . In 1998 she was appointed as head coach for Synchro Canada taking teams to podium positions at world events. She was both coach and choreographer for the Canadian Synchro team at the 2000 Sydney, Australia Olympic Games where Canada took a Bronze medal. She took some time from coaching when she had her 3rd child but soon returned to her love of coaching .In 2008 she coached the New Zealand Synchro Pairs at the Olympic Games.  Sheilagh hopes that if women can show leadership in sports by coaching that women’s leadership in other arenas will soon follow. Sheilagh is a consultant with the Coaching Association of Canada’s Women in Coaching program and volunteers as chair of the Coaches Association of Ontario. In 2010, Sheilagh was nominated by the Canadian Olympic Committee for the IOC Woman and Sport trophy for the Americas and also was awarded the prestigious Rolf Lund Jule Nisse Award by the province of Ontario for playground to podium contribution as a volunteer for the province of Ontario Source: Herstory; The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2010; Debbie Muir, Canada’s Sport Hall of Fame. Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Phyllis Dewar-Lowrey Born March 5, 1916 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Died April 8, 1961 Toronto, Ontario. As a young swimmer she earned the nickname “Moose Jaw Mermaid. In 1934 & 1935 she held every single Canadian freestyle swimming record from 100 yards to one mile! She set records and won a 4 gold medals at the 1934 British Empire Games in London, England. That same year she won the Velma Springstead Trophy as Canadian female athlete of the year,. She returned to the British Empire Games in Australia 1938 for another gold medal in the 4 X 110 yard freestyle relay.  She married Murray Lowery and the couple have 4 children.  In 1967 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and in 1971 she was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame followed in 1972 with a membership in the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame.  Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977; Phyllis Dewar (1916-1961), The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan, Online, Accessed March 2016)
 
Sylvia Elizabeth Dockerill Born September 17, 1951 Vancouver, British Columbia. Sylvia attended the University of British Columbia and earned a degree in home economics and then went on to earn a teacher’s certificate. She became a member of the Canada national swim team 1969 and swam with them until 72. She has competed in local, national and World competition including the 1971 Pan Am Games where she earned a gold medal in the 100 meter breast stroke. She also competed in the Munich Olympics, 1972. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Suzanne Eon

Synchronized Swimming
Born February 19, 1924, Montreal, Quebec.  Died January 23, 1994. After high school she attended Bart’s Business College. She became the director of synchronized swimming Quebec YWCA and began coaching the sport in 1950. Her students would win 104 national titles. She coached teams in 4 Pan Am Games and numerous international events. In 1967 she was awarded a Confederation Medal. In 1975 she won the Dick Ellis Trophy, and was Quebec City’s coach of the year. In 1976 she was inducted into the Order of Canada. The Suzanne Eon Award is presented by Synchro Canada to promising coaches.   
 
Sylvie Fortier. Born July 3,1958 Quebec City, Quebec. Between 1973 and 1976 Sylvie won 24 national level individual and team synchronized swimming gold medal! She also holds 7 medals from the 1975 & 1976 Pan American and Pan Pacific Games and won the world championship title in 1976.She won international competitions in the United States, Scandinavia, and Japan. She has been named synchronized swimming's champion of the world. She has also been named Quebec's Athelete of the Year and received the Elaine Tanner Trophy as Canada's Junior Woman Athelete of the year.  In 1977, the year she retired from competition,  she was inducted as a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.Sylvie has also been inducted into the Aquatics Hall of Fame and is honorary president of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada  Synchro Canada offers an annual Sylvie Fortier Award for the best membership growth percentage in the sport. In 2007 Sylvie earned her Master's degree from the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University, Newfoundland.
 
Sylvie Frechette Born June 27, 1967 Montreal, Quebec.Swimming has always been her passion. She was Female Athlete of the Year in Aquatic Sports in 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992. She earned this distinction by winning Olympic medals, in Atlanta in 1996 a Silver, Olympic Gold in Barcelona in 1992, German Open Champion 1992, Japan Open Champion 1992, World Aquatic Champion 1991 where she was not only first but also set a world record. The list continues with medals won at the Fina World Cup 1991,and the the 1990 Commonwealth Games. In 1992 the Canadian Sports Federation created the Sylvie Frechette Award in her honour. Today she follows her sport closely while working as a professional in communications and marketing in the Montreal area.
 
Nancy Ellen Garapick.  Born September 24, 1961, Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Nancy began swimming when she was 7 years old. A swimmer who did well in butterfly, free style and individual medley events she had the most success in the backstroke event.  She set the world record on April 27, 1975 in the 200 meter backstroke and in the same year was named Canada’s Female Athlete of the Year.  She was just 14 years old! In the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal she won two bronze medals and set a new Olympic record for 100 meter backstroke. In 1978 she won bronze in the 4X100 meter freestyle relay at the 1978 World Championships with Gail Amundrud, Wendy Quirk and Susan Sloan. The following year at the Pan American Games, she brought  home 5 medals: silver in the 200 meter individual medley and the 4x100 meter freestyle relay with Gail Amundrud, Cheryl Gibson, and Anne Gagnon and bronze in the 100 and 200 metre butterfly and the 400 metre individual medley.  In 1980 she gained a spot on the Canadian swim team for the 1980 Olympics which were held in Moscow, U.S.S.R. and boycotted by Canada. She attended the University of Southern California and spent several years on their swim team. In 1983 she retired from competitive swimming after having won 17 Canadian national titles. She ten began a career as a teacher in the Yukon.  Nancy became a member of the Nova Scotia Sports Hall of Fame in 1986 and in 2000 she was selected as Nova Scotia's Top Female Athlete of the Past 100 Years. In 2008 she was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. Sources: Canadian Encyclopedias Online (accessed 2009); Nancy Garapick, Sports Reference Olympic Sports. Online (accessed 2010)
 
Cheryl Ann Gibson-Brokop née Gibson. Born July 28, 1959, Edmonton, Alberta. She joined the national swim team in 1974. At the 1975 Pan Am Games she won silver in the 200 m butterfly, the 400m individual medley, and a bronze 200 m backstroke. In 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal she won a silver medal in the women’s 400 meter individual medley. . She would win at Canadian Nationals and set a Canadian record in backstroke. She held the Alberta provincial record in the 400 meter individual medley for 300 years when it was broken in December 2008. She also showed well at some international events. In 1976 she received a Governor’s General Silver Medal. In 1978 Commonwealth Games she won the 200 meter backstroke and took bronze in the 100 meter and 400 meter individual medley. She followed up that year with tow bronze medals at the World Championships. At the 1979 Pan Am Games she won 3 silver medals.  She retired from competition in 1982 after the Commonwealth Games where she earned a gold as silver and bronze medal. At the time of her retirement she had earned 34 national titles! That same year she graduated from Arizona State University in the U.S. and became a chartered accountant in 1986 before earning a law degree from the University of Toronto in 1989. She was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in 1986, the Edmonton Sports Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Arizona University Sports Hall of Fame in 1986. In  2001 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Sport Hall of Fame followed in 2005 with induction into Swim British Columbia Sport Hall of Fame and in 2010 the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. She took an interest in sports administration and in September 2015 she was appointed head of Swimming Canada’s Board of Directors. Source: Sports Reference/ Olympic Sports. Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Audrey Mildred Griffin-Kieran née Griffin. Born June 16, 1902 Burgess Hill, Sussex, England. Audrey held the Canadian Pacific Northwest titles in long distance swimming, often beating male contenders and British Columbia’s women’s championships. From 1915-1929 she would win 13 events as well as 27 wins at the Pacific Northwest Championships. She won the mixed 3 mile Victoria swim 9 times. She won the Dominion Championship 5 times and placed 2nd 3 times. She married John Russell Kieran. Audrey is a member of the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame and she was inducted into the Greater Victoria (British Columbia) Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.  Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Donna-Marie Gurr Born February 18, 1955, Vancouver, British Columbia. In 1969 she was diagnosed with a joint disorder in her left leg. Forced to train wearing a fiberglass cast she worked with crutches. But she did not let this keep her down as she made the trials and won 3 medals at the Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland.  In 1971 Pan Am Games in Cali, Columbia she won a gold in the 4 X 100 medley relay, a gold in the 200 meter backstroke and a 3rd gold in the 100 meter backstroke. Prior to the 1972 Olympic Games, Munich, Germany she experienced spinal problems and tendonitis in both shoulders and yet she won a bronze medal in the 200 meter backstroke. She is a member of the Order of Canada. She is also a member of the Circle of excellence at Swimming Canada having been inducted on April 5, 2013.  Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Cheryl Lynn Hayes Born December 18, 1958, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Cheryl was born deaf but she never let it hold her back. She began winning swim meets when she was just a teen of 14 and she began formal competitive swimming in 1969. She was a member of the Kinsmen Gold fins Swim Club. In 1973 she won a silver medal in the butterfly, and a bronze medal in the individual medley at the 12th Games for the Deaf, Malmo, Sweden. At the 1st Pan-Am Games for the Deaf in MARACAIBO, Venezuela in 1975 she won 4 gold medals and a silver. In 1976 she was the Saskatoon GOLDFIN swim Club most Valuable Swimmer of the Year. She participated in the Bucharest Deaflympics in 1977winning a Silver in the 400 meter Individual Medley, and the 4 X 100 medley. She also took a Bronze in the 200 meter breastroke, and the 4 X 100 meter medley relay. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Allison Ann Higson-Cavanaugh. Born March 13, 1973 Mississauga, Ontario. Allison holds the World Age-Record for 11-12 year olds in the 100 Metre breastroke and holds nation records in the 100 and 200 Metre breaststrokes and in the 200 and 400 Metre individual medley for the same age group. In 1985 this  breaststroke swimmer set 11 records at a single swim meet! That same year she became the youngest medalist in the world when she won a bronze medal for the 200 m breaststroke event. In 1986 the Canadian Amateur Swimming Association awarded her top Female Athlete of the year. in both Junior and Senior Divisions for 1986. At the 1990 Commonwealth Games in Auckland, New Zealand she won a silver medal in the 4 X 100 metre free relay and placed 4th in the 100 metre free relay. Her las competition was in the 1992 Barcelona, Spain Olympic Games. She received a scholarship to Stanford University, Stanford, California, U.S.A. where she earned all-American honours as well as 4 NCAA championships. (2018)
 
Wendy Elizabeth Hogg née Cook Born September 15, 1956 Vancouver, British Columbia. As a youngster she failed her beginners swimming test twice. However she went on to break swim records by the time she was 10 and became a member of the National Swim Team at 14. In 1972 she was ranked 2nd overall in the world for the 100 meter backstroke.  In 1973 she participated in the World Championships in Belgrade Yugoslavia placing 3rd in the 100 meters and was the British Columbia Junior Athlete of the Year. In 1974, a17-year-old Wendy set a world record in the 100m backstroke that marked the first leg of the women’s 4x100m medley relay at the 1974 British Commonwealth Games in Christchurch, New Zealand. She also won the women’s 100 meter backstroke events at these Games. She won several major swim meets including the National Amateur Athletic Union Championships in the U.S.A. and the British Championships. In 1974 she was Canadian Female Athlete of the Year. She competed in backstroke and relay events at the 1976 Summer Olympics, winning a bronze medal in the 4 x 100 meters medley relay with teammates, Robin Corsiglia (1962-   ), Susan Sloan-Kelsey (1958-   ) and Anne Jardin (1959-   ) and that same year was awarded Governor’s General Silver Medal in sports. She also competed in backstroke and freestyle events at the 1972 Summer Olympics. Wendy graduated from the University of British Columbia and is married to Douglas Hogg. She is a member of the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977); Winners: Wendy Cook Swimming. Greatest Sporting Moments. Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Helen Hunt née Stewart. Born December 28, 1938, Vancouver, British Columbia. Helen married Ted Hunt and the couple have one child. She won a silver medal in the 1954 Commonwealth Games in 4 X 100 medley relay, and the following year at the Pan Am Games she earned a gold medal in the 100 meter freestyle event. In the 1956 she participated in the Olympic Games in Melbourne Australia. At the 1959 Pan Am Games she won silver in the 4 X 100 freestyle relay.  She was awarded the Beatrice Pines Trophy as Canada’s Outstanding Female Swimmer for 3 years, 1955-57 and British Columbia Athlete of the year for 1955.  Becoming interested in the sport of volleyball she joined the Canadian National women’s team and the British Columbia provincial team. She became a member of the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame in 1968. Source: British Columbia Sport Hall of Fame Accessed March 2016
 
Anne Elizabeth Jardin-Alexander née Jardin. Born July 26 1959 Montreal, Quebec. Anne won a gold medal at the 1974 Commonwealth Games in the 400 meter freestyle relay. The next year she won bronze at the 1975 World Championships in the 400 meter freestyle relay and at the 1975 Pan Am Games she won a bronze medal in the 200 meter freestyle and a silver in the 400 meter relay. She won a bronze medal in the women's 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay, alongside her Canadian teammates Becky Smith (1959-   ), Barbara Clark (1958-   ) and Gail Amundrud (1957-   ). She also won bronze in the 4 x 100 meter medley relay, with Wendy Cook, Robin Corsiglia (1962-   ) and Susan Sloan.  In 1977, 1979 and 1981 she was named a University All-American. At the 1979 Pan Am Games she to a silver and bronze medal. In 1980 she set a world short course record and qualified for the 1980 Olympic Team to Moscow but Canada boycotted the Games. Anne attended the University of Houston, Texas on a full scholarship and graduated in 1982. She retired from Competitive swimming in 1983 and worked with Swim Canada until 1988. Anne has been inducted into the Quebec Swimming Hall of Fame and the Quebec Sports Hall of Fame and is included in the Canada Swim Circle of Excellence. . She is married to Thomas Alexander and the couple have 3 children. Anne works as a Physical Education teacher in Ottawa, Ontario. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977); Swimming Canada, Circle of Excellence Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Kasia Kuleza

Synchronized Swimming

Born August 29, 1976 Warsaw, Poland. Kasia immigrated to Canada with her family when she was just seven years old. She studied Sociology at Vanier College, Montreal, Quebec. In 1993 she won the Helen Vanderburg Award for the best overall 15-17 age group synchro simmer. At he 1996 Summer Olympic Games, Atlanta, U.S.A. she earned a silver medal with the synchronized swimming team. At the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Kula Lumpur she received a gold medal in synchronized duet with Jacinthe Taillon. She is a coach and technical director at Quebec Excellence Synchro. (2018)
 
Maria Beverly Lay Born November 26, 1948 Vancouver, British Columbia. She studied at California State Polytechnic College and earned her Masters degree from California State University in the U.S.A. From 1964-1968 she held the Canadian 100 m freestyle swimming record. She represented Canada at the Olympics in Tokyo in 1964. In 1966 she set a world record in the 4 X 110 Freestyle relay. She earned a Silver medal at the Pan Am Games in Winnipeg in 1967. In the next year she earned a bronze in the 4 X 100 meter Freestyle swim relay. In the early 1970’s she coached swimming at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario and worked as a colour commentator with the CBC. In 1972 she relocated to Ottawa and was coach for the Kingfish Swim Club. From 1971 through 1975 she served as Director for Study of Sport in Society and was acting manager of Technical Programs for Sport Canada.
 
Marianne Limpert Born October 10, 1972 Matagme, Quebec. This swimmer has won 20 national titles and 81 international medals including Olympic silver. Marianne considers medal just symbols of her journey through life. She has been Swim Canada's top female athlete of the year in 1996, 1997 and 2000. At a qualifying event in 2000 she gave her place on the Olympic event to the young swimmer who placed 1/100 of a second behind her! A Maple Leaf tattoo just above her right ankle lets people know she is Canadian. Out of the pool she is a spokeswoman for the New Brunswick Arthritis Association and she has traveled with the "Future is Female" program that encourages girls to pursue their dreams.
 
Kim Lumsdon


Marathon swimmer
Born February 3, 1957 Toronto. Ontario. At just two her famous swim coach Cliff Lumsdon (1931-1991) had Kim learning to swim. She entered she 1st swimming competition when she was nine. In 1973 she was swimming in long distance (three miles) at the nationals. The following year she was competing at the Rio de la Plate, Argentina five mile swim. By 1975 she became the second woman and fifth person overall at the Lac St Jean fire-mile swim. In 1975 the cold waters of Lake Ontario defeated her cross lake swim but in 1976 she became the 11th person to swim 32 miles across Lake Ontario. She was considered the fourth best women's marathon swimmer in the world and she earned the Gus Ryder Award from the Borough of Etobicoke in Ontario. Kim married and has three children. She is the owner of the Kim Lumsdon Swim Club in the Toronto. As an adult Kim has many achievements as a Masters swimmer as well. She has been ranked in the Top 10 in the 800m and 1,500m free events respectively when she was in the 40 to 45 age group. Although Kim likes swimming at Masters Meets, she has a greater preference to swim longer swims, as well as open water events. In 2016 she was swimming across Lake Erie as training for a planned swim across Lake Ontario hoping in 2020 to be come the oldest woman to complete this swim.
 
Flora Miller

Born January 9, 1931 Hamilton, Ontario. Flora started swimming at an early age in the local Jimmy Thompson pool. Even though she was an undersized youth she became a member of the Aquatic club and was  coached by Jimmy Thompson.  In local press articles she was often referred to as Mighty Mite or Mighty Mouse. In August 1947 she was a member of  Jimmy Thompson’s Hamilton Aquatic Club Swim Team attending the Canadian Swimming championships in Vancouver, British Columbia. Flora won gold in the Backstroke event. Upon her arrival back home the kids in her neighborhood threw a street parade for Flora. A few says after her return Icon Flora Henderson gave the young medal winner the key to the City of Hamilton in a ceremony on the steps at city hall. Flora married a former swim team colleague who was a club diver. In 1967 the couple moved for a new job with Stanley Steel in LaSalle , Quebec.  Swimming was just not a part of the passions of her children However Flora has hopes that a new great granddaughter , who loves swimming, may just take up the passion of the sport. Source: Ron Mackie oldguin86@yahoo.com
 

Debbie Muir


Synchronized Swimming
Born July 12, 1953, Calgary, Alberta. Although she was trained as a school teacher she needed more. In 1973 she was a member of the team that captured Canada’s 1st synchro silver medal at the inaugural world aquatic championships. She began coaching with the Calgary Aquabelles team to help pay life expenses but soon was in love with coaching. She became her club’s head coach and in 1976 national coach. In 1979 she gave up being a school teacher when federal funding was available to pay coaches. She began coaching teams for international events in 1978 and when Synchro Canada formed in 1981 she was national coach for over 7 years. In 1994 she entered the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. In 1995 she was inducted as a builder into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and in 1998, again as a builder, to the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. She became Australia’s full time national coach helping establish a strong foundation in the sport. After the Sydney Olympics she turned her coaching skills toward senior managers and created a program to get world-class performances from employees. She has co-authored in 2007 The Great Traits: Fundamentals for Achievers, Leaders, and Legacy leavers.  On May 22, 2007 she was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame. Source: Sheila Robertson, Groundbreaker: Debbie Muir accorded her sport’s highest international honour. Coach.ca Accessed March 2016.
 
Vicki Keith Munro. Born February 26, 1961 Winnipeg, Manitoba. A superb marathon swimmer, she would use the butterfly stroke to swim into the record books both nationally and internationally and all for the benefit of charity. In 1985 she swam her first world-record crossing of Lake Ontario. In 1988 she became the first person to swim cross all five Great Lakes. She also conquered the harbour in Sydney, Australia, the English Channel between Europe and England, and Juan de Fuca Strait on the North American west coast and Lake Winnipeg in the geographical heart of Canada. He sponsorships would earn hundreds of thousands of dollars most of which went to Variety Village to benefit disabled children. She was named a Member of the Order of Canada in 1992, earned the Variety Club Heart Award in 1989, B’Nai Brith Woman of the Year for 1989 and the Vanier Award in 1989 and was inducted into the Terry Fox Hall of Fame. Although she officially retired in 1991 from long distance swimming, she hit the waters of the lakes again in 2005 to raise awareness and funds for children with disabilities.
 
Cynthia Cindy Nicholas. Born August 20, 1957 Toronto, Ontario. Died May 19, 2016, Scarborough, Ontario.  At 16 years old Cindy bettered the record for swimming Lake Ontario. In 1975 she swam the English Channel in record-breaking time. In 1977 she became the 1st woman to complete a double crossing of the English Channel  She would go on to swim the Channel 18 more times including 5 two-way trips! Her honorary title was Queen of the Channel. In 1977 she was voted by the Canadian Press as winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Tope Female Athlete of the Year. She received the Order of Canada in 1979. She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. She was inducted into the Ontario Sport Legends Hall of Fame in 2003.
 
Penelope 'Penny'  Oleksiak Born June 13, 2000. Penny as a youth took lessons in gymnastics and competative dance and learned to swim at a neighbour's pool. She was coached at the Toronto Olympian Swim Team. While swimming at the University of Toronto she she gained the attention of the Canadian Olympic Swim team. In 2014 she won 10 individual medals in competitions. She fractured her elbow in a cycling accident in 2015 and within six weeks  she was sinning six medals at the 2015 FINA World Junior Swimming Championships. At the trials for the Summer Olympic Games she set the Junior World Record for the 100 metre freestyle event. Penny also set the Canadian and World Junior records in the 100 m butterfly event. She competed in the Rio de Janeiro Olympic games in five races and became the 1st Canadian to win four medals in the same summer Games and the country's youngest Olympic Champion. a gold in the 100 m freestyle, a silver in the 100 m butterfly, and two bronzes in the women's freestyle relays (4×100 m and 4×200 m). She was the 1st athlete born in the 2000's to claim an Olympic Gold Medal in an individual event. in 2016 she was voted by the Canadian Press as winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Tope Female Athlete of the Year as well as winner of the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's Top Overall Athlete of the year. Despite having injuries in 2017 she managed to place fourth in her races at the World Championships and took two Bronze Medals in the mixed relays. At the 2017 World Junior Swimming Championships she won firve gold medals in relay events breaking the Junior World Record and Championship record in four of the relays. At th 2018 Commonwealth Games she won three Silver Medals in relay events.
 
Anne Ottenbrite. Born May 12, 1966.  She was the first Canadian woman to win an Olympic gold medal in swimming. She won the medal in 1984 in the 200m-breastroke event. At the same games she won sliver in the 100m breaststroke and played a key role in the 400m-medley relay team that won bronze.  She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Ann Louise Caspell Schulman née Caspell. Born July 19, 1941, Kindersley, Saskatchewan. Died April, 23, 2003. In 1965 she graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with a Bachelor of Nursing Sciences (BSN). She worked as an oncology nurse not only serving child patients but also spending time serving the families as well. In 1987 she became an executive member of the Saskatchewan Institute for Prevention of Handicaps. 1988 she established Camp Circle of Friends for kids who lives were touched with cancer. She was motivated to take the job after her son suffered head injuries in an automobile accident. She also worked for programs for car safety restraints, shaken baby syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. She helped to establish a network of adolescent wellness centres located throughout her home province. As a volunteer her avocation was administration work for various swimming associations. From 1970 through 1983 she held various administrative positions at the Saskatoon Goldfin Swim Club and from 1983 to 1986 with the Saskatoon Laser Swim Club. In 1979 she bring the Western Canada Summer Games to her home town. She was a member of the executive of Swim Saskatchewan and worked with Jeux Games Canada. In 1993 she earned the SaskSport Inc. Volunteer Recognition Award which was followed in 1994 with the President’s Award from Participation Canada. In 1996 she was given the National President’s Award from Swimming Canada. She managed swim teams for events from local, provincial, national and the Olympic  Games. In 2001 she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and in 2002 she received the Order of Canada. Source: Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2008, Saskatoon Women’s Calendar  Collective (Coteau Books, 2007) p; The encyclopedia of Saskatchewan Online (Accessed January 2014) Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed January 2014)
 
Susan Sloan-Kelsey née Sloan.Born April 5, 1958 Stettler, Alberta.  Susan relocated to Vancouver, British Columbia to train for the upcoming Olympic Games. Sloan won a bronze medal at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, by swimming the butterfly leg for the third-place Canadian team in the women's 4x100-metre medley relay,  with teammates Wendy Hogg (1956-    ), Robin Corsiglia (1962-   ), and Anne Jardin (1959-   ). After the Olympic Games she attended Arizona State University on full scholarship and was 4 time All American and the 1977 AIAW 100 Butterfly Champion. She won a gold medal at the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta and at the 1978 FINA World Aquatic Championships in Berlin, Germany she and her Canadian teammates won a bronze medal in the 4x100-metre freestyle relay. Since Canada boycotted the 1980 Olympic Games there were no participants. In 2000 she was named to the Clearview Wall of Fame, the Arizona State University Sports Hall of Fame in 2004 and the British Columbia Swimming Hall of Fame and the Swim Alberta Hall of Fame in 2011. In 2014 she was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. Source: Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Rebecca 'Becky' Gwendolyn Smith-Wiber née Smith. Born June 3, 1959, Edmonton, Alberta. Becky was born into a family of swimmers and she took to the water at 4 when her parents were coaches for swimming but could not afford a babysitter. Becky joined the Canadian national swim team 1973 and in 1974 at the Commonwealth Games, Christchurch, New Zealand, she won a gold medal in the 4 X 100 meter freestyle relay, a sliver in the 200 individual medley and another silver in the 400 meter individual medley and was Edmonton’s Amateur Athlete of the Year.   At the 1975 World championships in Cali, she won a bronze medal in the 4 X 100 meter freestyle relay.  In the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal, she earned a bronze medal in women’s 400 meter individual medley and another bronze in the women’s 4 X 100 meter freestyle Relay with Gail Amundrud (1957-   ), Barbara Clark-Parolin (1958-   ) and Anne Jardin (1959-   ). That same year she was awarded a Governor’s General silver medal. At the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta, she won a silver medal in the 400 individual Medley and a bronze medal in the 200 meter individual medley. Becky attended university and then teacher’s college and teaches elementary school in Alberta. Becky married a fellow teacher Bruce Wiber and the couple have one son.  She has been inducted into Canada’s Swimming Circle of Excellence.  Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977); Swimming Canada, Circle of Excellence Online Accessed March 2016.
 
Mary Beth Pauline Stewart-McIlwaine

née Stewart. Born December 8, 1945 Vancouver, British Columbia. Swimming was enjoyed by both Mary and her sister Helen. In 1956 when the Dolphin Swim Club was established in Vancouver what would be more natural for the sisters but to join in the swim of things. Freestyle swimming was Mary’s choice and the butterfly was her strength. At the 1959 Pan Am Games she won a sliver medal in the 4 X 100 freestyle relay. Her sister Helen was also a member of this team.  August 12, 1961 she broke the world record in women’s 100 m butterfly and would hold a second world record from July 28 1962 through to August 16, 1963. Before she was 17 she would claim every Canadian freestyle and Butterfly Record in all distances up to 220 yards showing that she deserved the 1961 and 1962  Bobbi Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Tope Female Athlete of the Year. She followed this up with a gold medal (100 yd butterfly), 2 silver medals and a Bronze Medal in the British Empire/Commonwealth Games and 4 Silver Medals in the 1963 Pan Am Games. She was also a member of the Canadian Olympic Swim team in Tokyo, 1964. Mary was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame in 1966. Mary retired from teaching with the Vancouver School Board in 2006.
 

Irene Marie Strong-Watler Born March 3, 1929 British Columbia. In 1946 she earned the Women's Amateur Athletic Federation of Canada's prestigious Rose Bowl Trophy for setting 12 Canad1an swim records. Irene competed in swimming in the women's 100 metres freestyle event, the women's 4 X 100 metres freestyle relay event and the women's 200 metres breaststroke swim. In 1947 and again in 1949 she was awarded the Sir Edward Beatty Trophy as Canada's most outstanding swimmer.  She represented Canada at the 1948 Olympic Games, London, England. In 1949 the Canadian Press voter her the winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award winner as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year the year she held 19 national swim records. This was the year she retired from competition. She also participated in the 1950 British Empire Games and the 1952 Olympic Games, Helsinki, Finland. She married real estate developer Robert Selkirk Watler (1934-1989).
 
Elizabeth "Betty" Edwards Tancock Born February 22, 1911. Died Toronto May 28, 2009. Her avocation was swimming. She graduated from the University of Toronto in 1933 and was inducted in the University Sports Hall of Fame in 1990. She was a silver medal winner in the 1930 British Empire Games. In 1932 she competed in the Los Angeles Summer games. She was part of the 4X100 freestyle relay that took fourth place.  She also competed in the 1934 British Empire Games. She would also set Canadian records for the 1,000 yards and one mile events.  She also served as President of the University of Toronto Women’s Swim Club. After her Olympic career she worked as an administrator at York University of Toronto.  In 2005, she was introduced to the Ontario Chapter of Olympians as Canada's oldest living Olympian. Source: Toronto Star.
 
Elaine Tanner- Watt Born  February 22, 1951 Vancouver, British Columbia.  When she was 6 her family moved to California where she took naturally to swimming. Back in Vancouver she joined the Dolphin Swimming Club. Standing 4’9” She became known as  “Mighty Mouse” for her swimming prowess, versatility and speed. At 15 years of age she was Canada’s outstanding athlete of the year, the youngest person to ever receive the Lou Marsh Trophy.   She holds 4 gold medals from Commonwealth Games 1966, plus 3 silvers and broke 2 world records!  She was the 1st Canadian Woman to ever win 4 gold. In 1967 she won 2 gold and 3 silver medals in the Winnipeg  Pan-American Games and broke 2 more world records. At the Mexico Olympic games in 1968 she provided Canada with 2 individual silver medals and a relay bronze medal. She is the 1st person ever to win 3 medals in a single Olympic Games and the 1st Canadian female swimmer to win a medal. . However all Canada asked “Why did you not win gold?”. The weight of not winning gold for Canada was the beginning of a downslide in life. At just 18 she retired from competition.    In 1969 she received the Order of Canada and in 1971 she was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. In her personal life she would marry and have two children only to find herself divorced and distanced from her family. Suffering from anorexia and depression she felt that they would be better off without her.  She worked at bringing herself out of this dark period of her life in the late 1980’s earning a diploma in kinesiology from Simon Fraser University in 1986. However it was not until she met John Watt in 1988 that she was able to gain stable ground. The couple now have a classic car business. Elaine has also counseled youth to not make excessive expectations of themselves. She has also done some writing which she has published on her website. She wants her story to be a help and encouragement to others. She and John also work advocating water safety and drowning prevention in Ontario. In 2010 the Canadian Sport Advisory Council voted Elaine into the Top 50 greatest Canadian Athletes of all time.   Sources: The Canadian Encyclopedia. - online.  Information provided by Thomas Brandenberg.: aquestbeyondgold.ca The Elaine Tanner-Watt website (Accessed January 2013)
 
Helen Vanderburg Born Calgary, Alberta  January 12,1959.  A synchronized swimmer who won the 1973 Canadian Junior Championship. By 1977 she placed first  at the Pan Pacific Games and swept the Canadian championships with 6 gold medals.  In 1978 she became  the first Canadian to win the world championship with gold medals in the  solo and duet events.  In 1979 she defeated 90 competitors to win the solo title at the world aquatic championships.  She was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
 
Carolyn Jane Waldo-Baltzer.

Synchronized swimming

Born December 11 1964 Montreal, Quebec. After nearly drowning at the age of 3 years she took 7 years to overcome her fear of the water. In the 1984 Olympics she captured a silver medal in synchronized swimming! At the World Aquatic Championships she and partner Michelle Cameron won gold and Carolyn also took gold in the solo event.  In the 1988 Olympics she won gold in solo and again with Michelle won gold in duet.  She became the 1st Canadian woman to win 2 gold medals at one Olympics. In 1989 she married Thomas Michael Baltzer. Also in 1989 she was invested as an officer of the order of Canada. She currently perusing a career in sports broadcasting. She has also served as spokesperson for the R.C.M.P. National Drug Awareness Campaign. She has also received the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal.
 
Elizabeth 'Beth' Whittall Born May 26, 1936 Montreal, Quebec. . Died May 1, 2015. At 17 Beth won a Silver Medal at the British Empire Games in 1954 in the 4 X 110 yard freestyle relay. A student at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.A. in 1955 she won two Gold Medals at the Pan American Games in Mexico City, Mexico. She won the 100-metre butterfly and the 400 metre freestyle events and was a member of the 4 X 400 metre medley relay team that won Silver. That year she was awarded by the Canadian Press the Lou March Trophy as Canada's Overall Top Athlete and she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. 1955 was also the year she held five Canadian swimming records including the 110-yard butterfly and the one mile swim. After the 1956 Olympic Games, Victoria & Melbourne, Australia Beth retired from swimming competition. After her retirement she  coached swimming in Montreal and started the St Laurent Masters Club. She also sat on the Quebec Masters committee. Relocating to Ontario she founded the Georgian Bay Masters in 1997. She was a writer for and published Wavelengths, a quarterly magazine for Masters swimmers. In 2008 she earned the Hud Stewart Award for her contributions to Masters Swimming. In 1987, at the age of 50, she set a Canadian record in the 200-metre freestyle for competitors in the 50-to-54 age group. In 2015 she was inducted posthumously into the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame in the Legendary Class..
 
Rhoda Isabella Wurtele-Eves Born Montreal, Quebec January 21, 1922.. As a young girl she and her twin sister Rhona enjoyed competitive swimming winning both provincial and national swimming titles in the 50 and 100 yard freestyle events. With her twin sister Rhoda,  she won the Canadian Female Athlete of the year in 1944. She loved competitive skiing and while her promising sports career was interrupted by World War ll she earned placement in the winners circle in North American events prior to being  a member of the 1948 and 1952 Canadian Olympic ski teams.
 
Rhona Wurtele-Gillis Born Montreal, Quebec January 21, 1922. She attended both, Sir George Williams University, Montreal, and the University of Oregon for her education. As a youth she excelled in competitive swimming winning both Quebec provincial and Canadian National swimming titles in the 50 and 100yard freestyle events. With her twin sister Rhoda,  she won the Canadian Female Athlete of the year in 1944. BY 1950 she was earning US National titles in skiing in slalom, downhill and giant slalom events. She was a member of the 1948 Canadian ski team for the Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. By 1973 she was showing her abilities as a member of the Quebec Ladies Interprovincial golf team. In 1982 she was inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame.
 
Swimming  - para swimming  
Stephanie Dixon

Born February 10, 1984, Brampton, Ontario. Stephanie was born without a right leg and hip. This however has never stopped her from being encouraged to participate in life. At two she was swimming. At 5 she was riding a bike. She enjoyed all sports from horseback riding, skiing, diving and gymnastics but swimming was her passion. At 13 she came 1st at a swim meet and at 16 she performed in the Paralympics in Sydney Australia where she earned 5 gold medals, a record for the most gold medals won by a Canadaian at single games. In 2004 she was at the Paralympics Games in Athens bringing Canada a gold, six silver and a bronze medal.  She would also set a new World record in  100 m backstroke.2007 at the ParaPan-Am games she would earn 7 gold medals.  In 2008 and the Paralympics Games, Beijing, China when broke her own backstroke world record and brought Canada a gold, a silver and a bronze medal. Retiring from competitive international sport she completed her BA (psychology) at the University of Victoria and took some time for travel. While visiting in the Yukon Territories a swim coach job was advertised and as of 2015 she was still a swim coach for the Yukon territories. Source: Lisa Wajna, Great Canadian Women: Nineteen Portraits of Extraordinary Women. (Folklore Publishing, 2005)
 

Taekwondo     back
Roxanne Forget A 5-Dan Black belt in taekwondo, Roxanne won the gold medal at the Pan American Games in 1990. In 2001 she was considered the underdog in the competition but came through to win the gold medal at the World Cup held in Vietnam.
 
Table Tennis    
Mariann Domonkos Born February 12, 1958 Budapest, Hungary. Mariann moved to live in Ottawa when she was a youth and it was here that she developed her table tennis skills.  4 times Canadian junior girls’ table tennis champion. In 1973 she won the Canadian Open Table Tennis women’s singles title. She as also won the North American Junior girls title and the North American women’s doubles championship in 1972. 1977 she won the Canadian Women’s singles and the Canadian women’s doubles title. In 1979 she earned a gold medal in the Pan Am Games and she became the 1st Canadian to win the National Open Women’s Singles title in 1982. After representing Canada in the 1988 Olympics she retired from competition and became the national team coach for the next 10 years. She is a member of the Quebec Sports Hall of Fame and in 2005 she was inducted into the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame. Table Tennis Canada offered an annual Coach of the Year Award named in honour of Mariann. She enjoys photography and is known for her work with the Ottawa Power Wheelchair Hockey League work. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977); Mariann Domonkos, Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame Online Accessed March 2016
 
Christine Mary Forgo Born October 19 1959 Montreal, Quebec. I1972 she won the North American junior 13 title in table tennis. In 1974 she won the Canadian closed junior 15 event followed with winning the Canadian Open Junior 17 event in 1974. S and Mariann Domonkas won the Canadian women doubles in 1976/77. She also holds provincial titles in her home province of Quebec. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Mo Zhang Born January 17, 1989 Shijiazhuang, China. In 2006 she won the Women’s doubles at the North American Table Tennis competition in Rochester, New York, U.S.A. and took the women’s singles at the event in 2009 and 2010. In 2011 she represented Canada winning gold at the Pan Am Games, Guadalajara, Mexico and was also winner in women’s singles at the North American Table Tennis Championships in Mississauga, Ontario. She won a bronze medal at the women’s doubles with Anqi Luo at the Commonwealth Games, Glasgow, Scotland in 2014. She has also won the Woman’s singles event for the North America cup in 2014 and 2015. 
 
Tennis     back
Ethel Mary Babbit

née Hatt. Born Fredericton, New Brunswick July 13, 1876. Died August 20, 1969. A well rounded Athlete Ethel enjoyed and excelled playing in hockey, golf and Tennis. She appeared in both amateur and professional leagues. She was an accomplished tennis player from 1908 through 1927 . She earned titles in Ladies singles and mixed doubles and took national honours in 1910. As a mother of three children she turned to hockey in winter and enjoyed Golf in the Maritime summers. She was the provincial champion and top scorer for the Charlestown Abbies hockey tem in 1937-38 and played with the Hibbing Monarchs the next year. In 1946 she was with the Maritime Intermediates of the Charlestown Legion hockey Team.  She played in Moncton in 1947 and 1948. She was an 8 time member of the PEI Willington Cup golf team between 1939 and 1962. She was ten times in the Canada Amateur Golf Championships and 29 times in the Canadian Professional Golf Association as well as from 1969 through 1976 she was seven times Maritime Champion. She is a welcome member of the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame. Suggested sources: New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame on line
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Carling Kathrin Bassett-Seguso. Born  October 9, 1967 Toronto, Ontario.  This young tennis player burst onto the Canadian sports scene in 1981 when she won the Canadian indoor junior title.  In 1982 she was ranked the number 1 junior in the world. That year she became the youngest winner of the Canadian closed championship. She would win this title again in 1983 and 1986. In 1983 she was named by the World Tennis Association (WTA) as the Most Impressive Newcomer and was Canada's Female Athlete of the Year in both 1983 and 1985.Still on top of her game at 16 she became a fashion model working with the Ford Modeling Agency. She also appeared as an actor in the 1982 film Spring Fever and on TV in 1984 in the Littlest Hobo.   She turned professional in 1983 and played in such international events as the French and Australian Opens and at Wimbledon. In 1987 she won her second top level singles title in Strasbourg, Germany. That same year she married American tennis player Robert Seguso. The couple have two sons and three daughters.  She retired from competition in 1988. In 2003 she was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Marjorie Blackwood

Born Ottawa, Ontario May 1, 1957. She seemed to have always loved tennis. From 1972-1980 she was a member of the Canadian Fed Cup Team. All in all she would capture 14 titles in singles and double play. She was three time Canadian Champion and was ranked by the World Tennis Association 50 top players. From 1977-1979 she was the top ranked player in Canada. In 1983 she was ranked # 48 in the world. She has been able to follow her sport into a professional career and is the Director of Tennis at Whistler , British Columbia Racquet Club. Suggested sources: Who’s Who in Canadian Sports by Bob Ferguson and the Whistler B.C. Racquet Club online.
 

Eugenie 'Genie' Bouchard Born February 25, 1994 Montreal, Quebec. Genie is a fraternal twin sister with Beatrice. She was introduced to playing tennis when she was just five years old. At 12 she moved to Florida with her mother to have private coaching returning to Montreal when she was 15. In 2008 she won the International Tennis Federations (ITF) singles and doubles titles in Costa Rica and the All Canadian ITF singles. In 2009 she won the Canadian under-18 Indoor Championship in Toronto, one of the youngest to win this title. Later in 2009 she won her 1st professional main-draw match at Caserta, Italy and she won the Pan American Closed ITF Championships.  Genie won the Wimbledon girl's title. The following year she was named the World Tennis Association (WTA) Newcomer of the Year. In 2014 she received the WTA Most Improved Player Award.  At the 2014 Wimbledon Championships, Bouchard became the first Canadian to reach the finals of a Grand Slam in singles, finishing runner-up to Petra Kvitová. She also reached the semifinals of the 2014 Australian Open and 2014 French Open. She signed an endorsement deal with Coca-Cola, Rogers Communications Nike and Babolat equipment as well as with Aviva Canada. In the following years Genie had ups and downs in the sport. She Canada in the Fed Cup for the first time in three years, where she posted wins over Kateryna Bondarenko and Lesia Tsurenko to help Canada stay in the World Group II in 2018.
 
Hana Veverka Brabenec Born June 21, 1928, Prague, Czechoslovakia. Married JOSEF Brabenec 1 child. She began playing tennis as a child and for 15 years was among the top 10 Czechoslovakia Women tennis players. She was twice runner up for national champ in Czechoslovakia where she held the national doubles title 4 times. Moving to Canada she shared her talent and her passion by coaching in her sport. In 1983 she won the Women’s Over 50 singles title and with Sandra Sutton she won the Women’s over 50 doubles national title.  In 1990 she took top Women’s over 60 title in both singles and doubles.  Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977.
 
Louise Brown Born November 19, 1922, Dunnville, Ontario. Died November 2003.Louise’s grandfather gave her a tennis racquet when she was 14 and she never looked back. She won the 1957 Canadian Women’s singles tennis title. In 1962 she teamed with Ann Barclay to win Canadian national women’s doubles title. In 1970-1971 she won the Ireland cup as Canadian women’s senior singles champion. She was Captain of the Canadian team’s 1st Federation Cup appearance in 1963 and again in 1964. She was non-playing captain 1966, 1967 and 1969. She was a gold medalist in women’s doubles tennis as the 1st Canada Games in 1969. For 27 consecutive years she was among Canada’s top 10 players and dominated the Ontario provincial tennis scene. Louise married Ross Brown and the couple have 2 children. Louise competed with her son David at the U.S.A. Nationals and her husband Ross.   In 1991 she was inducted into the Canadian Tennis Sport Hall of Fame. Her family set the Louise and Ross Brown Fund for the Development of Canadian Junior Tennis.  Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Canadian Sport 1977; Canadian Tennis Hall of Fame. Online accessed February 2016.  
 
Susan Butt

Born Vancouver, British Columbia March 19, 1938. She studied for her B.A. and her Masters at the University of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. She also received her PhD and earned the respectful title of Doctor. She married Dr. W.D. Liam Fin and the couple have two children. Her joi de vive was enhanced by her avocation for the sport of tennis. In 1960-61 and again in 1967 she was ranked #1 in Canadian singles.  In 1971-72 she returned time to her sport as the non playing Captain for the Canadian Federation Cup team. In all she was the winner of more than 60 Canadian singles and doubles titles. She was a gold medalist in doubles in the 1st Canada Games. She also enjoyed serving her sport and was Vice President of the Canadian Lawn Tennis Association in 1971-71. Combining her love of her professional life and her sport she wrote a book: The Psychology of Sport. Suggested source: Who’s Who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson.
 

Jane Young Cooper Born 1965, Waterloo, Ontario. In 1983 her love of tennis and a racket borrowed from her brother both  helped her to win the Canadian Junior Championship. In 1984 she was presented with a full sports scholarship to the University of Mississippi where she received a BA in Business and administration in 1988. In 1984 she earned the Canadain National Female Sportsmanship Award and the following year, 1985, she was the Canadian Women’s Tennis Champion. In 1986 she was presented the Outstanding Young Citizen Award. in 1987 she was winner of the Tennis teaching professional outstanding Service Award. Her sport took her around the world in competition. Once she had retired from competition she earned a degree in Law from the University of Ottawa and was called to the Bar. Jane married Mark Cooper in 1997 and she works as an assistant Crown Attorney for Waterloo Region of Ontario. Source: Waterloo Region Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed July 2014)
 
Elaine Anna Fildes Born August 31, 1926 Kingston, Ontario. She graduated from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec in 1948 with a bachelor of science degree having majored in physical education. She was an intercollegiate tennis champion from 1944 through 1947, she also played varsity basketball and badminton. She was the number one ranked female tennis player in Canada in 1947 and number two ranked singles player in 1949 and 1950. She alo temed-up with Patricia Macken (1926-   ) to become the toped ranked doubles team in Canada and qualifying for the U.S.A. national championships for three straight years beginning in 1947. In 1944 she served as manager of the McGill university tennis team in 1944 and as head coach in 1950. She also coached the McGill women's basketball team in 1947-1948. She would later teach at the University of Alberta where she was the coach of the women's tennis team. In 2006 she was inducted into the McGill University Athletics and Recreation Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Sarah Hunter

Born White Rock, British Columbia March 16, 1965. As a youngster she loved sports playing in her brother’s soccer league and she was the first girl in her home town to play little league baseball. She became an official at local men’s hockey tournaments. She worked as a youth supervisor at a youth custody centre when on January 23, 1997 while playing hockey she suffered a spinal cord injury that left her with limited mobility in her arms and legs. She became confined to a wheelchair. After extensive rehabilitation the avid sports enthusiast and sports participant was introduced to Have-A-Go Days where people with disabilities were allowed to try various sports and she fell in love with wheelchair tennis. By 200 she was the most improved athlete of the years of the Canadian Tennis Federation. Not only does she play her beloved sport but she is Director of Tennis Canada’s Wheelchair Division. She is a certified tennis instructor and runs beginner tennis programs for both able bodied and disabled student. With her life partner Janet Petros, in March 2006 she became one of a handful of quadriplegic women in Canada to carry a full tem pregnancy. The couple are proud parents of a daughter, Katie.  In 2008- and 2009 she was the Female Athlete of the year of the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association. Source: Accidental Rebel by Charlie Gillis September 24, 2007 Macleans.ca http://macleans.ca/article...   accessed June 2011.
 

Jill Heatherington-Hultquist Born October 27, 1964 Brampton, Ontario. Jill studied at the University of Florida, Gainesville where she played tennis with the Gators women's team from 1984 through 1987. While at university she won four straight Southern Conference singles championships. She also won three consecutive doubles championships form 1985 through 1987. She received four All-American honours. She was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a 'Gator Great' in 1999. In 1983 Jill turned professional. She won one singles title and fourteen doubles titles on the World Tennis Association Tour during her Career. She represented Canada at the Olympic Games in 1984 and again in 1988. She has worked as a coach at the University of Washington. (2018)
 
Patricia Hy-Boulais. Born  August 22, 1965.Phnom Penh, Cambodia   This tennis player began her career in Honk Kong before moving to Canada. In 1886 she turned professional. She became a Canadian citizen in 1991. . Canadian Champion from 1992 through 1999. In 1993 she was ranked no. 28 in the World by the WTA. She has also represented Canada at the Olympic Games in 1992 and in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. Patricia has one daughter. (2018)
 
Patricia 'Pat' Macken-Smart Born July 5, 1928 Montreal, Quebec. Patricia won the junior provincial tennis championships in both Quebec and Ontario between 1943 and 1945. She went on to witn the Vermont State ladies' singles, doubles and mixed doubles titles in the U.S.A. in 1948. She also held three senior ladies' singles championships as well as Ontario ladies' singles, and doubles five times.  Seven times she too the Montreal City and District ladies' singles and doubles events. She won the Canadian Ladies' Open singles, doubles, mixed doubles with her brother Brendan in 1947. In 1950 the Canadian Press declared her the Canadian Female Tennis Player of the Half Century. She was educated at St. Paul's Academy and the College of William and Mary Williamsburg, Virginia, U.S.A.  Patricia married Eldon Smart in 1954 and the couple have two children. (2018)
 
Helen Mersi Kelesi. Born November 15, 1969 Victoria, British Columbia. This tennis player had a form that was so flamboyant on the courts that she was known as "Hurricane Helen". Helen won her 1st Canadian Junior Championship when she was 13.  By 1985 she was considered Canada's most improved tennis player. In 1986, 1987, 1989, and 1990 she was named Tennis Canada Player of the Year  in 1888 she was a member of the 1st Canadian Olympic tennis The Canadian Press voted her the winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year in 1989 and 1990. in 1990 she won her fourth Canadian title the 1st woman to win four consecutive nation senior tennis championships.  She began to suffer from headaches and blackouts and was diagnosed with a brain tumor. She survived several operations and returned to her sport as a coach with Tennis Canada.  She retired from the World Tennis Tour in 1995.She is also a Colour News Commentator for many major tennis events. She is  a motivational speaker for the Brain Tumor Foundation of Canada. In 2008 She was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame and Museum.
 
Wendy Pattenden In 1978 Wendy was the Greater Victoria Female Athelete of the Year. Wendy was a top 100 ranked professional player and 12 time national tennis champion. She served 13 years as both Director of Athlete Development and Head National Team and Olympic Coach for Tennis Canada from 1986 through 1999. Since 1999 Wendy is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Vancouver Canadian Sport Institute /Institut Canadien du sport. In 2004 she earned her Masters in Business Administration (MBA) at Royal Rhoads University. She is an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia's School of Kinesiology in the Faculty of Education. Wendy also serves as the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Canadian Sport for Life framework. In 2003 she was inducted to the Greater Victoria Sports Hall of Fame. (2018)
 
Aleksandra Wozniak. Born September 7, 1987 Montreal, Quebec. Aleksandra, who speaks English, French, and, Polish began to play tennis when she was just able to hold a racket at three years of age. In 2002 she won the Canadian Indoors Under-16 and Under-18 championships. In 2004 she won her 1st Fed Cup match and was Tennis Canada's Female Player of the Year. In January 2005 she reached a ITF junior ranking of no. three. She turned professional in November 2005.In 2006 and again in 2008 she was Tennis Canada's Top Female Player of the Year.  At the Bank of the West Classic in Stanford in 2008, she became the 1st Canadian in 20 years to capture a World Tennis Association (WTA) singles title and the 1st Quebecer in history to have accomplished such a feat. In 2008 she received an award from the National Assembly of Quebec for her career-high ranking of no. 37 and 1st tour singles titles. On June 21 2009 she was ranked as no. 21 making her the fourth highest-ranked Canadian singles tennis player of all time to that date. In 2009 she was Tennis Canada's Top Female Player of the Year and she also won the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's top female athlete of the year. She has own one World Tennis Federation and nine International Tennis Federation tournaments. She participated on Team Canada at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. That same year she was once again Tennis Canada's Female Player of the year and she received the Queen Elizabeth ll Diamond Jubilee Medal. By April 2016 she had won a total of 40 victories in the Fed Cup a Canadian Fed Cup record. She also appeared in 36 ties in the Fed Cup which is also a record. (2018)
 
Track and field      back
 
Natasha Cecily Bacchus Born Toronto, Ontario 1977. Being hearing impaired has never deterred the efforts of this internationally successful track athlete. She began running when she was 10, continued training and attended her first World Summer Games for the Deaf in Bulgaria in 1993. She came home with a gold medal and a sliver medal in the 100 metre and 200 metre event. Since her debut she has competed in Denmark, Germany and other countries. Her accomplishments of some 50 gold medals and trophies have been recognized by such awards as the Jo-Anne Robenson Award for Female Athlete of the Year in 1997, the Harry Jerome Award for Athlete of the Year in 1995 and the Outstanding Achievement in Athletics from the Guyanese Heritage and Cultural Association. Currently studying at university on scholarships she hopes to work with children and be a voice for the needs of other hearing impaired youth in our communities.
 
Marjorie Evelena Bailey

Born November 21, 1947 Lockeport, Nova Scotia. A Practical Nurse by profession, her avocation was track and field especially track sprinting. She competed internationally for Canada. In 1975 she won a bronze medal for the 100 meter in the Pan Am Games. She now lives in Vancouver, British Columbia and enjoys life with her son, Anthony. Suggested source: Who’s who in Canadian Sports by Bob Ferguson
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Gertrude Young Beattie née Phinney. Born January 18, 1909 (sometimes recorded as 1910)  Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia . Died March 8, 2006, Wolfville, Nova Scotia.  Gertrude was a star athlete at Wolfville High School. She went on to Dalhousie University in Halifax where she enjoyed playing basketball and participating in track and field at the Halifax-Dartmouth Athletic Club. She earned a position on the 1928 Olympic track and field team, the 1st Olympic Games for Canadian women to participate but her father refused to let her attend the Games because he believed competition was too strenuous for a woman. She continued to compete in Canada where over 5 years she won over 40 gold medals, including Canadian championships 1927-1929. In 1929 she transferred to Acadia University to study home economics. Here, she played varsity basketball and tennis. Acadia University did not allow track and field events for women because the sports coach for women felt it was too strenuous. She graduated in 1932 and two years later she married Brennan Young (   - 1974). She continued to teach while raising their 5 children A Widow, she remarried in 1978 to Thomas Beattie.  Returning to University when a senior she earned a Bachelor of Education degree in 1981. Gertrude Beattie was one of the 1st two women inducted into the Nova Scotia Sports Hall of Fame. In 2012 she became the 1st woman to be added to the Wall of Honour, Lawrenceville, Nova Scotia. Source: Obituary, Chronical Herald, April 27, 2006. ; Wall of Honour, Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia Online (Accessed January 2014)
 
Debbie Brill.



High Jump
Born March 10, 1953, Mission British Columbia. She began competitive track and Field in 1966 when she was just 13 years old and appeared in her 1st international event at 15. At 16 she became the 1st North American woman to cleat 6’ in the high jump. She used a style of jump that became known as the “Brill Bend”. It was a style that revolutionized this event. Debbie has held the Canadian high jump record since 1969. That year she won a gold medal at the 1st Pacific Conference Games. She took gold again at the 1977 games. In 1970 she earned gold at the Commonwealth games and in 1971 gold at the Pan Am Games. She was disillusioned in the 1972 Olympic Games and retired from competition. In 1975, confidence returned and she returned to place 4th at the 1977 Pan Am Games and a bronze medal at the World Cup. In 1978 she earned a silver at the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta. In 1979 she took a gold at the World Cup in Montreal and was ranked #1 in the world. Canada boycotted the 1980 Olympics so Debbie continued to compete and in 1982 jumped 1.99 meters at the World Indoor High Jump Record just 5 months after giving birth to her son and went on to earn gold in the Commonwealth Games that year. In 1983 she was presented with the Order of Canada.  She set her final outdoor record 1.98 meters (6’6”) in September 1984. In 1989 she was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame. During her days of competition she would attend 65 National and International competitions.  In 1999 she broke the World Masters (athletes over 45 years) record and in 2004 she broke the over 50 Masters record in Australia. Source: British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame Online (Accessed March 2014)
 
Dorothy Elizabeth Brookshaw Born December 20, 1912. Died September 3, 1962. Dorothy competed in the 1936 Olympic Games,  Berlin Germany where she and her team mates Mildred Jeanette Dolson (1918-2004), Hilda May Cameron (1912-2001), and Aileen Aletha Meagher (1910-1987) won the Bronze Medal in the 4 X 100 Metre relay.
 
Hilda May Cameron-Young née Cameron. Born August 14, 1912 Toronto, Ontario. Died April 24, 2001 Toronto, Ontario. At the 1934 British Empire Games she competed in the 220 yards competition and finished fifth. Hilda competed in the 1936 Olympic Games,  Berlin Germany where she and her team mates Mildred Jeanette Dolson (1918-2004), Hilda May Cameron (1912-2001), and Aileen Aletha Meagher (1910-1987) won the Bronze Medal in the 4 X 100 Metre relay.
 
Ethel Catherwood.

Matchless Six
Born Hannah, North Dakota, U.S.A.  April 28, 1908. Died September 26, 1987.The family moved to Canada in 1910.  Ethel was on the 1928 Canadian Olympic team, the first Olympic games to allow women to compete. She won a gold medal for Canada in the high jump when she cleared 5feet 2 inches (1.588m). She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. Updated October 12, 2008. Updated information was supplied by K. V. Booth., a relative of Ethel.
 
Angela Chalmers

Born Brandon, Manitoba September 6, 1963. Even as a child on a military base in Shilo, Manitoba she enjoyed participating in sports days and running events. At 11 she knew she wanted to run in the Olympic Games. When the e family relocated to British Columbia she began running at school track meets and then at a club which saw her traveling to competitions throughout the Province and even into the U.S. At 13 she was back in Manitoba and competing in national events as  National Junior Champion competing with your of 18 years of age. While attending Northern Arizona University in the U.S.A. Angela was 8 time All American in track and cross—country running. In 1990 she competed in the Commonwealth games and won double gold, the first ever to win both the 1,500 and the 3,000 m events. That year the Manitoba Sports Writers named her “Athlete of the Year’ and she also picked up the national Phil Edwards Trophy as outstanding Track Athlete. In 1992 she attained her dream of running in the Olympics winning a bronze medal in the 3,000 m event in Barcelona, Spain. She says one of her proudest moments was when she led the Canadian tem into the Centennial Stadium, Victoria British Columbia. That same yeas Angela, now sporting the Sioux name ”Walks Fast Woman” won an Aboriginal Achievement Award. She was unable to participate in the 1996 Olympics due to injuries. In 2001 Angela was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. Sources: Honour Song : A tribute by Barbara Hagen, Vancouver, Raincoast Books, 1996. ; Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame www.sportshalloffame.mb.ca (accessed September 2011)
 

Pat Cole Pat was a Canadian track and field champion in 1959, and in the same year participated in the Pan American Games in Chicago where she was a finalist in the 60m and 200m. She was also the 1963 Pan American Games coach, taking the team to Brazil.  Pat volunteered and coached the National Track and Field team and accompanied them to Osaka, Japan for the 1969 Pan-Pacific Rim Games. Pat was also a volunteer coach at the Hamilton Olympic Club and she started the McMaster University track and field team from 1967-1977. To recognize McMaster’s top female athletes she introduced the Eagle Award and even introduced Maude, McMaster’s mascot. She initiated a campaign to keep Junior Hockey in Hamilton, organized and operated a city wide Track and Field Program for youngsters 7 to 14 years of age for Hamilton's recreation department. She also assisted organizing and operating a city wide basketball program for girls 7 to 15 years of age. Pat was the 1st woman inducted into McMaster University Sports Hall of Fame. The university bestowed on her the Friends of Distinction Award. In 2015 she was inducted into the Hamilton Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Myrtle Cook

Matchless Six
née Cook Born January 5, 1902 Toronto, Ontario. Died March 18, 1985 Elora, Ontario. A true sporting enthusiast Myrtle excelled at tennis, ice hockey, basketball, bowling, cycling and canoeing.  In 1917 she became a member of the women’s national track and field team. In 1923 she helped established the Toronto Ladies Athletic Club, the 1st of its kind for women in Canada. Later formed the Mercury Athletic Club with Hilda strike. Myrtle was one of the 1 of 6 women, known as the ‘Matchless Six’, to compete in the Olympic Games for Canada. In the Amsterdam Olympic Games of 1928 she won the gold medal in the women’s 4 X 100 meters with Fanny Rosenfeld (1904-1969), Ethel Smith (1907-1978), and Jane Bell (1910-1998). In 1929 she married journalist Lloyd McGowan. Continuing in competitions in the 100 meter and 60 yard events were also won by Myrtle through to 1931. After the 1928 Games she took up journalism with the Montreal Star writing a weekly column ‘In the Women’s Sport Light’. It was as a ski journalist that she was inducted into the Laurentian Ski Hall of fame. She was even asked to coach the Montreal Royals men’s baseball team in base running. She was also involved in training military recruits during World War ll.  She was a member of British Empire/Commonwealth Games Committee throughout her life and a member of the Olympic Committee from 1932 through 1972. Myrtle became known as "Canada's First Lady of Sport," and in 1949 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame followed in 1955 with inclusion in Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Temple de la renommée du pantheon des sports du Québec in 1974. Athletic Canada presents the Myrtle Cook Trophy for Young Athlete of the Year. Sources: The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (accessed 2008); Paul Patton, “Cook led the way for women athletes” in the Globe and Mail, March 22, 1985 Page 23.
 
Charmaine Crooks Born Jamaica. She emigrated to Canada when she was 6 years old. At 16 she took her favourite sport of running seriously and made the 1980 Olympic team. She would go on in her sport to win medals at the Olympics, Commonwealth and Pan American Games as well as the World Cup. She was time Canadian National Champion in the 400 and 800 metre event and was the first Canadian to break the to minute barrier for the 800 m distance. In 1996 she was Canada's flag bearer for the opening ceremony at the Olympics in Atlanta. She continued her Olympic commitment by being a founding member of the International Olympic Committee Ethics Commission and worked on the IOC Press Commission and the Culture and Education Committee. She received recognition for her community service with the 1992 Governor General's Award. It is no surprise to learn that she is working on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Committee!!
 
Maureen Adele Crowley Born May 26 1953, Brampton, Ontario.  She was a member of the Canadian junior track team in 1971-1973. In 1973 she won the Canadian senior 800 meter title. At the 1974 Commonwealth Games , Christchurch, New Zealand she won a bronze medal in the 4 X 400 meter track relay and a silver medal in 1500 meter event. Maureen studied at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia. Sources: Who’s who in Canadian Sport by Bob Ferguson, (Scarborough: Prentice Hall, 1977 (Posted Mar 2016)
 
Eva Dawes Born 1912 Toronto, Ontario. Eva was a star in the track and field event of high jump. She wan the Canadian title for the 1st time in 1928. She was considered to young to travel to the 1928 Olympic Games held in Amsterdam, Netherlands. In 1932, once again national gold medalist, she earned a Bronze medal jumping 1 metre 60. at the Olympic Games held in Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.  She would jump for a silver medal in the British Empire Games in London, England 1934. In 1936 she was not able to participate in the Olympic Games in Germany due to a boycott of the Natzi Regime Games. In 1937 she retired from her sport, married and settled in England. (2018)
 
Amy Diooenbaker

Wheelchair sports Champion

At 14 she had an operation after a ski accident but there was the complication of gangrene and lost the use of a leg.  At that time she was told that she would never finish school nor would she have a career. These statements just fueled her youthful determination. She became a wheel chair athlete playing basketball and claiming three world wheelchair track records. She also really enjoys the thrill of kayaking. She attended the University of Guelph in Ontario where she became a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. In 1992, just after being out of school a few years she was diagnosed with having Multiple Sclerosis. This did not slow her career as a vet or her enjoyment and participation in sports. She runs her own companion animal mobile service in Chelsey, Ontario which has earned her an entrepreneurial award in 200. In 1998 she earned the King Clancy Award in sports and in 2001 she was inducted into the Terry Fox Hall of Fame. She has raised more than $20,000.00 for Cancer Research with her participation in the Terry Fox Runs over the years. She has also begun to express herself by playing the violin and is learning how to construct her own instrument. To totally relax she enjoys gardening. Source: Saskatoon Women’s Calendar Collective. Herstory 2007: the Canadian Women’s Calendar (Regina: Coteau Books, 2006)  pg. 28
 

Mildred Jeannette Dolson-Cavill née Dolson. Born August 13, 1918 Toronto, Ontario. Died July 17, 2004 North Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. In the 1936 Olympics Berlin, Germany, she won the Bronze Medal in the $ X 100 metres relay track and filed event with her team mates Dorothy Elizabeth Brookshaw (1912-1962), Hilda May Cameron (1912-2001) and Aileen Aletha Meager (1910-1987). At the 1938 Empire Games she was a member of the Canadian team which won the Silver Medal in the 110-220-110 yards relay  and the Bronze Medal in the 220-110-220-110 yards relay event. She also won the Bronze Medal in the 100 yards competition. In 1939 Jeanette was awarded the Velma Springstead Trophy  as Canada's Outstanding Female Athlete for Track and Field.  
 
Shirley Gretchen Eckel-Kerr Born February 3, 1932 Toronto, Ontario. At 12 she placed fourth internationally in the 50 metres hurdles competition. In 1945-1946 season she won a gold medal at the junior Olympics. At 20 she held the Canadian title in the 80 metres hurdles and a record. In 1953 she was eight in the world and a member of the Canadian Olympic team. At the 1954 British Empire Games she placed fifth while setting a new Canadian record. In 1955 she was once again the top Canadian in women's hurdles. Throughout her career she was North American Champion in hurdles. Shirley earned her Bachelor degree from the University of Toronto. Shirley Married Dr. William H. Kerr and the couple had four children.
 
Dana Ellis Born December 7, 1979, Kitchener, Ontario. At four she was taking classes in gymnastics and loving it. She would carry on and earn a position on the Canadian National Gymnastics Team. However an injury prevented her from continuing in gymnastics and she tuned to track and field , specifically pole vault. In 2002 she was athlete of the year at the University of Waterloo. From 2000 through 2008 she was the indoor and outdoor Canadian National Record holder in Women’s Pole Vault. In 2004 and 2005 she was a gold medalist at the Canadian National Track and Filed Championships. At the 2006 Athens Olympic Games she placed 6th and 4th in the Commonwealth Games and was Canada’s Field Athlete of the Year. She could not compete in the Beijing Olympics due to injuries. Her sporting career did not interrupt her scholastic studies. She spent 2 years at St Mathew’s School of Medicine in the Grand Cayman Islands before transferring to Tulane University in Louisiana, U.S.A. to be near her husband who was a fellow pole vaulter and coach in the sport. Dr. Elles may have retired officially from her sport in 2008 but she still has the urge now and then and had to wait until the feeling passes.
 
Perdita Felicien


Hurdler
Born August 29, 1980 Pickering, Ontario. Perdita began participating in track and field events while she was in high school where she did 200 metre dash and high jump and won the Ontario high-school hurdling championship in 1998. That same year she earned her 1st followed by a second Canadian Junior Championship. She earned a scholarship to attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, U.S.A. At her 1st year of university she earned All-American honours in the 100 metre hurdles and set a record.  and in her second year at university she was the 1st Illinois athlete to win a national championship during both the indoor and outdoor seasons. For three years she was named University of Illinois Female Athlete of the Year and was voted the U.S. Track Coaches Association National Female outdoor Athlete of the Year. In 2003 she won the World Championships in Athlete Paris, France she won the women's 100 metre hurdles final becoming Canada's 1st female world Gold medalist in women's hurdles. That year the Canadian Press voted her winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Tope Female Athlete of the Year, the 1st track and field athlete to win the award in 25 years. In 2004 she was Canadian Track and Field Athlete of the Year. In 2007 she won a Silver Medal at the Pan Am Games.  Injured she could not compete in the 2008 Olympics, Beijing, China but did serve as a guest commentator for CBC TV Olympic coverage of the hurdles event.  In 2011 she was at the University of Calgary in Alberta  training and ranking 6th best hepathlete in the world. In 2011 she won her tenth Canadian Title in hurdles. She retired from competition in 2013 to finish her studies in journalism. She was a writer and reporter with CHCH News, Hamilton Ontario and part of the broadcasting team for the 2015 Toronto  PanAm Games. Perdita is a proud supporter of Count Me In, the largest youth-run organization in Canada. She spoke to at the 2013 Count Me In Conference in Toronto, inspiring thousands of students to get involved in their communities through volunteerism.
 
Barbara Joan Fisher

 

Sprinter

Born September 20 1949 Ottawa, Ontario. In 1965 Joan set the Canadian midget record for the 60 yard  and the 220 yard events. In 1967 she set the Canadian Juvenile record for the 100 yard dash event. In 1967 she represented Canada in the 4 X 100 metre relay at the Pan-Am Games. The following year she was again setting records this time in the Junior 220 yard event. In the 1968 Olympic trials she won the 200 metre and 400 metre events. She reached the semi finals in the Olympic Games in Mexico in 1968. Joan attended Carleton University and worked as a personnel administrator . In 2014 she was amongst the 1st people to be inducted into the Hall of Fame at Fisher High School in Ottawa where she had excelled in running and high jump.
Jane Haist Born March 1, 1949, Thornhill, Ontario. In 1974 Commonwealth Games she won gold medal in shot put and discus throw and won the Rowell trophy as Outstanding Canadian Athlete in weight event.  In 1975 she won a bronze in discus in the Pan-Am Games. In 1977 while attending the University of Tennessee she was national U.S.A. collegiate champion in the discus. She has served as a coach at Niagara Regionals Athletics. In November 2012 she was inducted into the Tennessee Lady Volunteer Hall of Fame, Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.A. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Joan Lynn Hendry Born May 14, 1945, Glasgow, Scotland. Competing in the 1960’s she was Canadian long jump champion in 1968 and silver medalist in 1964, 1967 and 1969 and took bronze in 1966. She was the 1st Canadian woman to jump over 6 meters in the long jump.  She won the relay silver medal at the 1969 Tokyo Pan Pacific Games and the following year took 2 bronze medals, in long jump and the 4 X 100 relay at the Edinburgh Commonwealth the Games. While she was named to the Canadian team for the Munich Germany Olympic games an injury forced her to withdraw. She earned her B.A. at the University of Ottawa and after attending Ottawa Teachers College she taught elementary school and was also an amateur track and field coach in Ottawa retiring in 1999. In May 2009 she was inducted into the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame. Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);; Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame Online accessed 2012.
 
Robina Higgins-Haight
Born April 28, 1915 Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died December 31, 1990 Winnipeg, Manitoba. A Track and field competitor she competed in javelin, shot put, discus, and ball throw setting long standing Canadian records. She won nine national titles ad was awarded the Velma Springstead Trophy from the Women's Amateur Athletic Federation in 1937. She held three titles in javelin and ball throw, two titles in shot put and one in discus. In the 1938 British Empire Games, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia she took the Gold Medal in javelin. In the winter months Robina enjoyed playing basketball for the Toronto Dominion Business College team which won five consecutive city and provincial basketball championships. Robina retired from competition in 1940 and worked as a stenographer during World War ll. After the War she enjoyed golfing and curling.  Robina was inducted into the Manitoba Sport Hall of Fame in 1984 and in 2015 into the Canadian Sport Hall of Fame.
Abigail 'Abby' Hoffman.  Born February 11, 1947, Toronto, Ontario. As a 11 year old hockey player she shocked everyone by playing peewee hockey on a team for boys having registered as AB in order to play! She was the best player on the team but when required to produce a birth certificate was disqualified from playing!  At 15 she won her 1st national championship in the 880-yard foot race.  She competed internationally for Canada at many events, including 4 Olympic Games, 4 Pan-Am Games and 2 Commonwealth Games.3 World Student Games. She held Canadian and world records in the 800 meter from 1962 to 1975. In 1975 she earned the Ontario Award of Merit.  In 1976 she was presented the City of Toronto Civic Award of Merit. A champion for athlete’s rights and women in sport she is following a solid career as a sports administrator. She earned her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto. In 1981 she became Director General of Sport Canada. that same year she became the 1st woman appointed to the executive committee of the Canadian Olympic Committee.   In 1982 she was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.  In 1995 she was the 1st woman on the Executive Council of the International Amateur Athletic Federation. Leaving Sport Canada in 1993 she became the 1st Director General of Health Canada's new Women's Health Bureau. In 2004 she was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. In 2007 she entered the Jewish Canadian Athletes Hall of Fame. Source: Bob Ferguson, Who's Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto, Prentice Hall, 1977); Canada's Sport Hall of Fame Online Accessed 2015.
 
Barbara Howard Born May 8, 1920 Vancouver, British Columbia. Died January 26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia. Even during her days attending public school Barbara was a fast runner. While attending high school she was recognized for her prowess on the track. In 1937 she was chosen to represent Canada after she beat the British Empire record for the 100 yard spring at the Western Canadian British Empire Game trials with a time of 11.2 seconds. At the British Empire Games in 1938 in Sydney, Australia she was nervous and came only 6th in the 100 yard event. However, she won a silver medal in the 440 yard event and a bronze medal in the 660 yard relay. She was the 1st Black Canadian to compete internationally. There were no Olympic Games in 1940 and 1944 with the second world ward took world attention. She went on to attend Normal School (teacher’s college) earning a Bachelor of Education from the University or British Columbia. In 1941 she became the 1st visible minority person hired by the Vancouver School Board. She taught for 43 years retiring in 1984. She was inducted into the British Columbia Sport Hall of Fame in 2012.
 
Diane Helen Jones-Konihowski Born March 7, 1951 Vancouver British Columbia. Diane was raised in Saskatoon and was given the nickname the ‘Saskatoon Sunflower’. She was Canadian pentathlon champion in 1969, 1972 and 1976. In 1970 she won the junior title. In 1974 she was the Canadian senior indoor long jump champion. In the 1974 and in the 1975 Pan Am Games, Mexico, she won the gold medal. She married professional football player John Konihowski in 1977. She was the 1978 Commonwealth Champion and that same year she became a Member of the Order of Canada.  In 1979 Pan Am Games she also won gold. Selected for the team Canada for the 1980 Olympics she could not participate because Canada boycotted the Olympic Games in Moscow but she was the winner of the pentathlon at the Liberty Bell Classic (alternate Olympic competition) in 1980. That year she was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sport Hall of Fame. In 1983 she retired from competitive sport. In 1996 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Sports Hall of Fame.  She served as Chef de Mission of the 2000 Canadian Olympic Team in Sydney, Australia and she was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and was awarded the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award and the Velma Springstead Trophy as Canada’s best female athlete. In 2005 she was elected to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Olympic Committee.
 
Exilde LaChapelle Little is known about Exilde except that she excelled at long-distance running in the early days of modern recorded sports. She loved to run long distance at a time when it was expected that women would only be spectators of such a sport. Some of her records remained the time to beat for over 100 years! In New York, U.S.A. in March 1879 she covered 88 miles in 24 hours. This record was not defeated until May 1986. That same year she ran 184 miles 528 yards in 3 days and record surpassed only in May 1988. In December 1879 she ran 206 miles, 532 yards a record that was not defeated until May 1988. Another race at this time was 244 miles in 5 days which was overcome only in December 1985. IN San Francisco in May 1881 in a 6 day race she ran 353 miles and again this record was only broken in May 1988.
 
Nancy McCredie Born February 5, 1945 Belleville, Ontario. Nancy's family relocated to Brampton, Ontario when she was a child. In 1963 while a student at Brampton High School Nancy won tow Gold Medals at the Pan American Games in Sao Paulo, Brazil in the shot put and discus events. That same year she earned the Velma Springstead Trophy as Canada's outstanding female athlete and was top field athlete of the year. She participated at the Olympics, Tokyo, Japan in 1964, and the British Empire Games, Jamaica in 1966 where she won a bronze medal in shot put. Competing at the Pan Am Games in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 1967 she took a gold medal in the shot put Event. Nancy was the 1st woman inducted into the Athletes section of the City of Brampton Sports Hall of Fame. The  City of Brampton also named a street and a park in her honour.  After a knee injury Nancy retired from competition in 1968. It was in 1968 when she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. In 2001 Nancy relocated to Bristol, Quebec to become an artist. In 2016 she was inducted into the Athletics Ontario Hall of Fame,  (2018)
 
Jacqueline 'Jackie' MacDonald-Gelling née MacDonald. Born October 12, 1932 Toronto, Ontario. Jackie was the Ontrario junior diving champion in 1945. She also enjoyed playing team sports playing with the junior baskeball champion Toronto Globetrotters in 1949-1950. In 1953 she held the Canadian shot put title and and set the Canadian shot put record to wing a silver medal at the British Empire Games, Vancouver in 1954. Jackie won  1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games, and finished fifth in the discus throw at the 1955 Pan American Games.  She competed in the shot put and discus throw at the 1956 Summer Olympics, Melbourne, Australia. Jackie attended Carleton University Ottawa, Ontario and went on to become a teacher. In 1958 she tool the Bronze medal at the 1958 Commonwealth Games. She married William 'Bill' Gelling and he couple has two children. In later live and into her 80's Jackie was still setting records as a member of the Ottawa Bicycle Club. She does regular wight training to retain her strength. In 2012 Jackie donated her scrapbooks which covered sporting events between 1947 and 1958 to the Archives of Ontario. Her scrapbooks tell the story of the history of amateur sport in Canada, in particular the challenges and accomplishments of our female athletes of this era. (2018)
 
Aileen Alethea Meagher

Born November 26, 1910, Edmonton Alberta. Died August 2, 1987 Halifax, Nova Scotia. She attended Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia and received a teaching degree. On July 1, 1932 she participated in her 1st major track meet where she gained a position on the Canadian Olympic Track team. On the track she earned the nick name 'the flying schoolmarm'. In 1934 she took a Bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 400 meter relay. In 1935 she was declared Canada’s Outstanding Woman Athlete and Canadian Athlete of the Year.  In 1936 at the Berlin Olympic Games she won Silver and Bronze Medals on the track. In 1938 at the British Empire Games in Sydney Australia she won two medals. She is a member of the Nova Scotia and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. In 1965 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame and she is a member of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame.  The Aileen Meagher International Track Classic is held as an annual event in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 2018 Meagher was named one of the greatest 15 athletes in Nova Scotia's history, ranking eighth.
 

Leah Pells Born Vancouver, British Columbia September 11, 1964. She has loved to run since she was very young. She joined the Canadian team in 1990 and dedicated herself to being a full time athlete. She has represented Canada at 2 Olympic Games, 2 Commonwealth Games and has competed in 4 athletics World Championships. Her forth place finish at the age of 32, at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 was down to the wire! In 1999 she married, literally the boy next door, John Turenne. July 1, 2002 she became a first time mother to a son. Still dedicated to her sport she does public appearances  for sports organizations and writes a column 'On the Run With Leah' for her local newspaper.
 
Chantal Peticlerc.

Wheelchair sports

Born December 15, 1969, Saint-Marc-des Carriéres, Quebec. When she was just 13 she lost the use of both legs in an accident. At 18 she was introduced to wheelchair sports at Université Laval, Quebec City. Coming dead last in her 1st race only encouraged her to get more involved.  This television host for Lotto Quebec has become the 1st woman Canadian star in the sport of wheelchair athletics. She participated in the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games winning two bronze medals. In the summer of 1995 she won 5 gold medals at the world championships for wheel chair athletics, and in 1996 she brought home 5 medal from the Paralympics. In 2002 she received the Queen's Jubilee Medal In 2004, in Athens, Greece, she earned her 1st Olympic Games gold. In 2005 she became a Knight in the Order of Quebec. In 2008 she would earn 5 gold medals at the Beijing Paralympics Games. In 2008 she received the Lou March Award as Canada’s top athlete and the Canadian Press Female Athlete of the Year.  In 2009 she held world records in the 100 meter (m), 200m, 400m, 800m and 1,500m events. That same year she received a star on Canada's Walk of Fame in Toronto, Ontario and was inducted as a Companion in the Order of Canada.  She is active in the Right To Play as athlete ambassador and motivational speaker, inspiring countless people to overcome challenges. In 2012 she became a recipient of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal.  March 16, 2016 she was named to the Senate of Canada. 
 
Fanny “Bobbie” Rosenfeld.


Matchless Six
Born  December 28, 1903 Ekaterinoslav, Russia (Now Dnipro, Ukraine) . Died November 13, 1969 Toronto Ontario. While she was still and infant her family relocated to Canada settling in Barrie, Ontario. As a child growing up she loved to run and she loved competition winning her 1st race at a picnic when she was 9 years old. In 1922 the family relocated to Toronto where Fanny worked at a Chocolate factory. She also enjoyed playing basketball, softball, lacrosse, and tennis. She also played ice hockey in the 1920's and 1930's where she was considered a superwoman and was one of Canada's female hockey players playing for the Toronto Patterson Pats. She helped to form the Ladies Ontario Hockey association in 1924 and served as president from 1934-1939. She was a member of the 1928 Olympic team, the 1st time Canadian women competed. This 1928 women's team was dubbed The Matchless Six since they earned medals in Track and Field. Bobbie won a gold medal for the 400 metre relay and a silver medal for the 100 metre event.  She retied from competition in 1933 after developing arthritis. In 1934 she was coach of the Canadian women's track and field team at the British Commonwealth Games, London, England. In 1936 she began working as a journalist in the sports department of the Toronto Globe and Mail newspaper where in 1937 she introduced a column called Feminine Sports Reel. She covered women's sports for 18 years. In 1939 she was the coach of Langley's Lakesides softball team. In 1950 she was declared Canada’s woman athlete of the half century.   She earned the nick name Bobbie for her short 'bobbed haircut. In 1955 she was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. She was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. The Bobbie Rosenfeld Award is given to Canada's female athlete of the year.
 
Ethel May Smith.

Matchless Six.
Born July 5,1907 Toronto, Ontario. Died December 31, 1979 Toronto, Ontario.  At 14 when she was in grade 8, she quit school and went to work in the Toronto garment district in order to help support her family. She played on the company baseball, basketball, and track and field teams. In 1927 she won the 220 yards at the National Championships. At the 1928 Olympic trials in Halifax, Nova Scotia she showed her sport talents. She teamed with Bobbie Rosenfeld (1904-1969), Myrtle Cook (1902-1985) and Jane Bell (1910-1998) to win the gold medal in the 400m relay at the 1928 Olympic games, the1st games that allowed women to compete. The Canadian women team of 1928 were known as the Matchless Six.  Ethel also won the bronze medal in the 100m sprint at the same games. Ethel retired from competition in 1929 after winning the Ontario Championships.  She is a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Velma Agnes Springstead Born August 22, 1906 Hamilton, Ontario. Died March 27, 1927 Hamilton, Ontario.  In 1925 when the Men's Amateur Athletic Union of Canada was invited to send a women's team to London England for competition and Velva, who worked as a secretary at the Tuckett Tobacco Company, won the selection trials held July 11, 1925, in the high jump. Velma loved sports and played softball and basketball for the Hamilton Ladies Club. She also was a winner in track and field events such a printing, hurdling and high jump. In 1925 she would join the 1st team ever to compete internationally in women's track and field. Velma placed third in the high jump and fourth in the hurdles. She was voted winner of the Lord Decies Trophy as all round athlete of the meet. In 1926 the Women's Amateur Athletic Federation of Canada (WAAF) was founded. In March 1927 Velma was hospitalized with severe chest pains and died three days later of pneumonia. Her ambition and zest for living became her legacy. In 1932 Alexandrine Gibb (1891-1958) and the WAAF created the Velma Springstead Trophy to honour the top Canadian female athlete each year.
 
Hilda Strike. Born September 1, 1910, Montreal, Quebec. Died March 9, 1989 Ottawa, Ontario. (Married name Sisson) An avid participant in almost every sport at high school she was encouraged to join the Canadian Ladies Athletic Club. In February 1930, Hilda Strike took part in a track and field meet at the Coliseum in Toronto. In company with Myrtle Cook (1902-1985), Louise Jeffreys and Lillian May, she was part of the 1st Québec women's team in a domestic Canadian track and field championship. Between 1929 and 1932 she earned a total some 30 medals in various North American competitions. In July 1932 she participated in the Canadian track and field championships in Hamilton. For the 1st time in Canadian history, all provinces sent female delegates to this event whose results would determine the composition of the national Olympic team in Los Angeles. At the Olympic Games  On August 2, 1932,  she won Olympic silver in a photo finish with another athlete, Stanislawa Walasiewicz, a Polish athlete also known as Stella Walsh (1911-1980). Upon the death of Walsh, an autopsy showed that Walsh had male genitalia and was intersex, a relatively rare but normal for of human biology. Many argued that the gold medal should have been awarded to Hilda. On August 7, 1932 Hilda won silver as part of the relay team with Mildred Frizzell, Mary Frizzelland Lillian Palmer. Hilda was named Canada’s top female athlete by the Women’s Amateur Athletic Federation of Canada and in December 1932 Hilda became the 1st woman selected for the Norton H. Crowe Memorial.  In 1933 she and former Olympian Myrtle Cook-McGowan (1902-1985) founded the Mercury Athletic Club of Montreal and began her training for the British Empire Games. That year she was second behind golfer Ada Mackenzie in the 1st ever Canadian Press vote for Canada’s female athlete of the year (which became the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award). At the 1934 British Empire Games she won the silver medal in the 100 yard event and was a member of the relay team with Aileen Meagher and Audrey Dearnley, winning the silver medal in the 110-220-110 yards event. The following year she married Frederick Sisson and retired from competition. In 1964 she was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of fame and in 1972 Hilda became a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Angella Taylor - Issajenko née Taylor.  Born September 28, 1958, Jamaica.  Known in her sports career as Angella Taylor, she is one of Canada’s outstanding sprinters.  She holds international medals from the Pan-American Games 1978, the 1982 & 1986 Commonwealth Games, and the 1984 Olympic Games. From 1979 through 1992 she held the Canadian National 100 Meter champion title as well as being 8 times Canada’s National 200 meters Champion.  She has received in 1980 &1982 the Velma Springstead Trophy for Female Athlete of the Year. She has also earned in 1982 the Phil Edwards Memorial Award as Top Field Athlete from the Canadian Federation of Track and Field. in 1983 she received the Sport Excellence Award. She has been female athlete of the year and holds 7 Canadian Championship titles.  Angella Married Tony Snow and in 1985 she became a Member of the Order of Canada and that same year she gave birth to the 1st of her 4 children.  After the Ben Johnson drug scandal in 1988 she gave detailed testimony at the Dubin Inquiry and was banned from competition and later reinstated only to be placed on probation again.  She works with learning-disabled elementary students and is also a coach at the Toronto Track and Field Center at York University. Source: Canadian Encyclopedia Online (accessed 2004)
 
Elizabeth 'Betty' Gardner Taylor- Campbell Born February 22, 1916 Ingersoll, Ontario. Died February 2, 1977. Betty was a track a field athlete who competed for Canada in the 1932 in Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.  In the 1934 British Empire Games  Games, London, England she won the Silver Medal in the 80 metre hurdles and at the Women's World Track and Field Games also held in London, England.. In 1936 at the Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany she would set a new Canadian record of 11.7 seconds in the 80 metre hurdles winning a Bronze Medal. That year she was voted by the Canadian Press winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete.
 
Deborah 'Debbie' Van Kiekebelt Born March 1, 1954 Kitchener, Ontario. At the 1971 Pan American Games, Cali , Columbia, Debbie won the Gold Medal in pentathlon event which includes Shooting, swimming, fencing equestrianism, and cross country running. In 1971 she was voted by the Canadian Press as winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's Top Female Athlete of the Year.  In the 1972 Olympics, Munich, Germany in the long jump and Pentathlon but did not win a place on the podium. In 1973 at the Pacific Conference Games she took a Silver Medal in the high jump. In 1977 she was inducted into the Mississauga Sports Hall of Famed.  After retirement from competition she went on to a career as the 1st female Canadian broadcaster/sportscaster working with CityTV and NBC and hosted six TV series. Debbie runs her own production and promotional company, DVK Enterprises. She was a director for the See You in Athens Fund which supported Canadian athletes attending the 2004 Olympic Games.
 
Julie White

High Jump
Born June 1, 1960 Bancroft, Ontario. In 1975 set a Canadian junior high jump record of 1.84 metres. She received provincial championship certificated for the high jump in 1975, 1977, 1978 and 1979. This record was not broken until 1988.  In 1976 she participated in the Olympic Summer Games in High Jump. That same year she established a Canadian indoor high jump record of 1.86 metres at the Toronto Star Games. In 1978 she established a Canadain junior pentathlon record and was the national indoor pentathlon champion in 1982. In 1983 she participaed in the World Student Games, Edmonton, Alberta was her last competition. As the result of an ankle injury and surgery in October 1983 she was no longer able to compete. She From 1980 through 1985 she attended Boston University, Boston, Massacheutts, U.S.A. earning a degree in Management. (2018)
 
Thelma Sonia Wright née Wright Born Eastbourne, England October 9, 1951.She attended the University of British Columbia earning a Bachelor degree in Physical Education and then earned her teacher’s certificate while maintaining her sport career.  She joined the Canadian Track and Field National team in 1969 and for a decade held a position on the world competitive podium establishing a role model for those who follow. She specialized in running middle distances and later in cross country running. She has won sliver medals at the World Student Games (1972) and the Mexico Pan-Am Games (1975) Add to these,  bronze medals at the Commonwealth Games (1970), US Cross Country (1970) , Pan Pacific Games (1973), Commonwealth Games (1974) and the 1975 New Zealand Games. It is impressive podium time. She was a member of the Canadian Olympic Track and Field team in 1972 and 1976. During her career Wright was a four time Canadian champion in the 1500 metre, and seven-time Canadian champion in the cross-country. Returning to the University of British Columbia 1987 she was coach to the track and field team for one year and during the summer of 1988 coached UBC's cross-country team. In 1988 she was also responsible for resurrecting University‘s track and field summer sports camp. She has been inducted into the UBC Sports Hall of Fame and the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame.
 
Hilda May Cameron Young

Born Toronto, Ontario August 14, 1912. Died April 2001. She always loved to run. She competed in the 1934 British Empire Games where she finished firth in the 22o yard competition. The coaches  then suggested that she run a shorter distance. Although eliminated from the 100 yard individual event in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin Germany she and her team mates Dorothy Brookshaw, Mildred Dolson and Aileen Meagher would win the Bronze medal in the 100 yard relay (4 X 100). Hilda later married and spent the rest of her life in her beloved Toronto. Source: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Hilda_Cameron  (Accessed May 2009).
 

Triathalon
Lorene Hatelt Born 1959, Calgary, Alberta. When Lorene was just nine years old she suffered a brain aneurysm and as a result has a muscle spastidy but she never let this hold her back from the love of participating in sports. In 1969 she moved with her family to Bramalea, Ontario. She played softball in the Chinguacousy Girls Minor softball Association and moved up to the Bramalea Ladies Softball Association as an adult. In the mid 1980's she became a member of the National Triathlon Team. In the Triathlon the Olympic distance originally  included a 1.5 km swim, a 40 km bike ride and a 10 Km Run, this has since become a 750 metre swim ad 2 km bike event and a 5 km run.  She became a three time International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Champion for the Physically Challenged. In 1988 she was inducted into the Brampton, Ontario Sport Hall of Fame. In 2002 a tumor was removed from her Achilles tendon and then she was back into competition. In 2007 she worked at Hartland Printing and Graphics in Mississauga and has also worked as a Sales Representative for the Brampton Business times and with BreezeMaxWeb Online Media Solutions.  In 2008 she won the World Championships held in Vancouver. In 2009 as the result of a bike accident she broke three ribs but was soon back on her bike. In 2010, the first formal event with a team Canada appearance Lorene garnered her 8th world title in Budapest Hungary. She has served in the ITU Triathlon governing body for the international Olympic Committee heading the committee for the Physically Challenged with the goal of having triathlon in the Parolympics. She is a certified personal trained and has been YMCA Multiple Athlete of the Year.  
Weightlifting     back
Maryse Turcotte In 1990, while a student in high school, she helped out at a sports event in weightlifting and she fell en love with the sport. In 1997 she made history by becoming the first woman in the America's to lift double her body weight. She has earned a silver medal at the 1998 World Championships, a gold medal at  the Pan American Games in 1999 and gold in both 2000 and 2001 College and University World Games. She place forth in the Olympics in Sydney Australia.
 
Walking      back
Tina Poitras.  Born Thompson, Manitoba October 5, 1970. Tina grew up in Hull, Quebec across the river from Canada's capital, Ottawa.  This athlete is a race walker who specializes in the 10 km walk. She is currently ranked number 1 in this event in Canada.  She participated, for Canada, in the 1996 Olympic Games in this event. 
 
Water Skiing          back
Hélène Madeleine Grégoire Born March 10, 1953, Hull, Quebec. Helene won the girls’ division of the Canadian championship in 1969-70 with a gold in slalom, jumping, and tricks. She joined the national water ski team from 1970-1977 and was French-Canadian amateur athlete of the year. She participated in the 1972 Pan Am Games in Mexico. She took gold at the Canadian championships in 1973. In 1974 and again in 1975. She earned the water-skiing sports merit award in 1974 form Quebec- Sports Federation. In total she would win 10 national titles and 6 gold medals in Ca-Am competitions. In 1987 she was inducted into the Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame. Source Bob Ferguson, Who’s Who in Canadian Sport (Toronto: Prentice Hall 1977);
 
Ann Klager Higgs

Born 1949, Hespler, Ontario In the 1969-1970 season she was the Overall Canadian Women’s Waterskiing Champion. In 1969 she won gold medals in Slalom, Tricks and Jumps at the Canada Summer Games in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In August 1970 she won the Canadian Women’s Overall Championship for a second time. Unfortunately in 1971 she was injured and forced to retire from her sport. Source: Waterloo Region Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed July 2014)

Beth Leboff Born Montreal, Quebec. It seemed that when she was growing up at her family cottage in the Laurentian Mountains of Quebec that all she wanted to do was water ski. Then she learned how to do it bare foot! She was hooked. The family found her a coach. She won the Canadian National Slalom event in 1991. In 1992 she swept gold in the overall category. She was the Quebec Water ski federation athlete of the Year for both 1991 and 1992. It was in 1992 she would become the only Canadian to win a world record elite title in barefoot water skiing. She accomplished this honour in grace and determination setting a new Canadian record in Women's jumping. She is currently practicing law in fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S.A. where she is a mother of 2 children.
 
Judy McClintock-Messer née McCintock. Born 1963. The entire family of five brothers and one sister enjoyed water skiing. 4 family members would go on to be National Team Members. Judy won her first national title when she was just 9!  Between 1979 and 1995 she competed every year. She holds 2 word titles in tricks and overall water skiing categories. Her titles were won ten years apart in 1985 and 1995! Her career saw her break Canadian records 48 times! She won a a total of 30 national titles and claimed 4 masters titles. Retired from competitive water skiing she now enjoys competing in long distance running like the Boston Marathon. In summer 2005, Judy was inducted into the International Water Skiing Hall of Fame.
 
Pat Messner Born Hamilton, Ontario March 17, 1954. This former Girl Guide was the first Canadian woman to win a world championship in waterskiing in 1979. She is also the first Canadian woman to win an Olympic medal in her sport. Pat won a bronze Olympic medal in the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany. She holds 19 Canadian titles and 20 national records. She is also the first Canadian woman to have won the United States Master’s waterskiing title. She is the founder of the Water Ski and Wakeboard Canadian Hall of Fame. In her spare time she has a career as a high school teacher, musician and paramedic. She was inducted into the Order of Canada in 1980, the youngest Canadian woman to ever receive this honour.
 
Wrestling    back
Carol Huynh

Born November 16, 1980 New Hazelton, British Columbia. Her parents were refugees from Vietnam who were sponsored by the United Church of Canada. She and her sisters all enjoyed wrestling when growing up but she was the one who joined competitions. In 1998 she stared university studies at Simon Fraser and in 2007 studied at the University of Calgary in Alberta. In 2005 she married Dan Biggs, the son of a former wrestler. In the 2008 Beijing Olympics she won gold in the 48kg weight class women wrestling. It was a first gold medal for Canada in this sport and she had defeated a 3 time world champion to gain the medal. Source: United Church Observer www.ucobserver.org October 2008.
 

Christine Nordhagen Vierling Born Alberta June 26, 1971. In ten years of competition, Christine won 10 consecutive Canadian Championships and 6 world titles! In 2004 women's wrestling was finally established as and Olympic sport and Christine placed 5th for team Canada. She is married and teaches physical education at a Calgary high school.
 
Coaches  
Sally Elizabeth Kemp Born September 15, 1939, Montreal, Quebec. She earned her B.A. at Sir George Williams University, Montreal and then earned her Master’s degree in physical education at the State University of New York in Cortland, New York, U.S.A. Like many physical education teachers Sally excelled in high school sports playing basketball and hockey. She coached women’s basketball, volleyball, and badminton at Sir George Williams University from 1965 through 1968 before moving Waterloo and coaching basketball and volleyball and conducting leadership camps at the YM-YWCA. She has served as president of the Ontario Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Association and has also served as with the Waterloo Regional Sports Council. The Sally Kemp Award is presented to the Outstanding Female Athlete at Concordia University. Source: Bob Ferguson Who’s Who in Sport. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1977)
 
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