Writers

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Authors    
Susan Louise Moir Allison Born August 18, 1845, Ceylon. Died February 1, 1937, Vancouver, British Columbia. After her father’s death his widow  and 3 children relocated to England. In 1857 the mother married Thomas Glennie and by 1900 the family was living in British Columbia. By 1864 the father abandoned the family in Hope, British Columbia. Here Susan established the 1st school in the town. In 1868 she married John Fall Allison one of the founders of Princeton, British Columbia. The couple had 14 children who they raised in the Similkamun Valley. Susan and her family formed close relations with the Aboriginal population of the area and she learned their stories and translated them to English. She was the 1st European to report sighting the Naitaka (Opopogo), a large serpent like legend of Lake Okanagan. In 1891 the British Association for the Advancement of Science published Susan’s paper on the peoples of Similkameen. In 1900 she published a long narrative poem In-cow-mad-ket, a story of a local native Chief. She retired to Vancouver in 1928 publishing part of her memoirs in 1931 in the Province newspaper. Her complete memoirs were published by the University of British Columbia in 1976. This publication gives the only British Columbian woman’s account of early settlement in the area. On September 4, 2010 she was declared a National Historic Person. Source: Susan Louisa Moir Allison Backgrounder. Parks Canada Online (Accessed July 2014)
Mary Alloway. (née Dworkin) Born Winnipeg, Manitoba December 3, 1917. Her first career was as a social worker before she became an educator, writer, and editor.  She has written poetry and short fiction.  She is a specialist on the subject of A.M. Klein. In 1998 she was the Canada Council exchange poet in Wales.
Félicité Angers Born La Malbaie, Quebec January 9, 1845. Died June 6, 1924. This was the pen name of Laure Conan, author of nine novels of French Canadian Life. She was a witness to her time. She was the first French Canadian female novelist. All her novels centered on the 3 driving forces of French Canadian life, family, nation, and religion.
Jeanette Armstrong Born British Columbia 1948. She originally studied fine arts at Okanogan College and the University of Victoria. Her current career is being director of the En'owkin Cultural Centre, a cultural and educational organization operated by the Okanogan Nation. Her writings serve the purpose to educate young people about aboriginal history and culture. Her published works have earned the Mungo Martin Award in 1974 and the Helen Pitt Memorial Award in 1978.
Margaret Eleanor Atwood Born Ottawa, Ontario November 18, 1939. "Peggy" is a poet, novelist, editor and critic is one of Canada's major contemporary authors. She has written novels, television scripts, short stories, children's books many of which have won awards locally, nationally and internationally. Her works have won the Governor General's Award for Literature, the Giller Prize, the Los Angeles Times Prize just to name a few! She has also edited such monumental tomes as the Oxford Book of Canadian Poetry. She has an active interest in Amnesty International. Recognition of her career have been way to numerous to list in one paragraph. The variety of awards runs from MS Magazine Woman of the Year 1986 to being a Companion in the Order of Canada. Check out the online edition for the Canadian Encyclopedia for complete listings of her works and her awards.
Constance Barbara Backhouse Born Winnipeg, Manitoba February 19, 1952. She studied for her B.A. at the University of Manitoba and took Law at Osgoode Hall Law School and took her masters LL.M at Harvard Law School in the U.S.A. Since 1984 she has bee a professor of Law at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. Her legal specialty is women and the law. She is interested in women and the law in history and is an considered an expert in the field of gender issues and sexual harassment. Some of the books she has written are considered basic reading for women's study programs across the country. Some of the titles she has written are: The Secret oppression: Sexual harassment of working women (1979); Sexual Harassment on the Job (1981) Petticoats and Prejudice: women and the law in nineteenth century Canada (1991) and Colour coded: a legal history of racism in Canada 1900-1950 (Toronto, 1999)
Helga Steinvor Baldvinsdotir


Undine

Born June 1, 1855 Litla Aszeirsa Iceland. Died October 23, 1941. She came to Canada with her parents in 1873. The first settled in Ontario where she married Jakob Jonatonsson Lindal. The couple had two children. She had written poetry in Iceland but it was not until she came to Canada would she have any of her work published. He writings reflected her life story, writing of leaving her homeland and lamenting that in Canada women’s rights often meant women remained in a bad marriage. She became divorced in 1892. She moved to Manitoba and later to British Columbia with her second husband Skuli Arni Stefansson Freeman with whom she had another child. Skuli died in 1904. She published using the pen name Undine. Her works were published in Freyja, an early suffrage journal . While she did put her poems together in a manuscript they were not published until 1952, 11 years after her death. Sources: Herstory: A Canadian Women’s Calendar 2006. Saskatoon: Coteau Books, 2005: Writings by Western Icelandic Women by Kristen Wolf. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 1997.

Joyce Carmen Barkhouse (née Killam)  Born May 3, 1913, Woodville, Nova Scotia. Died February 2, 2012, Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. While as a youth she dreamed of being a missionary she took the reality check of becoming a teachers. She attended the Truro Normal Collage (Teacher’s College) in 1932. She encouraged all her students , even her niece, Margaret Atwood. She often wrote short stories, poems and plays for her students to provide Canadian content and context that was missing from regular school provided textbooks. In 1942 she married Milton Joseph Barkhouse (   - 1968) and took time from her teaching and writing to raise her two children. In 1974 she published her first book: George Dawson: the Little Giant. In 1980 she collaborated with Margaret Atwood for the book Anna’s Pet. Her work, The Pit Pony won the Ann Connor Brimer Award in Children’s Literature. This story went on to win a Gemini Award when produced as a CBC TV film and later was redone as a min series for TV. She was a member of the Writer’s Federation of Nova Scotia, The writer’s Union of Canada, and the Canadian Society of Children’s Authors, Illustrators and performers. She was inaugurated into the Order of Nova Scotia in 2007 and the Order of Canada in 2009. Source: “Author of Pit Pony turned to writing late in life.” by Sandra Martin, Globe and Mail, February 4, 2012.
Nancy Bauer Born Massachusetts, U.S.A. 1934. An author who married a Canadian and moved to New Brunswick to raise her family of two sons and one daughter. She was the publisher of 25 New Brunswick chap books. She founded the Maritime Writers Workshop. She has been writer in residence at the University of New Brunswick, The Cape Code Writers Conference, and Bemidji State University in Michigan, U.S.A. She writes article about craftspeople, visual artists and writers for various Canadian Maritime magazines. She has written several novels and has won the Alden Nowlan Award for Excellence in the Literary Arts in 1999.
Jessie Louise Beattie    Born Blair, Ontario October 2, 1896. Died Hamilton, Ontario, October 5, 1985. She published her first poem when she was just 15years old. She continued her writing under the name, Rainbow Bright. After high school she worked in libraries in Kitchener, Ontario, Hamilton, Ontario and Buffalo, New York, U.S.A. By 1928 she had returned home to care for her aging parents. She also tutored neighboring children and obtained a special license to teach from the Province of Ontario. In 1929, and 1931 Ryerson Press published books of her poems and her first novel, Hill Top appeared in 1935. These early works would be followed by some 20 books, three plays and an operetta. In an attempt to raise funds for library books, Jessie wrote and produced a play that soon found her travelling throughout Ontario to help produce school plays  in various towns as a representative of the Ontario Welfare Council. From 1937-1939 she was a “House Mother” at Coronation Cottage at the Ontario Training School for Girls in Galt. World War ll found her working at the Vancouver Public Library in British Columbia. She married David Griffin and the couple settled in Hamilton, Ontario where she continued writing even though her sight was greatly weakened. In 1995 she was inducted into the City of Cambridge (Ontario) Hall of Fame. Source: Jessie Louise Beattie, City of Cambridge Hall of Fame. Online Accessed January 2013)
Elizabeth Speed Beaven (née Frowd)  Born Summerside, England Died September 14, 1871.The wife of the Rev. James Beaven, a practicing minister and professor of divinity in King's College in Toronto. Her husband was a writer and no doubt the absence of materials for young ladies prompter her to write her own book called "Devotions for School girls" [Toronto : n.d.] In the 1840's her husband would write of visits to Indian Missions in the Canadas. Perhaps she had traveled with him on these ventures.
Emily Elizabeth Beaven

(née Shaw). Born Belfast, Ireland Died August 6, 1897. She and her family would sail with their sea faring father to New Brunswick in 1836. June, two years later she married Frederick William Cadwallader Beavan, a surgeon in the militia. Three of their family of seven children would be born in Canada. She enjoyed writing and her poetry and stories appeared in the Armaranth, the first magazine of New Brunswick. Her works appeared with the signature style of the day as wither Mrs. B or as Emily B.. In 1843 the family sailed to settle in England. However the life in the Canadian province stayed with Emily and in 1845 she published Sketches and tales illustrative of the life in the backwoods’ of New Brunswick, North America. She intended the work to be a handbook of prospective settlers. She even detailed the effect of weather on a woman’s skin. Today the work is studied by  students as a valuable historic profile of her times in the colony.  In 1852 the Beavan family sailed for Melbourne to finally settle in Australia. Sources: Dictionary of Canadian Biography V. VII pg 792 ; A celebration of women writers http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/beaven/beaven.html  Accessed April 2008

Andrea Beck Born Montreal, Quebec October 25, 1956. As a child living in small town Quebec she enjoyed the freedom of a vivid imagination and the outdoors. Her mother took the family to live in Montreal when Andrea was 11 and she was not impressed with the city. She attended Dawson College taking art and then went to Toronto to attend the Ontario College of Art. Later she would attend York University for her Bachelor degree and the University of Toronto for her masters degree in social Work. Although she works as a registered Clinical Consultant her imagination and love of drawing could not be shelved. She actually founded a toy business making stuffed animals like moose and beavers. It would be here that the embryo of the character for children’s stories Elliot Moose would become part of Andrea’s life. She began writing stories and when Elliot was sent to the Kids Can Press he was an instant success with the publisher and with readers. Elliot even has his own TV show! IN 2003 she was forced to rest and recuperate from two minor automobile accidents. By 2007 she was back to writing and drawing and Pierre le Poof, a poodle dog with an attitude came alive and also very popular with the young readers. Andrea has enjoyed traveling to such places as the rainforest in Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe England and Russia making her travels a fertile ground to be background for stores. Andrea has two sons and lives in Unionville, Ontario, just east of Toronto. Sources: Andre Beck.com ; Andrea Beck by Dave Jenkinson, Canadian Magazine online accessed January 2007.            
Lily Adams Beck (née Moresby) Born 1862(?) Died January 3, 1931. She traveled to Asia and the Orient but did not begin to write until 1919 and was first published in 1922. She wrote under several pen names and became well known under all the names she used: E. Barrington; Eliza Louisa Beck; and L (Louis) Moresby. During her career she would write almost thirty books published in Toronto, Boston, New York and London. Many of her books were set in the Orient.
Ethel Mary Bennett

(née Granger). Born Shorten, Dorsetshire, England 1891. Died April 19, 1988. She and her family immigrated to Canada when she was an infant. Settling in Collinwood, Ontario, young Ethel was writing for the Collingwood Bulletin while still in school. She would attend the University of Toronto . Graduating in 1915 she taught at the Ontario Ladies College in Whitby, Ontario before she married in 1919 and moved to teach in Pennsylvania. She earned her PhD at the  University of Wisconsin and Lectured in French in Victoria during the 1940’s.  In the late 1950’s she published three historical novels featuring women in New France. She won the Ryerson Fiction Award in 1960 for her work Short of Glory.  She also penned stories for Children for Discovery Magazine.

Jehane Benoit. (née Patenaude) Born March 21, 1904. Died November 24, 1987.   This food consultant turned to TV as a medium to explain Canadian cuisine to her home and native land.  She also published some 30 books to generate interest in her field. She studied at the Cordon Bleu and held a degree as a food chemist from the Sorbonne in France. She opened a cooking school in Montreal.  In 1973 she became an Officer of the Order of Canada.
Clare Bernhardt

Born June 18, 1911 Preston, Ontario. Died May 1, 1993 Kitchener, Ontario. Clare became wheelchair bound after a had polio when she was only 11. She was unable to attend high school because of lack of accessibility but she educated herself by reading. At 17 she had an article published in the magazine Girlhood Days. She would go on to write book reviews for the local newspaper the Prestonian. She wrote poems that were published in various magazines including the Ladies Home Journal and the Toronto Star Weekly. During World War ll she wrote a column for the Canadian Red Cross and was a correspondent for the Kitchener –Waterloo Record. Along with her short stories that were published she wrote two novels and a play. Miss Bernhardt wrote the lyrics for the Canadian Centennial year hymn that was provided to churches across the country in 1967. Foe 30 years she would write a column for her local paper about the world from her point of view. In 1991 she was inducted into the Order of Ontario. Source: Hall of Fame, City of Cambridge, Ontario Online Accessed March 2013.

Constance Bersford-Howe. Born November 10, 1922. A novelist she produced seven novels. "The Book of Eve" was adapted to a stage plan and was produced at the Stratford Festival in 1977.
Frances Marion Beynon

 

First Woman

Born 1884 Streetsville, Ontario, Died Winnipeg, Manitoba  October 5, 1951 She moved with her family to Manitoba in 1889, settling in the Hartney district on a family farm.  Like her siblings, Beynon earned a teaching certificate. She taught near Carman before moving to Winnipeg in 1908 to work in the T. Eaton Company’s advertising department. She was an active member of the Quill Club. In 1912 she became the first full-time women’s editor of the Grain Growers’ Guide, holding the post until 1917. She and her sister Lillian fought for a variety of women’s issues, including suffrage, dower legislation, and homesteading rights for women, but she lost much public credibility when she began to criticize the war. She left Manitoba in 1917 for the United States, where she wrote a semi-autobiographical novel, Aleta Day, and continued her journalistic work. Sources: Francis Marion Beynon: The Forgotten Suffragist by Brie McManus Manitoba History, Number 28, Autumn 1994 : Who’s Who in Western Canada: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of Western Canada, Volume 1, 1911. C. W. Parker, editor. Canadian Press Association, Vancouver. : Dictionary of Manitoba Biography, by J. M. Bumsted (University of Manitoba Press, 1999)
Sandra Louise Birdsell (née Bartlette) Born Hamiota, Manitoba 1942. An award winning novelist she has won the 1984 Gerald Lampert Award for Night Travelers. In 1990 the Missing Child won the Books in Canada First Novel Award. She has also been nominated more than once for the Governor General's Award. by 2004 she had published 8 books in total.
Marie-Claire Blais.

Born October 5, 1939, Quebec City, Quebec.  She attended Laval University were friends encouraged her to become a writer. At 20 in 1959 she published her 1st novel Labelle Bete, in English translation, the Mad Shadow. Since then there have been some 20 novels, several plays, as well as published collections of poetry. In 1963 she moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. where she met her life partner, Artist Mary Meigs. The couple lived in France for awhile before settling in Montreal. Her books have been translated into English, Italian and even Chinese. Her works have garnered her a multitude of awards from both Canada and abroad. In 1965 there was the Prix France, Canada followed in 1968 with the 1st of several Governor’s General Awards (1979, 1996, 2001, 2005, and 2008). There is also the W.O. Mitchell Award in 2000, the Prix Prince Pierre de Monaco and in 2006 Matt Cohen Prize . In 1972 she was inducted in to the Order of Canada and she also has been inducted into the Ordre National du Quebec. From France she is a Chevalier in the Ordre of Lettres. In 1995/96 she was the International Woman of the Year awarded by the International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Source: Canadian Encyclopedia Online (Accessed February 2014)

Victoria Grace Blackburn Born Quebec City, Quebec. Died March 4, 1928. Her father, Josiah Blackburn, was editor and proprietor of the London Free Press in London, Ontario. Perhaps it was he who encouraged his daughter to become a journalist. Her works were written under the pen name of "Fanfan." Her only novel "The Manchild" would be published in 1930 after her death.
Patricia Jenkins Blondal Born 1926 Souris, Manitoba. Died 1959.  She moved to Winnipeg with her family in the 1930s and attended the University of Manitoba from 1944 to 1947. Patricia worked as a broadcaster for the CBC and later moved to Montreal and began writing professionally in 1955. Her book From Heaven with a Shout was published in 1963 and serialized in Chatelaine magazine. Her most critically acclaimed work, A Candle to Light the Sun, was published posthumously in 1960. Sources: Dictionary of Manitoba Biography by J. M. Bumsted  (University of Manitoba Press, 1999) : Memorable Manitobans Online (Accessed December 2011)
Jo Ellen Bogart Born Houston, Texas, U.S.A. October 20, 1945. She moved to Canada as an adult in 1975 and she began to consider a career as a writer. By the mid 1980's she had several prepared manuscripts to present to a publisher. Animals in the form a  coatimundi, and Argentine desert tortoise, and Africa Clawed frog, Alvin the chipmunk, several mice gerbils and guinea pigs have been a part of her home menagerie over the years. To write a book about a Blue Macaw was a natural stretch for this author. For her as an author there is sheer enjoyment in making something up and kicking the story. The next best thing is having other people enjoying what she has written as a poem or a story.
Alice Boissoneau

(nee Eedy) Born Walkerton, Ontario, 1918. Died 2007. She earned her B.A. from Victoria College, University of Toronto, in 1939. While working as a hospital social worker in Toronto and Vancouver she wrote short stories that appeared in various magazines such as: Canadian Forum, Alphabet and Exile: A Literary Quarterly. She also wrote for the Anthology series on CBC radio. After marrying Arthur Boissonneau, a specialist in forestry, Alice began writing fiction in the isolation of northern Ontario. The novel Eileen McCullough was short listed in 1977 for the W.H. Smith/Books in Canada First Novel Award, and was followed by A Sudden Brightness (1994). The memoir There Will Be Gardens was published in 1991. Sources: Yvonne McKague Hauser Collection. E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. Suggestion submitted by Jeanne Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.

Evelyn Bolduc Born St Victor de Beauce, Quebec July 8, 1888. Died December 22, 1939. Her main career was working as a translator for the Canadian Senate in Ottawa. She would establish herself by writing Manuel de l'Equette ( Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1937)
Melvina Marjorie Bolus Born 1906 Fox Bay, Falkland Islands. Died 1997, Victoria, British Columbia.  When she was a child the family moved to England. And in 1926 to Ottawa.. Bolus held several secretarial positions at the House of Commons in Ottawa from 1928 to 1939, most notably as personal secretary to Canada's first female M.P., Agnes Macphail, from 1928 to 1936. Bolus returned to London, where she worked until 1944 as personal assistant to the senior officer at the Canadian Military Headquarters. She also  held various positions with the American government, working in New York and Washington, D.C. Returning to Ottawa in 1946,  she worked for the Canadian Geographical Society, becoming assistant editor of the "Canadian Geographical Journal" in 1948.She wrote of Image of Canada  (Ryerson Press, 1953). She  moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1956 to become assistant editor of the Hudson Bay Company Beaver, and then its editor from 1958 to 1972. She widened the scope of the magazine beyond its historical focus, introducing such subjects as art, nature and archaeology. Awards during her life, included the Canadian Historical Association's Order of Merit, the Alberta Historical Association Award, the Washington State Historical Society's Captain Robert Gray Medal and the American Association of State and Local History Award of Merit. In 1970, she received the Medal of Service of the Order of Canada was awarded a Manitoba Centennial Medal by the Manitoba Historical Society. She retired to Victoria, British Columbia. Sources: Archives of Manitoba. Fonds of Malvina M. Bolus. Online (Accessed December 2011) ; Memorable Manitobans Online. (Accessed December 2011)
Paulette Bourgeois Born Winnipeg, Manitoba July 20, 1951. If you have read any children's stories about a shy turtle called Franklin then you are familiar with the work of Paulette Bourgeois. While she often takes ideas for her books from her own life experiences she admits that she never had a pet turtle! She also likes to write information books for young readers like ; The Amazing Apple Book , The Amazing Paper Book, or The Moon.
Gail Bowen. Born Toronto, Ontario September 22, 1942. The author of several novels, she has set her mystery stories in the province of Saskatchewan. Maybe you will read of the adventures of the character Joanne Kilbourn, an amateur sleuth who also is the mother of three teenagers. Sound like good stories don't they? Check you library to see if you can borrow these books.
Marilyn Bowering Born Winnipeg, Manitoba 1949. A Canadian novelist and poet she has had her works nominated for the Governor General's Awards in literature. In 1996 her Autobiography was the winner of the Pat Lowther Award which is presented annually for the best published work of poetry by a Canadian woman.
Karleen Bradford . Born Toronto, Ontario December 16, 1936. She says that she has loved to write since she was old enough to hold a pencil and put it to paper! Her family moved to Argentina when she was only seven. This began her understanding of living in the world. She came back to Canada to study at the University of Toronto and met her husband Jim Creighton. The young couple would spend the next 34 years living at various international postings with the Canadian Foreign Services. They have three children.  In the early days of the postings wives of foreign officers could not hold jobs outside the home so she turned her love of writing into producing books for youth. Hers writings have been listed for recommended reading by the Ontario Library Association, and the Canadian Library Association have not only  short listed her works but in 1993 she won the Young Adult Canadian Book Awards which is just one of many writings awards. Karleen has also found time to contribute to her profession by holding positions at organizations such as the Canadian Author’s association, and the Public Lending Rights Commission. In 1990 she was awarded the Max and Greta Ebel Award for her work Windward Island. Check the shelves of any Canadian Public Library and you will find some of her books to enjoy.
Dionne Brand Born Trinidad 1953. Dionne cam to Canada to study at the University of Toronto. A poet, novelist and non-fiction writer she focuses on issues relating to Black women. She is an active fighter for the rights of marginalized communities, especially blacks and women. Land to Light On won the 1997 Governor General's Award for poetry.
Sheila Branford. Born May 11, 918. An author she is perhaps best known for her novel about animals called the INCREDIBLE JOURNEY. The book was an immediate international best seller and in 1963 it became a Walt Disney movie. It is a great story about 3 friends, a bull terrier, a golden Labrador and a Siamese cat who travel over 300 km through northern Ontario wilderness to return home.  It will be available to borrow from your local library.
Leah Bradshaw Born Sherbrooke, Quebec June 25 1954. This author is a professor of Political Sconces at Brock University in St Catherines, Ontario. She did her studies at bishop's University, York University where she received her PHD in 1984. She has written a book that won the Gelber Award in International relations and the Choice Award from the U.S. She is a working mother with three children to keep her in line at home.
Hélène Brodeur. Born July 13, 1923. After university she married would become mother of five children. Like many of here generation she turned first to teaching and then became a successful civil servant. Through all of this  her desire to write remained strong. She has published works in both English and French . She has earned the Prix Champlain, Prix du Nouvel-Ont. and Prix due Droit. In 1983 she wrote the the TV script Les Ontariens. ( 1997).
Frances Brooke (née Moore) Born England 1745. Died 1789. Wife of the Reverend John Brooke, onetime garrison chaplain at Quebec she joined her husband in Canada in 1764 for four years. She wrote what may be described as the first Canadian novel, "The History of Emily Montague ( 4 volumes, London 1769, reprinted in 1931). She was also a playwright, essayist, librettist, and stage director. She was well known in the London literary and theatrical circles.
Cassie Eileen Brown (née Horwood) Born Rose Blanche, Newfoundland 1919. Died 1986. She began writing as a teenager and later worked as a freelance writer of scripts and educational broadcasts for the CBC.  She wrote articles for various publications, short stories and participated in radio dramatizations. In the 1950's her work received five awards through the Newfoundland and Labrador Arts and Letter Competition. From 1959-1966 she was a reporter for the Daily News and she also published and edited the magazine Newfoundland Women (1961-1964). She retired from the Daily News to work on her book Death on the Ice (1972) , a gripping account of the 1914 sealing disaster . She went on to write two additional books.
Lois Brown Lois is a journalist and has worked many years in corporate communications. Lois has lived in Maputo, Mozambique as an international volunteer during the struggle against apartheid. She has travelled throughout the United Kingdom and Europe during the 1970’s and as well has experienced extended stays in Mexico and Costa Rica.  In 1992 she published :Girls of Summer: In their own League (Harper Collins). She maintains a web site with the same name as the book, which updates research concerning members of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. She has written several novels, one of which, Murder in the Clubhouse, is set in the shadow of the early days of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. In 2009 Lois was once again an international volunteer, this time in Northern India and Pokhara, Nepal. Source: The Girls of Summer by Lois Brown (Accessed February 2014)
Margaret Helen Brown

Born Tiverton, Ontario 1887. Died 1978. After graduating high school in 1905 she attended Normal School (Teacher’s College) and then joined a cousin at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario. The two would graduate in 1912. Together the cousins had joined the Student Volunteers, a Christian youth movement and took extra courses in religion. They were cleared for mission work by the Women’s Missionary Society of the Methodist (now United Church of Canada) and prepared to sail for China. Margaret would return to school during furloughs. In 1928 she attended the Ontario College of Education in Toronto and in 1935 she earned a masters degree in Chinese Studies. Although she began a doctoral program at Columbia University, New York, U.S.A. she never completed her degree. In July 1913 she left Canada going to China beginning a 38 year career of serving the call to mission in China. She serving in the Hwaiking she was instrumental in opening the 1st full primary school for girls in the city as well as a school for young married women. During her 3rd term in China she became an editor of the Christian Literature Society and later she worked as a translator for the Canadian Commissioner of Trade. Her sill in the Chinese language even permitted her to write books in the language! During the Japanese military activities in China in the late 1930’s she worked from Hon Kong under the British Consulate and although there were intervals in China once Communism took over China foreign missionaries were not allowed on the mainland. Her personal writings and those published have left a view of Christian Mission efforts in a changing Chin., an area of history that is just being studied. She retired home to Canada in 1956. Sources: From the pages of three ladies: Canadian women missionaries in Republican China. By Deborah Shulman (MA Thesis, Concordia University, 1996) ;

Margaret Buffie Born Winnipeg, Manitoba March 29, 1945. For this author who writes books for young readers, her inspiration often comes from happenings in her own life. She has lots of ides for books and stories and often wishes she was more than one person so she could put all of her ideas into her computer. She suggests that aspiring young writers keep a combination diary sketchbook to collect information and pictures which could be used for writing a book. Margaret won the Vicky Metcalf Award in 1996. This award is presented to authors who have written more than 4 books which young readers find an inspiration.
Bonnie Burnad Born January 15, 1945. This mother of three is a teacher and guest lecturer. She has toured South Africa, Sweden, Germany and England. To date, for her short stories, she has been awarded the Commonwealth Best First Book Award (1989),  Saskatchewan Book of the Year Award (1994), the Marian Engel Award (1994) and the Giller Award(1999). 
Grace MacLennan Grant Campbell Born Williamstown, Ontario March 18, 1895. Died May 31, 1963. After graduating with a B.A. from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 1915 she chose a career in teaching. She would also practice her avocation of writing. She had article and short stories published in several Canadian magazines. Her novels, published mainly in the 1940's , included The Thorn Apple Tree (Toronto, 1942). Fresh Wind Blowing (Toronto, 1947) and The Tower in the Town (Toronto, 1950).
Janet Carnochan Born Stamford, Canada West (Ontario November 14, 1839. Died March 31, 1926. She was a teacher who loved history. She was a tireless worker for the Niagara-on-the-Lake Historical Society in Ontario. She wrote several local church histories in the late 1890's and is the author of History of Niagara (Toronto, 1914)
Lydia Campbell (née Brooks). Born Hamilton Inlet, Labrador November 1, 1818. Died April 1905. One of the children of an English settler and his Inuit wife, she lived her entire life in her native Labrador. As an old woman , a journalist  , Arthur Charles Waghorn, sent her a journal and asked her to write down memories of Labrador life and ways. In 1894-1895 13 installments of her writings appeared in the St John's Evening Herald in Newfoundland. Her reflections went beyond the personal and provided a first hand account to life and lore of her home territory. Lydia had married twice and was the mother of 13 children. It is thanks to her sharing her life memories and knowledge that information of nineteenth century Labrador has a written record.
Bertha Carr-Harris (née Wright) Born 1863. Died November 22, 1949. As an author she would write three main works; White Chief of the Ottawa, (Toronto, 1903); The Hieroglyphics of the Heavens (Toronto, 1933); Love's immensity (Pickering, 1935).
Anne Laurel Carter Born Don Mills, Ontario September 1953. As a child she had wanted to be an actor but was much too shy. She entered the study of medicine at the University of Toronto but dropped out and headed for Israel where she lived and worked on a Kibbutz, a community farm. She married and the young couple moved to California and finally settled in Toronto. Back home she earned her BA at York University in 1975 and continued to worked to earn her Masters in education at the Ontario Institute of Education. In the 1980’s she was teaching Cree children in Northern Quebec. Her 1st novel In the Clear was about a youth with polio was published in 1984. She remarried and settled once again in Toronto and worked as a teacher-librarian. She has written numerous books, with Last Chance Boy winning the Book of the Year award from the Canadian Library Association and Under a Prairie Sky winning the Mr. Christie’s Book Award. She has also written for the series Our Canadian Girl. Source: Anne Laurel Carter official web site (Accessed November 2012.)
Gillian Chan Born 1954, England. After secondary school, Gillian worked at various places including a bank and restaurants. By the mid 1970’s she decided to study to become a teacher and by 1980 she had earned a degree in English and Education. In 1982 she married Henry Chan and the couple had one son. She taught for 10 years prior to immigrating to Canada and settling in Dundas, Ontario. In 1991 she took a course on writing short stories. Later she met the editor of Kids Can Press where she would publish her first book Golden Girl and Other Stories. More books soon followed in 1996, 2001, , 2002, 2004 and 2005. She then took some time from writing to care for her son until he went to school. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the War of 1812 she published I am Canada: a call to battle about the war. The book was the winner of the Ontario South Library Association White Pine Award and the Nautilus Award for Best Young Adult Book.
Alice Amelia Chown Born Kingston, Ontario February 3, 1866. Died March 2, 1949. Educated at Queen's University she graduated in 1887. She became an active suffragist and was also know as a promoter of unions. She lent her support to the League of Nations. She wrote her autobiography The Stairway (Boston, 1921).
Annie Rothwell Christie (née Fowler) Born London, England March 31, 1837 Died July 2, 1927. She came to Canada as a young child with her family and settled on Amherst Island near Kingston, Ontario. Her father was a respected landscape artist. Married and widowed while young she married a second time the the Reverend I. J. Christie and settled in the North Gower, Ontario with her second husband.  She is know for her short stories and her novels which appeared first as magazine sequels. Recognition as a poet was earned when some of her poetry was turned into songs used in "The half breed rebellions"
Elizabeth Anne Cleaver (née Mrazik). Born Montreal, Quebec November 19, 1939. Died 1985. An illustrator and author, Elizabeth was most concerned with myths and legends. She obtained several awards for her works including the Frances Howard-Gibbon Award in 1978 and the International Board on Books for Young People's Hans Christian Andersen award in 1882. Maybe you have seen her work “The Loon’s Necklace” or the “The Enchanted Caribou” which is an Inuit legend illustrated with shadow puppets?
Eleanor Coerr

Born May 29, 1922 Kamsack, Saskatchewan. Died California November 22, 2010. One of her best friends in school was daughter of Japanese immigrants and Eleanor learned to enjoy origami and Japanese food. She married  a U.S. Air Force office but retained her independence. In 1949 she was the only person who applied to the Ottawa Journal newspaper to be a foreign correspondent to describe conditions in postwar Japan. Since there were no civilian ships nor planes to Japan at that time she sail on A Dutch freighter o take up her new job. She lived with a Japanese farm family in the middle of nowhere prior to moving to Hiroshima. The she was unprepared for the devastation she saw. In the 1950’s she became o mother to two sons , one born in Japan and the second in Alabama. She continued her writing while traveling to postings with her husband in California, The Philippines and Taiwan. Returning to Hiroshima, Japan in 1963 she was enthralled and mesmerized with the beautiful Pease Park with the statue with a young girl at the top. The monies to build the park had been raised in part by selling the story of the youth on the statue, Sadako. Eventually Eleanor found a copy of the story of the youth Sadako and the book Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes was published in 1977. The book spawned web sites, lesson plans and popularized origami. The story inspired works of music, theatre and ballet. As Eleanor entered her second marriage to Wymberly de Renne Coerr (1913-1996), the couple traveled as diplomats and she earned her B.A. in English from American University and a Masters of Library Science from the University of Maryland. She went on to publish several dozen books for youth including biographies, easy to read adventure tales, and sensitive accounts of children from other cultures. Sources: “Eleanor Coerr…”.School Library Journal November 30, 2010 ; Ewing-Weisz, Chris “Visits to Hiroshima prompted a book promoting peace” The Globe and Mail  October 21, 2011 Page R 9 . Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa

Evelyn "Lyn" Margaret Cook Evelyn Margaret Cook Waddell. Born May 4, 1918. In 1940 she earned a scholarship to attend the University of Toronto. She continued her studies with post graduate work in Library Science at the University of Toronto. In 1946 she used her grandmother’s name Margaret Culverhouse to publish a poem in the June 1946 issue of the Canadian Poetry Magazine. She worked at eh Toronto Public Library for a year an then joined the RCAF – Women’s Division in the Meteorological Service for three years. She also organized a library at the Military base in Trenton, Ontario. She served as the 1st Children’s Librarian at the Sudbury Public Library. Her 1st book, Bells on Finland Street appeared after the World War II and she became one of the first writer for children to be published after the war. Her books, written for the youth market, took place in Canadian places and often told the story of the Canadian multicultural scene. It has been said that she literarily developed the prototype of the hyphenated Canadian ( i.e. Finnish-Canadian) While in Sudbury she developed a ½ hour CBC radio show  A Doorway to Fairland” and was a regular asset to CBC Radio in the 1940’s and 1950’s with the show also being picked up in the U.S.A. She created the Radio show Sounds Fun and wrote plots for Uncle Chichimus puppet show. Moving to Scarborough, Ontario in the 1960 she told stories at the Bendale Branch of the local Library. In 1965 she wrote the Brownie’s Handbook for Girl Guides of Canada. As a Canadian Centennial project in 1967 she adapted her book Samantha’s Secret Room for National School telecast as a Television series. Among the many awards accumulated by her more than 12 books was the 1978 Vicky Metcalf Award for contribution to Children’s Literature. . Sources: “Lyn Cook” by Ruth Maydan in Profiles, Canadian Library Association, 1971. ; Creating the National Mosaic. Multiculturalism in Canadian Children’s Literature 1950-1994 by Miriam Verena Rihter.
Monique Correveau Born September 26, 1927, Québec. Died June 24, 1976, Québec. Monique attended the University of Toronto in 1946 and Université Laval in 1948. She would return to Laval for additional studies in 1969 and 1974. Married Monique became the mother of 10 children and she wrote and dedicated a book for young readers to each of her children.  More of her books were published posthumously in 1980 and 1985. In 1958 and again in 1966 she wan the Prix de l’A.C.E.L.F. , Association canadienne des éducateurs de langue française. In 1966 she earned the Prix Marie Rollet, Médaille de l’Association de bibliothèquaires du Canada and from the same association in 1976 Prix Alvine-Bélisle. In 1967 she received the Canadian Centennial Commission Award/Prix de la Commission du centenaire du Canada. In 1971 she was presented with the Prix Michelle-Le Normand of the Société des écrivains canadiens.  The library of Eglise Saint Denys-du-plateau is named in her honour as is the Public Library in Sainte Foy Québec. Source: “Monique Corriveau”: Profiles, Canadian Library Association, 1971.
Luella Saunders Creighton

(née Bruce). Born August 25, 1901. Stouffville, Ontario. She was a teacher in a rural Ontario School from 1920-21. In 1924-1926 she attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto. In 1926 she married Donald Creighton (1902-1977) She enjoyed writing novels and romances and was well known for her work High Bright Buggy Wheels (McClelland & Stewart, 1951) which drew from Mennonite history in the Markham area of Ontario. 6 additional works followed each drawing on settings in Canadian History. She was supported in her writing by her husband, Donald Creighton,(1902-1979) a well known and respected Canadian Historian who died in 1979. Source: Canadian Women of Note (Toronto, Canadian Women’s Press Club/York University, 1994) no. 193 page 201.

Constance Elvia Crook. Born September 29, 1930. This retired teacher and grandmother is perhaps best known by her pen name : Connie Brummel Crook. She has written Laura's Choice (1993), Nellie L (1994) and Meyers Creek (1995). Be sure to have a look at her books at your local Public Library.
Annie Charlotte Dalton (née Armitage) Born Birkkby, England December 9. Died January 12, 1938. She would immigrate to Canada with her husband in 1904. She began publishing her works in 1910 and publish some 8 volumes through to 1935. She was well known and respected as a novelist in her own era spanning some thirty years.
Paule Clouthier-Daveluy

Born April 6, 1919 (Sometimes recorded as April 5), Quebec. Paule took Social Services courses at Soeur du bonne conseil. She began working at CKAC Radio station and it was not long until she was editing radio broadcasts. In 1944 she married André Daveluy and the couple would have 6 children. In 1957 she wrote a collection of short stories for youth readers Les Guinoes and continues to write in her beloved French language for young teens. In 1958 she  earned the Concours Littéaire from the Association canadienne des éducateurs de langue française. In 1972 she received the Prix Michelle-Le Normand of the Société des écrivains canadiens.  In 1980 Her works were recognized with a certificate of honor from L ‘Union international pour les livres de jeunesse (International Union for youth books) In 1985 she received the Prix Claude-Aubrey and in 1987 Prix Fleury Mesplet pour l’esemble de son oeuvre de traduction. In 1999 she was inducted into the Order of Quebec/Ordre national du Québec. Source: Paule Clouthier by Marguerite Polnicky in Profiles (Canadian Library Association, 1971)

Mary Agnes Scott Davis (née Scott). Born Quebec City, Quebec December 12, 1863. Died November 19, 1927. She used two successful pen names as a journalist, Amaryillis and the Marchioness. She wrote at the turn of the 1900 for Saturday Night Magazine and she turned "gossip " to pure entertainment and became the toast of the town of Ottawa newspapers and kept readers clamouring for more "intel". . She was a social advocate for welfare children and aboriginals with a keen interest in feminism, all the signs of "the new woman". She married the well to do William P. Davis an gave up her daily journalism, writing only the occasional articles for the Women's Historical Society. After the death of her husband in 1916, she and her two daughters were dependant on family for support and eventually moved to France for less expensive life style. From France she contributed a scattering of writings for the Montréal Star.
Mazo de la Roche Born Newmarket, Ontario January 15, 1897. Died July 12, 1961.  While studying at the Ontario College of Art in 1902 she would publish her first short story in Munsey's Magazine.  She would go on the write for the Atlantic Monthly, the Canadian Magazine and the Women's home Companion. In 1923 she would publish her first novel followed in 1925 with an one act play. In 1927 she won a $10,000.00 award for her novel Jalna.  This novel would be the first of 16 novels about the Whiteoak family. Even the adoption of two children in 1931 did not deter her writing. In 1954-55 the novels were adopted for television by the British Broadcasting Corporation. There was a renewed interest when the CBC TV produced a Jalna series.  However in current times the novels are not on popular reading lists.
 
Dorothy Dearborn (née Ryder) Born July 22, 1927, Saint John, New Brunswick. She began writing as a youth and published a collection of poems in 1950. She is perhaps the 1st city editor for a newspaper in Canada when she worked at the Saint John Times Globe. She went on to write and edit for the Saint John’s TelegraphJournal and the Evening Times-Globe. She also edited the King’s County Record and the Saint John Citizen. As a freelance journalist she has contributed articles to numerous publications including the Atlantic Advocate and the Financial Post. She served as the host of a panel TV show called Check and Double Check for CSJH television. She also has a keen interest in politics which has seen her run twice for a federal seat in Parliament from Fundy Royal Riding and she also ran for a seat in the provincial legislature. Although unsuccessful in her political aspirations she is a successful author having published numerous books devoted to local ghost stories, murders and UFO experiences. Her works are both fiction and nonfiction. She also enjoys writing for youth. She has worked with the Canadian Mental Health Association to establish the 1st school for mentally challenged in Saint John. Dorothy is married to Fred R. Dearborn and the couple have 4 adult children with grandchildren who no doubt will be excited with grandma’s story telling. Source. Fairley, Amanda. ‘Dorothy Dearborn’ in the New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia. Online (Accessed September 2014)
 
Kristen den Hartog Born Deep River, Ontario. Her writings have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She has produced two novels up to 2005, Water Wings (Toronto, 2001) and The Perpetual Ending (Toronto, 2003). She currently lives in Toronto but frequently returns to her beloved Ottawa Valley to re-energize.
Lauraine (Laurie) Diane Dennett. Born  September 29, 1946. This writer drew from her own experiences publishing stories of pilgrimages. She has made walking pilgrimages in France, Spain, Italy and six other countries. All her walking efforts have raised over 200,000 dollars for medical research. She has been the Honourary Director of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. In 1993 she received the Confederation Medal to honour her achievements.
 
Kady MacDonald Denton Born Winnipeg Manitoba July 22, 1942. She is an illustrator and author of books who took the advice of her first editor who told her to have fun! To this day she has 'fun' with her profession. She does take her work very seriously and puts in many hours labouring over each illustration. In 1998 her book, A Child's Treasury of Nursery Rhymes won three top awards including the Governor General's Award.
 
Sandra Ann Djwa Born St. John's, Newfoundland April 16, 1939. This writer, biographer and educator studied at Memorial University in Newfoundland and the University of British Columbia. Dr. Djwa settled to a position of Professor of English at Simon Fraser University in 1980. She had published numerous articles, edited several works, including books of poetry by Canadian poet, E. J. Pratt and has written several biographies of Canadian authors. She is currently working on a biography of a Victorian poet, novelist and artist P. M. Page.
 
Lily Dougall. Born Montreal, Quebec April 16, 1858. Died October 9, 1923. She visited England and in 1900 decided to make it her permanent residence. However, as a novelist and religious writer she set the background for 4 of her novels in her home country of Canada. Her works are carefully structured. She used humor and lively dialog to describe her unusual plots and twists.
 
Ann Douglas

Ann Douglas is an award-winning journalist and the author of some 30 books, many of which have been about baby and child care including: The Mother of All Pregnancy Books, The Mother of All Toddler Books, The Mother of All Parenting Books. She also has an interest in Canadian women’s history and has written Canuck Chicks and Maple Leaf Mamma’s to help others learn more of our women’s heritage.  A parent, educator, lecturer, and mother of four, Ann is currently serving as the honorary Chair of the National Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies 9-Month Club and as a member of the expert advisory group for Invest in Kids.  She recently served as national spokesperson for Sunlight's National Play Day Program and has been featured on a Cheerios box as part of a special "Read the Box" campaign of 2002 and 2005. As past president of the Periodical Writers Association of Canada (PWAC) and  a teacher of  writing courses through Trent University she mentors emerging and established authors.
 

Mary Alice Dawe Downie (née Hunter). Born Alton, Illinois, U.S.A. February 12, 1934. Her Canadian parents moved back to Canada where Mary Alice grew up and graduated from the University of Toronto. While studying she spent much of her time at The Varsity newspaper. In 1959 she married and returned to the U.S.A. to live. It was here that she worked producing films, plays and book reviews. With her young family of two young daughters she moved to Kingston, Ontario, Canada where she still resided today. She has written over a dozen books for young Canadian readers and created the Northern Lights series and the Kids Canada Series. She has won awards from the Canada Council, the Ontario Arts Council and Ontario Heritage, the Laidlaw Foundation, and the Canadian Children's Book Centre "Our Choice" awards for various books.
 
Emma Lorne Duff Born Meaford, Ontario. Died March 31, 1935. She would become a Kindergarten teacher in Toronto in 1888 and showed her love of teaching by remaining in the position for some 25 years. During her retirement from teaching she would write "A Cargo of stories for children" Toronto 1931).
Margaret Iris Duley

Born September 27, 1894, Newfoundland. Died March 22, 1968, Newfoundland.

In 1911 she travelled with her family to England to attend a wedding of an aunt. While there Margaret attended elocution and drama courses at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. With the on slot of World War 1 she returned to Canada. During the war she worked with the Women’s Patriotic Association while her 3 brothers served overseas. During this time she wrote a short story : Mother Boggan about islander’s war efforts. In the 1920’s she was a member of the Women’s Franchise League working towards gaining voting rights for women which were granted in March 1925 to women over 25 years of age. During World War ll she worked with the Women’s Patriotic League and the St John’s Ambulance Corp. Later she did public relations work for the Red Cross writing for newspapers and providing radio interviews. In 1952 she was in England to cover the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth ll. She completed 4 novels and additional short stories all set in Newfoundland. By 1959 Parkinson’s Disease prevented her from continuing to write. Near the entrance to the Memorial University Library and at her former home in St. John’s historic plaques have been erected. In 2007 she was declared a National Historic Person. Source: Margaret Iris Duley Backgrounder. Parks Canada online. (Accessed July 2014)
Dorothy Duncan Born East Orange, New Jersey, United States. Died April 22, 1957. Married to the renouned Canadian author Huh MacLennan ( married 1936) she was a reputed author on her own. She would publish some four works including "Bluenose : a portrait of Nova Scotia (New York, 1942).
Kristyn Dunnion Born August 6, 1969 Kingsville, Ontario. As a child being a novelist was one of the choice careers that was right up there with being a detective or a spy. She always loved reading and studied English at McGill University, Montreal and then went to the University of Guelph for her Master’s degree. It was while at Guelph that she stated to have an interest in children’s literature. Moving to Toronto she decided that she did not want to study for her PhD. She worked and continued taking a variety of courses from tap dancing to writing books for children. She has published three books for young readers: Missing Mathew (2003); Mosh Pit (2004) and Big Big Sky in 2008 all with Red Deer Press. Kristyn also performs creeptastic art as Miss Kitty Galore and plays bass in the all-female metal band Heavy Filth. Source: Profile by Dave Jenkinson. CM Magazine Online (Accessed 2007) ; Kristyn Dunnion web site (accessed January 2011)
Evelyn Durand Born Toronto, Ontario 1870. Died December 5, 1900. She studied for her B.A. at the University of Toronto in 1896. Her written work Elise Le Beau: a dramatic idyll and lyrics and sonnets was published in Toronto in 1921 by her sister Laura.
Edith Eaton Born 1867. Died April 7, 1914. She studied for her B.A. at the University of Toronto in 1896. Her written work Elise Le Beau: a dramatic idyll and lyrics and sonnets was published in Toronto in 1921 by her sister Laura.
Winnifred Eaton

Onoto Watanna

Born Montreal, Quebec 1875. Died April 8, 1954. She was the 8th child of 14 children of a British silk merchant and a Chinese mother, Grace, who had lived with missionaries. Both she and her older sister would take to the art of writing. Winnifred was a writer in many arenas from newspaper articles, magazines and journals, short stories, successful novels ( some of which became plays and movies) cookbooks, and movie scripts. She was 14 when she had her first newspaper article published. At seventeen she left home to wander to Jamaica and New York City. Although she was of Chinese she choose a Japanese pen name Onoto Watanna since Japanese novels were more popular. She married Bernard Babcock but the marriage was short lived. In 1917 she married Frances (Frank) Fournier Reeve and moved to settle to a ranch in Calgary Alberta for a couple of years before she once again had wanderlust ending up in Hollywood and New York once again. In 1932 she returned to her husband in Calgary to basically settle. She took an interest and founded the Little Theatre.  She was the first known writer oa Asian descent to be published in America. Her first novel, Mrs Nomé of Japan was published in Chicago in 1899 and was republished in 1999. Her granddaughter Diane Birchall wrote Onoto Watanna, a biography in 2001.
Matilda Ridout Edgar

 

 

(née Ridout) Born September 29, 1844, Toronto, Ontario. Died September 29, 1910, London, England. She was more than likely educated at home. On September 5, 1865 she married James David Edgar, (1841-1899) a lawyer and author. The couple would raise 9 children. Much of her early marriage was spend dedicated to bringing up their large family. When she was in her 40’s she had her first work published, Ten years of Upper Canada in Peace and War (Toronto: Briggs, 1890). This work , a compilation of information from family correspondence was well received. In 1898 with honors bestowed upon her husband she became Lady Edgar. In 1904 her second book was a biography of Sir Isaac Brock, the British hero of the war of 1812. She was also a philanthropist supporting the Infants’ Home  in Toronto and the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire. She was also active in the Woman’s Art Association of Canada where she served as President in 1899. She was a life member of the National Council of Women and served as President in 1909. Source: Dictionary of Canadian Biography vol. Xlll. Online (Accessed March 2014)

Deborah Ellis. Born Cochrane, Ontario. August 7, 2960. A self declared loner she started writing at 10 or 11 years old.  She has won the Canadian Governor General’s Award, (2002), the Ruth Swartz Award, Sweden’s Peter Pan Prize,  the University of California’s Middle East Book Award, the Jane Addams Peace Award and the Vicky Metcalf Award. Her books give western readers a glimpse into the plight of children in today’s developing countries. As a teen in high school she joined the peace movement and is also a longtime feminist . She pledged the earnings from her Breadwinner Trilogy, published around the world in seventeen languages, more than half a million dollars, to Street Kids International and to Women for Women, an organization for Afghan girls in refugee camps in Pakistan. Book proceeds have also been shared with UNICEF.
Sarah Ellis Born Vancouver, British Columbia. May 19,1952. She wrote novels when she was 12 years old! She too time out to go to school and become a librarian but at 30 found herself on leave from her job to write books again. By 2001 she had published some 10 books. Pic-Up Sticks was the 1991 winner of the Governor Genera's Award. Out of the Blue, 1994 won Mr. Christie's Book Award. She loves to write in her little office in the attic of her house.
Marion Ruth Engel (née Passmore) Born May 24, 1933, Toronto, Ontario. Died February 16, 1985, Toronto, Ontario. She earned her B.A. in Language Studies from McMaster University in 1955. She then moved to Montreal to earn her Master’s degree from McGill University. She taught at McGill for a short while and then at the University of Montana in the U.S.A. In 1960/61 she earned a Rotary Foundation Scholarship to the Université d’Aix-Marseille, France. In 1962 she married radio producer Howard Engle and the couple rasied twins until the marriage ended in divorce in 1975. Her first novel, No Clouds of Glory appeared in 1968. In 1973 she was the 1st chair of the Writer’s Union of Canada. In 1976 she won the Governor General’s Award in Literature for her work Bear. She served as writer in residence a the University of Alberta in 1977 and at the University of Toronto from 1980-1982. In 1981she won the City of Toronto Book Award for Lunatic Villas. In 1982 she was inducted into the Order of Canada. In 1984 she was the  Toronto YWCA Woman of Distinction. The Marion Engle Award is present annually in her honour to a woman writer in mid-career. She was an avid journal keeper and in 1999 her journals were published as Marion Engel’s Notebook. Marion Engel Park is located in Toronto. Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Online (Accessed February 2014) 
Constance May Evans. Born Montreal Quebec March 15, 1888. Died ????.  She studied art and music in London, England with private lessons. She enjoyed writing short stories and stories in serial format for popular magazines. She would, during her career, that stretched from the early 1930's through to the 1970's, produce some 125 romance novels both under her own name and the nom de plume of Mairi O"Nair. She was not as lucky finding a life long romance as some of her book hero were. She never married although engaged three times. one of her suitors was killed, a second died from old war wounds and a third died of heart failure. She eventually adopted three daughters.
Eugenie Fernandes Born Huntington, New York, U.S.A. September 25, 1943. She began her career as an illustrator by working for a greeting card company. She illustrated cheap books where she says she learned to become a better artist. She enjoys illustrating books for young readers and has also written some of her own books. Some of her titles are : Waves in the Bathtub ( 1993), Ordinary Amos and the Amazing Fish (2000).
Kim Fernandes Born Huntington, New York, U.S.A. September 4, 1969.In high school she learned to sculpt  and found that three dimensional art was just how she could best express herself! Kim's Mom, Eugenie, is an illustrator and author of books for youth. Kim was encouraged to use her clay illustrations and write books to accompany her art. She attended the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and developed skills that lead her to a career of full time illustrator and part time author. She stores her fimo ( type of clay) illustrations in pizza boxes! She is a strong believer of 'visualization" ( seeing the completed work in her mind) before she begins working.
Mary Agnes Fitzgibbon Born Belleville, Canada East (Ontario) June 18, 1851. Died May 17, 1915. Some might say that as the grand daughter of the famous Susanna Moodie she came by her desire to write naturally. She wrote thee books including "A trip to Manitoba" (London 1880) and Historic Days (Toronto 1898). She had an avid interest in Canadian history and in 1894 she founded the Canadian Women's Historical Society of Toronto.
Ann Cuthbert Fleming

(née Rae). Born Aberdeen, Scotland. 1788. Died March 15, 1860. She married James Innis Knight July 3, 1810 and later as a young widow married James Fleming May 8, 1820 in Canada. In 1815 and 1816 she published two books called Home and a book of poems entitled A year in Canada and other poems.  Once settled in Canada she became a teacher concerned that the school books being used in her Canadian school house had very little Canadian content. She developed school books specifically for her young students. Her works may have been the first books for Canadian children. Her published works contained views of Canadian scenery and the book The Prompter was subtitled: Progressive exercises on English Language. She wanted to provide interesting lessons for her students and continued to “Canadianize” early textbooks. Source: Dictionary of Canadian Biography Vol. lll pg. 734-35

Pearl Beatrix Foley Born Toronto, Ontario Died October 12, 1953. While she entered her studies at the University of Toronto she did not graduate. This however did not stop her determination to write. She would produce four novels. The third novel was published under the pen name of Paul de Mar.
Gayle Friesen Born September 18, 1960, Chilliwack, British Columbia. After high school Gayle took a year to attend a Bible School in Sweden and to see Europe. Back home in Canada she worked at a bank to pay off her European trip. She married and shortly after her 1986 graduation from the University of British Columbia her first child was born. She now has two children. In 1998 she published her 1st novel for young adult readers called Janey’s Girl. The book garnered attention and won the Red Maple Reading Award and the Canadian Library Associations’ Young Adult Book Award. It has been translated into several languages. She has written an additional 5 books of which the Isabel Factor, published in 2005 received the 2007/2008 Stellar Award from the British Columbia’s Teacher’s Choice Award. Source: Gayle Friesen by Dave Jenkinson. University of Manitoba CM Magazine online (Accessed January 2007)
Mavis Leslie Gallant

(née de Trafford Young) Born August 11, 1922. Died February 18, 2014, Paris, France. As a youngster she told stories to her paper dolls to keep herself quietly entertained. A 4 years of age she was sent to boarding school. Her father died when she was 10 and her mother remarried and left for New York without her daughter who would attend a multitude of different schools. She settled in her late teens in Montreal. Here she married Johnny Gallant an Acadian might club entertainer who was soon a soldier in Europe. She was a working “Girl” at the National Film Board and an reporter at the Montreal Standard newspaper reluctantly hired to replace the men who were off fighting the war. She refused to write “girly” columns and was soon a feature writer for the paper. Her marriage disintegrated after the war and by 1951 she was submitting stories to the New Yorker and off to Live in Paris. Her early years in Europe had her living  in many short-term situations in the south of France, Switzerland and Spain, and eventually settled in the Montparnasse district of Paris, France. This  was the home of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus in the 1950s, and the site of many student demonstrations in 1968 and during the labour and student strikes about the job laws in 2006. She chronicled the uprisings, initially for her personal notebooks, but eventually agreed to let The New Yorker publish them. (They appeared in Paris Notebooks.) She received the Governor’s General Award in 1981  for her work Home Truths: Selected Canadian Stories. She  would receive numerous honorary degrees, the Molson Prize from the Canada Council, the Canada-Australia Literary Prize, a tribute at the International Festival of Authors at Harbourfront in Toronto, the Blue Metropolis Literary Prize, the Inaugural Matt Cohen Prize, and the Pen Nabokov Award for career achievement. In 1981 she was made an officer of the Order of Canada and in 1993 this was upgraded to Companion of the Order of Canada. In 1983-1984 she returned to Canada as Writer-in-residence at the University of Toronto. She was preoccupied with the past in her last years as she  prepared her diaries  covering the years from 1952 through 1969 for publication. The diaries are to be published in Toronto and New York in 2015.In her last  decade she was plagued by ill health and poverty. but  close friends rallied to support her ‘valiant spirit, her coruscating wit and her generous capacity for friendship.’  Source:  Sandra Martin. Writer Mavis Gallant dies at age 91, In the Globe and Mail February 18, 2014 ; The Canadian encyclopedia. Online (Accessed June 2002)
 

Mary Evelyn Gannon Born February 11, 1900, Fredericton New Brunswick. Died January 3, 1975, Fredericton New Brunswick. Mary was a delightful child with a  marvelous wit. She loved the stories her grandparents told and enjoyed even more sharing her own stories with her students where she taught school. In 1935 Mary began to tell her stories on CFNB, Fredericton Radio. Her Just Mary and Maggie Muggins stories soon were available on books for children to enjoy over and over again. The CBC soon came to call and offer Mary a Toronto position as head of the CBC Children’s broadcasting. In 1954 her characters made their TV debut with national exposure. By the time she had retired and moved back to her beloved Maritimes in 1962 she had written over 30 books and over 4,000 scripts for children’s programs. In 1947 the CBC presented Mary Gannan with the Beaver Award and in 1951 she was made an honorary member of the Mark Twain Society. Source: Marilyn Brinell, Memories of Mary www.newirelandnb.ca (Accessed November 2012) ; Andrea Bell, “Mary Gannon”, New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia Online (Accessed November 2012)
Dorothy-Jane "DJ" Goulding As a youngster growing up she worked helping her mother who was director at the Toronto Children’s Players. After high school she earned a music degree and a degree in classical ballet. She attended Toronto Normal School (Teacher’s College) and started teaching in a regular classroom but soon she round the larger appeal of the radio classroom. She scripted fairy tale plays and went on to storytelling. She was soon noticed by CBC Radio and for 9 years from 1948 through 1957 she did Kindergarten of the Air on CBC. It was during this time that DJ married Bill Needles and the couple had five children. She began writing her stories and her first book Margaret told the story of a Irish immigrant girl bringing history alive for young readers. She taught summer school drama for the Toronto Board of Education and continued to write and produce for CBC’s school broadcasting division. She has published songs, books, almost 100 plays, a history of Toronto, an historical novel and drama guides for teachers. After she retired she moved to her farm in Duffrin County, Ontario and began working with seniors as well as working with youth in drama. She also enjoys her online publishing. Sources: Dorothy-Jane Goulding: Profiles. Canadian Library Association, 1971 ; Needles Publishing. Biography. Online (Accessed April 2014)
Rebecca "Becky" Grambo Born February 21, 1963. Rebecca studied to be a geological engineer at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1985. She soon found that her interest in animals could be the base for a new career. She is now an experienced photographer of natural history and has created books to share her love for readers of all ages. She began writing in 1994 and is an acclaimed and award winning author of 25 books. In 2004 she won the Canadian Science Writers Association’s Science in Society Award and the Animal Behaviour Society’s Outstanding Children’s Book Award for Lupe: a wolf pup’s first year. She gets in touch with nature through her gardening and designs intricate needlework patters based on her nature photographs taken around the world. Rebecca is married and has opened her home to menagerie of rescued pets. Check out her web site “Wild Threads” Sources: Wild Threads on line; Herstory: a Canadian Woman’s Calendar 2012.
Minnie Caroline Forsythe Grant (née Robinson). Born Toronto, Ontario. Died November 2, 1923. As the daughter of John Beverly Robinson she was from one of the big families of Toronto and was married in 1842. She enjoyed writing and published a book, Scenes in Hawaii in 1888. Later she became interested in history and turned her writing talents to producing series of articles for the Canadian magazine entitled Bygone Days which were published in 1914.
Elizabeth Frame Born Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia 1820. Died 1913. She took early training at Normal School (Teacher's College) and taught in Nova Scotia. She enjoyed writing and produced two books. Descriptive Sketches of Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1864) and The Twilight of Faith (Boston, 1891).
May Agnes Fleming. (née Early). Born Saint John, New Brunswick November 15, 1840. Died March 24, 1880.  Her early stories were published in New York and Boston while she was still in school! She enjoyed writing romance and mystery novels but as was the fashion of the time her novels would appear as serials (chapter by chapter in newspapers) before being published as full books.  Her serials were published in New York and London, England!
Barbara Florio Graham,

Born  New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.  Barbara was first published at the age of 9 in Humpty Dumpty Magazine, and then  in Jack and Jill, winning a National Scholastic Magazine regional short story award when she was 14. With her B.A. degree from Columbia University she taught English, speech and drama in New York and Chicago and worked in public relations before moving to Canada in 1967. A popular speaker for local, national and international organizations, she has taught courses in writing, speaking and media training. The author of three books, including the 20th anniversary edition of Five Fast Steps to Better Writing and a revised edition of Five Fast Steps to Low-Cost Publicity. Her alter-ego, Simon Teakettle, owns the company, Simon Teakettle Ink, and this cat has his own credits as a writer. Barbara and Simon collaborated Mewsings/museings, a collection of their best humor writing. Together, Barbara and Simon have contributed to 29 anthologies in six countries. Their website is www.SimonTeakettle.com.

Mavis Leslie Gallant. (née Young).  Born Montreal, Quebec August 11, 1922. A fiction writer since 1951 she has published more than 100 stories, most of which first appeared in the New Yorker Magazine. In 1993 she became a Companion of the Order of Canada. She has also written a play She has also written an impressive body of reviews and essays on French culture and society.
Elsie Bell Gardner Born Gateshead-on-tyne, United Kingdom  May 15,1895. Died October 1994. The family grew up in Scotland and Trinidad ,for several years when the father had a position with the police force. During World War l, while working at a munitions factory, Elsie and her sister were enamored with a pair of friends from Newfoundland. Elsie did not enjoy life in Newfoundland and she, her husband and budding young family moved to southern Ontario. Elsie turned to writing overcoming the death of a son. She wrote a series of  books around the world life adventures of a character named Maxie. She typed with using only two fingers on an old Underwood typewriter. Her daughters and their friends used to stand beside the typewriter and read the exciting pages as they came off the machine. When she first started writing she could not find a Canadian publisher and while the American company of Cupples and Leon in New York accepted the manuscripts, they requested that Maxie become American rather than Canadian. Elsie had to retype the entire manuscripts of her first three books! Maxie, an adorable Girl, Maxie in Venezuela and Maxie, Searching for her parents, were runaway success stories. Four more books appeared in the series. A member of the Hamilton Women's Press Club, Elsie also penned a column for the Mail and Empire (now the Globe and Mail) newspaper entitled  Life begins at forty. The Maxie series of books would be finished when the family lived in Burlington. Always interested in politics, Elsie Bell Gardner became the first woman elected to the Burlington Town Council.  Submitted by Anita Gardner Brit, Victoria, British Columbia.
Margaret Gibson. Born April 6, 1948. This writer started off with a bang when one of her first published works, The Butterfly Ward, made her a co-winner of the Best Canadian Short Story. She shared this award with Margaret Atwood. It would later be made into a TV movie for CBC. The movie Outrageous was also based on her work entitled Making it. More recently the made for CBS TV movie For the love of Aaron was based on an aspect of her life. 
Mary Evelyn Gannon Born Fredericton, New Brunswick 1900. Died 1975. She started her working career as so many of her generation of young women did, as a teacher. She had a real gift however, she had a passion for writing stories for children. Her storey telling career took off when in the mid 1930's she began to tell her stories on a local radio program. News of her talent spread and she was discovered by the CBC> The partnership would last from the end of 1930 into the 1960's. She was JUST MARY and her characters, Maggie Muggins, Mr. McGariety, Petunia 'Possum, Mrs. Bettlebug and others found themselves featured in more than thirty books and well as thousands of radio and TV programs. Her home at 35 Brunswick St. in Fredericton is now an historic cite of the Province of New Brunswick.
Phoebe Gilman Born New York City, New York, U.S.A. April 4, 1940. Her career started out as a hobby. She was a professional traditional artist. It took her a long time to finally seek a publisher for her first book, The Balloon Tree in 1985. She was determined to get the book published even though she received over 50 rejection slips! As a child reading books herself she would seek out books with female heroines. She had to be satisfied with Nancy Drew because there were few fictional heroines. She uses heroines like Gillian Giggs in the books she writes. She was awarded the Vicky Metcalf Award in 1993. This award honours Canadian Authors who have written at least four inspirational books for young people.
Rosalind Goforth (née Bell-Smith) Born 1864. Died 1942. Married to the Rev. Jonathan Goforth she would follow him on his mission work to China. In 1937 she published her husband's biography entitled Goforth in China. She also published How I know God Answers Prayer (Toronto, 1939) and Climbing: Memoirs of a missionary's wife (Toronto), 1940).
Sondra Gotlieb.   Born December 30, 1936.  An author, who has one the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour, she has also authored two Canadian cookbooks.  She writes articles for such notable publications as Saturday Night, Maclean’s, and the New York Times.
Elizabeth Goudie. (née Blake) Born Mud Lake, Labrador April 20, 1902. Died Happy Valley, Labrador 1982. She was a wife and mother in Labrador.  After the death of her trapper husband in 1963 she wrote her autobiography, Woman of Labrador (published in 1993).The book became an international best seller.  It is the first recorded history of family life in the wilds of Labrador.
Emma Graham (née Jeffers) Born Wilton, Canada West (Ontario) Died August 20, 1922. While her father, the Rev. Wellington Jeffers was the editor of the famous newspaper the Christian Guardian, she contributed articles to the newspaper. She was also a contributor of articles to the Toronto Globe. She married the Rev. James Graham and was mother to three daughters and three sons. She would published "Etchings from a parsonage verandah (Toronto, 1895)
Gwethalyn Graham (real name Gwethalyn Graham Erichse-Brown).  Born January 18,1913.  This author would use only her first 2 names. Her novel Earth and High Heaven was the first Canadian novel to top the American bestseller list (1945). This same novel would win a Governor Generals Award, would sell for movie rights (alas it was never to be a movie) and would be translated into Braille and 18 different languages! She continued to write but always in the shadow that she could never do as well with another novel.  She wrote articles on immigration, anti-Semitism and women’s issues. Later in her career, she successfully turned her talents to writing TV Scripts.
Linda Granfield Born Melrose, Massachusetts, U.S.A. November 22, 1950. A voracious reader as a child, she credits Louisa May Alcott's character, JO, in the book, Little Women for being her inspiration to write. Her first writing job was to do the high school cafeteria menu each week for the local town newspaper. She worked in her cold basemen, wearing fingerless gloves that allowed her to type and try to keep warm. She is a collector of information on community events. Flyers, real estate advertisements, price lists of everything…all of these things are filed away in order so that they can be retrieved at some future date as a resource. She was awarded the Vicky Metcalfe Award in 2001. his award honours Canadian authors who have written 4 or more works that have inspired youthful readers.
Gwendolyn Margaret Grant

(nee Irwin) Born May 14, 1920, Toronto, Ontario. Died September 1, 2002. She earned a B.A. from the University of Toronto in 1941. During World War II she worked for the Farm Radio Forum outside Montreal, and then in Ottawa for the Wartime Prices and Trade Board. In June 1944 she married the United Church minister John Webster Grant; and in 1946 she earned an M.A. from Dalhousie University. She accompanied her husband to Oxford, England and then to Vancouver, British Columbia where he was a teacher.  While living on the Canadian west coast  she directed student theatre and originated a weekly words and music radio program. In 1957–1958, she wrote descriptive letters used by CBC Radio, and subsequently wrote a study book on south Asia for the Woman’s Missionary Society of the United Church. In 1959 the couple moved to Toronto where  Gwen spent an increased amount of time writing poetry. Sources: Gwendolyn Grant Collection. E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. Suggestion submitted by Jeanne Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.

Vanessa Grant An international lecturer and author of some 25 romantic women's fiction novels she has used her expertise to write a "How-to" book, Writing Romance. Her books have been translated into some 15 foreign languages. Her west coast North American settings for her novels are very popular with readers around the world.
Barbara Greenwood Born Toronto, Ontario September 14, 1940. She has always had a secret desire to be a writer Her high school English teacher would encourage her secret desire that would become her successful career. A piece on Louis Riel published in her high School yearbook would eventually become an acclaimed novel : A QUESTION OF LOYALTY. All her books use Canada as a background setting. She does in-depth research for her historical novels. She learns from primary documents about the people and she also studies the events and how they were described by others during the events themselves. Her book : A Pioneer story (1994) wpm the Information Book Award, Mr. Christie's Book Award and the Ruth Schartz Award.
Germaine Guévremont (née Grignon) Born St Jérome, Quebec 1900. Died August 21, 1968. As a journalist she was a correspondent for the Montreal Gazette. In the 1940 she wrote three novels in French. Two of the novels were translated into one volume in English entitled the Outlander ( Toronto, 1950) which won the Governor General's Award, In 1961 she was elected as a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
Sylvia Gunnery Born October 17, 1946, Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1976 she took a 5 week course at Alberta’s Banff Centre on writing. The course instructors included authors W. O. Mitchell, Alice Munro and others. She became a teacher at junior and senior high school where she inspired students to be creative in their writings. She also used her own writing skills to produce books for young adults and children as well as professional books for teachers. Her sports stories for young adults drew on her own love of playing basketball at high school and university. In 1998 she earned the Prime Minister’s Teaching Award as an outstanding and innovative teacher. In 2000 her book Menace and Mischief won the Canadian Authors Association Lilla Stirling Award. She is a member and has served on the executive of the Writer’s Association of Nova Scotia. Currently retired she is enjoying writing her next books and travelling to provide learning and author sessions at schools and libraries across Canada. Source: “Sylvia Gunnery” by Dave Jenkinson CM Magazine, University of Manitoba. Online (Accessed January 2007)
Louise Bernice Halfe

Born April 18, 1953, Saddle Lake First Nation, Alberta. Her Cree name is Sky Dancer and refers to the Northern lights. At the age of 7 she was sent to Blue Quilts Residential School in St. Paul Alberta as were many aboriginal youth. She choose not to return home but to remain and attend high School. She went on to earn a Bachelor in Social Work from the University of Regina. She had always loved writing and began to write seriously in the 1980’s. She has published several books of poetry one of which Bear Bones and Feathers (Saskatoon, Coteau Books, 1994) received the Canadian People’s Poet Award. She also sent a copy of her work to the Queen of England and the Pope. There was a poem to each of them and the Pope’s thank you said he noted the reference to him. She has travelled across North America and foreign countries such as China discussing her work. She was appointed Poet Laureate of Saskatchewan in 2005. Sources: Biography. Banff Centre of the Arts, accessed April 2013. : Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2006. Saskatoon: Coteau Books, 2005.

Evelyn "Lyn" Harrington (née Davies) Born July 31, 1911, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. She worked at the local Public Library and then decided to earn her diploma in libraries at the University of Toronto. She would return to the Sault and work as their Children’s librarian for 15 years. in 1942 she married Richard Harrington a renowned photographer and the couple moved to Toronto where Lyn became a freelance writer. She wrote books as well. In 1967 she received a Centennial grant for a book for youth, The Luck of the La Verendryes. She has written over 17 books and 2300 magazine articles as well as radio drams. In 1975 she received the Vicky Metcalfe Award for her writings. Source Lyn Harrington by June Munro in Profiles, Canadian Library Association 1971.
Amelia Harris

(née Ryerse), Born February 1798 Port Ryese, Upper Canada (Ontario) Died London, Ontario March 19, 1882. She was the daughter of United Empire Loyalists who settled in Upper Canada in 1784. On June 28, 1815 she married John Harris of the Royal Navy. John was involved in the preparation of maps of the Great Lakes and there is evidence that Amelia was also involved in the preparation of draft maps of the surveyed areas. The family moved a couple of times before setline in Eldon House in London, Upper Canada. The couple would have three sons and seven daughters. Although she did not have much in the way of formal education, Amelia was well read in the literature of the time and she enjoyed corresponding with family members and keeping a diary. Which covered almost 9000 days. She would leave for the next generations a well written detailed portrait of wel-to-do 19th century family life. Her works are know for their clarity and objectivity of her analysis of character. Her cousin , Egerton Ryerson, published her accounts of her early loyalist family life in his work The Loyalists of America and their times. Her diaries are held at the University of Western Ontario. Source: The Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Online Accessed 2001.

Susan Harrison Born 1948, Toronto, Ontario. Died April 14, 2013, Toronto. Ontario. She entered the Ontario College of Art with the encouragement of her father. However formal training did not set well with her and she left after two years. Se became a performing artist worked in video art, did editing and was always an voice as an animal rights enthusiast. She married briefly in her youth to Rodney Werden. In the 1970’s she taped interviews with woman about their sex life which lead to the book Orgasms in 1974. She used the name A.S.A Harrison and a false photo on the book’s jacket. The book became a classic. She earned her necessities by working as a type setter at the Toronto Sun Newspaper and as editor for C Magazine. She collaborated with Margaret Dragu on a book of essays about striptease and sexuality, Revelations in 1987. It would be Margaret who introduced her at this time to her life partner John Massey. The couple finally married  in 2006. A.S.A. became an editor for John’s works. In 1996 she produced a novelty book about how to read your cat’s personality based on its astrological sign. After this in her mid fifties she decided to try her hand at a work of fiction. Her first novel The Silent Wife, based in Chicago to please the U.S. market will be printed posthumously in 2013. Source: “From sexologist to thriller writer” by Judy Stoffman, The Globe and Mail, May 8, 2013
Doris Prisilla Muncey Haslan
 

HISTORIAN
 

Born Bedeque, Prince Edward Island July 20, 1905. She trained as a teacher and even served as a governess in New York for a couple of years. However, P.E.I. called to her and she that in the province until 1945. September 22, 1945 she married Reginald Heber Haslan and the couple went to live on the family farm in Springfield P.E.I. Doris became involved with the Local Women’s Institute and in turn in the history of her community. The history “Springfield 1828-1953” with which he was a major participant received Honourable mention in the Tweedsmuir Village Histories Competition. In 1964 she prepared a booklet of the life and works of L.M. Montgomery: the Island Lady of Stores which would see several reprinting. She co-authored An Island Refuge: Loyalist and Disbanded Troupes on the Island of St. John,  and the work called Loyalists of PEI. She also hand artistic talents she shared in flower arrangements, needlework and knitted garments for charity. In 1972 she received Life membership in the Women’s Institute showing appreciation for her efforts. Source: Outstanding women of Prince Edward Island Compiled by the Zonta Club of Charlottetown, 1981.
Julia Catherine Hart. (née Beckwith) Born Fredericton, New Brunswick March 10, 1796. Died November 28, 1867. She wrote the first work of fiction by a native born Canadian to be published in Canada. Her novel was called St Ursula’s Convent or The Nun of Canada, Containing Scenes from Real Life” (1824). She wrote this book when she was only 17 years old! She would continue publishing her writings while she raised 6 children!
Elizabeth Grace Hay Born Owen Sound, Ontario 1951. While working for the CBC Radio she lived in various areas in Canada including Yellowknife in the northern territories, Winnipeg and Toronto. She rounded out her North American living with time living in Mexico and New York City.  She has won several acclaims for her works including the National Magazine Award Gold Medal in Fiction. Her works have also been on the finalist listings for the Governor General's Awards in literature. her works have included Canadian Tales: Canadians in New York (1993); The only Snow in Havana (1992); Small Change (1997) ; A student of weather (2000).
Lillian Margaret Hendrie Born Montreal, Quebec 1870. Died May 12, 1952. A teacher by profession she was the headmistress of Montreal High School for Girls from 1911 through to 1930. She wrote one book; Early days in Montreal and rambles in the neighborhood (Montreal, 1932).
Julia Willmothe Henshaw (née Henderson). Born August 8, 1868,St Mary’s the Less,  Durham, England. Died November 18, 1937, West Vancouver, British Columbia.  She learned to enjoy the outdoors and photography from her naturalist father. She moved to Montreal and contributed writings to the Montreal Star and the Montreal Gazette. June 15, 1887 she married investment broker Charles Grant Henshaw. The couple had one daughter. The young family moved to Vancouver  where Julia worked for various newspapers including the Province, Vancouver Sun and the Vancouver News-Advisor often under the pen names of Julian Durham or G’wan. .  She enjoyed writing novels and became successful internationally in 1898  when her work; Hypnotized; or the Experiment of Sir Hugh Galbraith (Ontario Publishing Company , 1898)  was called Canadian Book of the Year. She wrote several important plant studies, including Mountain Wildflowers of Canada (1906) and The Wild Flowers of B.C. (1908). At the beginning of World War l she raised funds to send Christmas gifts to overseas soldiers. Later she served as ambulance driver in France. For her war efforts she was awarded the Croix De Guerre. And other service medals of honour and reached the rank of Captain.  She has also been credited with co-founding the Georgian Club, the first women’s social club in Vancouver. Sources: The Vancouver Hall of Fame : Canada’s Early Women Writers, Simon Fraser University. Online accessed November and December 2012
Mary Eliza Herbert Born Halifax, Nova Scotia 1832. Died July 15,1872. An author and editor her first published work were poems that she co-authored with her sister Sarah in 1857. She was the first woman in Nova Scotia to edit and publish a magazine, The Mayflower or Ladies' Acadian Newspaper. The publication was some 32 pages an issue and began publishing in 1851. It only lasted some nine months with failed support from the population. She continued to write and some 4 of her books were published at her own expense due to an absence of any book publishing firms in the province.
Clara Hoffer (née Schwartz) Born January 1, 1887, Austria. Died December 31, 1975. Her family immigrated to Canada in 1903. During the trip to Canada Clara met another young Jewish immigrant, Israel Hoffer (1887-1962) and the couple were soon married. The couple settled as farmers in Sonnenfield, Saskatchewan. There are remembered as outstanding farmers and community leaders. Clara along with her daughter Fannie Hoffer Kahan wrote Israel’s story of immigration and farm live in the book Land of Hope (Saskatoon, Modern Press, 1960) and she also wrote Township 25. Source Jewish Women’s Archive. Personal information for Clara Hoffer Online (Accessed June 2013)
Norah Mary Holland Born Collingwood, Ontario January 10, 1876. Died 1925.   A cousin to the famous Irish writer, W. B. Yeats, this Canadian novelist toured Ireland on foot in 1904.  She published several of her works and in her own day she was a well-respected poet.
Margaret Hollingsworth. Born London, England June 5, 1939. She emigrated from England to Canada in 1968 where she attended a University in Ontario before moving to British Columbia for post graduate studies. She is a notable playwright. Five of her plays were collected and published in 1985 in the book Willful Acts. 
Janet Turner Hospital Born Melrose, Australia November 12, 1942. She moved to Kingston, Ontario in 1971 and attended Queen’s University. She published her first novel, The Ivory Swing in 1982 followed with more novels in the 1980”s and 1990’s. She also published short stories and dipped into the murder mystery genre in 1990 with A very proper death under the nom de plume Alex Juniper.
Monica Hughes. (née Irse). Born Liverpool, England November 3, 1925. Died March 7, 2003.  This author, between 1980 and 1984 won 7 major Canadian awards for literature! In her lifetime she would publish some 35 books for young people.  She is best known for her young adult science fiction, fantasy and contemporary novels. In 2002 she became a member of the Order of Canada.
Nancy Lynn Hundal Born Vancouver, British Columbia January 31, 1957.  She studied for her BA and her teaching certificate at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. A busy mother of 3, she has found time to exercise her passion of writing books, short stories and poems for young readers. Her published titles include I heard my mother call my name (1990); November boots, 1993; Puddleduck, 1995; and Camping 2002. Among her awards are the BC Price in 1991, the Sheila A. Egoff Children's Prize.
Linda Hutcheon.  Born Toronto, Ontario August 24, 1947. She is an author, editor and a critic of art and literature which she combines with being a professor at the University of Toronto.  Among her published books is a study of contemporary Canadian fiction.
Edith Margaret Fowke. (née Fulton). Born Lumsdon, Saskatchewan April 30,1913. Died March 28, 1996. This folklorist, collector, writer, and teacher was interested in Ontario folklore. She presented the songs she recorded on the CBC radio on various shows featuring weekly programs on folklore from 1950 to 1974.  She was a founding member of the Canadian Folk Music Society and editor of the societies journal.
Phyllis Fay Gotlieb. (née Bloom.)  Born May 25,1926.  She published 4 volumes of verse, 5 verse plays, science fiction short stories, and science fiction novels. Some of her works have been translated into several languages.
Marjorie Harris. Born Shaunovon, Saskatchewan September 15,  1937. Her career as editor-in-chief of Gardening Life Magazine has not kept this energetic author from publishing some 19 books, many of which are on her first love of gardening. She has written articles for all the major Canadian magazines and appears regularly on both CBC and CTV radio and television. She was featured in Toronto Life magazine with a biographical sketch. Her latest book, in 1999, is Seasons of my garden. She is already researching another book on the social and anecdotal history of native plants in North America. Have an interesting anecdote to pass on about plants in your area? Contact Marjorie at: florana@interlog.com.  A good web page on Marjorie is: http://www.marjorieharris.com/
Julia Willmothe Henshaw

Botanist and adventurer
Born Durham, England1869. Died November 18, 1937. She inherited a love of nature and wildflowers from her naturalist father. She and her husband, Charles Grant Henshaw settled in the Vancouver area in the 1880’s. She became an international respected novelist of her day with Hypnotized, the book of the year in 1898. She also wrote several comprehensive plant studies including Mountain Wildflowers of Canada in 1906 and the Wild Flowers of British Columbia in 1908. This adventuresome couple were the first to drive a car across the Rockies in 1914.  ( I guess they did not have problems finding gas stations even at this early date!) She worked as an ambulance driver on the front during World War I and was awarded the Croix de Guerre from the grateful country of France. Source: The History of Metropolitan Vancouver – Hall of Fame http://www.vancouverhistory.ca (accessed June 17, 2009)
Grace Irwin

Born 1907 Toronto, Ontario. Died September 2008. In 1929 she earned a B.A. from Victoria College, University of Toronto, and followed up in 1932 with a M.A. , She became a teacher with  a long and rewarding career teaching at Humberside Collegiate Institute, heading the Latin and Greek Department, 1942 until she retired in 1969. During her summer vacation at the family cottage on Beshkung Lake near Halliburton she loved to write. She wrote seven novels, including Least of all saints (1952), In a little place (1959), Servant of slaves: a biographical novel of John Newton (1961), Contend with horses (1969), and The seventh earl: a dramatized biography (1976). She also enjoyed writing poetry and articles in periodicals. Grace Irwin served on the Senate, University of Toronto, 1952–1956, and received an Honorary Doctorate of Sacred Letters from Victoria University in 1991. In 1968 she was awarded the Centennial Medal of Canada. In 1972 she was asked by her church Emmanuel Evangelical Church to become their minister, a position she served full time until 1985 and on special occasions well into her 90’s. In 2001 the Grace Irwin Secondary School Teaching Award was established by the Ontario Classical Association. The Grace Irwin Award, Canada’s top award for Christian authors was named by her nephew in her honour.  Sources: Grace Irwin Collection. E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. : “Grace Irwin, 101, left significant mark on community.” Bloor West Villager, October 7, 2008 Online accessed July 2013.

Annie l. Jack (née Hayr)  Born Northampton, England January 1,1839. Died February 15, 1912.  She was Canada’s first professional woman garden writer.  When she moved to Canada, she used her gardening skills to experiment and make a profit.  Her skills became known throughout North America and she was written up in American publications.  While she wrote and published short stories and poems, it is her horticultural articles for which she is remembered.  Her book The Canadian Gardener : A pocket Help of the Amateur  was published in 1903 and set the gardening standard for all of pre World War 1 Canada.  
Anna Brownell Jameson. (née Murphy). Born Dublin, Ireland May 17, 1794. Died March 17, 1860. A well known author by the time she came to Canada to join her husband she chronicled her 8 month stay in her book “Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada” (1838).
Nina Jamieson (née Moore) Born Dundas, Ontario. Died November 6,1932. As a career journalist she contributed occasional papers on rural life to the Toronto Mail and Empire. She also wrote three books; The Hickory stick: a romance of the school in the cedars (Toronto, 1921) ; The cattle in the stall; sketches and poems (Toronto, 1932)
Amelia Clotilda Jennings. Born Nova Scotia. Died 1895. During her writing career she would use the pen names of "Maude" of Mileta" She wrote some three books: Lenden Rhymes (Halifax, 1854); The White Rose in Acadia (Halifax, 1855) and Autumn in Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1855).
Mabel Annesley Johnston (née Sulivan) Born Toronto, Ontario 1870. Died April 1, 1945. As a writer she often used the pen name of Susanne or Suzanne Marny. She is credited with tow books: The Canadian book of months (Toronto, 1908) and Tales of old Toronto (Toronto, 1909)
Gillian Johnson Shakespeare

(née Johnson) Born February 26, 1963, Winnipeg, Manitoba. As a young girl growing up Canadian winters were a way of life and she started at 6 to compete in speed skating. She would win 12 national speed skating titles and would represent Canada on the national team that trained in Germany.  While she always liked to write and sketch her 1st year at the University of Manitoba was spent in labs for chemistry, physics and biology. However she soon found English courses easier and much more fun. After the death of her father she cared for her mother. After her mother’s death she relocated to Toronto where she met author Nicholas Shakespeare a writer on tour. In 1999 the couple married and settled in Tasmania with some time spent each year in Oxford, England. The couple have two sons. Gillian writes and illustrates her own books for children . Some 30 titles had been published and translated into 10 different languages by 2014. She has also illustrated works by author colleagues including noted children’s poet Dennis Lee. Source: Gillian Johnson by Dave Jenkinson in CM Magazine, University of Manitoba Online (Accessed January 2007)

Alice Jones. Born Halifax, Nova Scotia August 26, 1853. Died February 27, 1933. This author developed the “new woman” theme in her novels.  She also wrote shot stories and travel articles for magazines.  She used the pen name of Alix John for one of her novels.  In 1903 she was described as one of Canada’s leading women novelists. Her works included : The Night Hawk (Toronto & New York 1901); Bubbles we buy (Toronto, 1903) Gabriel Praed's castle (Boston, 1904) ; Marcus Holbrach's daughter (New York, 1912) and Flame of Frost (1918).
Rukhana "Roxy" Kahn Born Lahore, Pakistan March 13, 1962. Rejection of her first storybook by publishers encouraged Rukhana to put away her writing. She got married and started a family leaving her writing alone. Coming across her old rejection slips she found that publishers had actually been encouraging her and made suggestions to improve her writing. She decided to give it a try again. A local librarian encouraged her to learn more about writing from the Canadian Children's book Centre. By the end of 2000 she had penned some five books including an in depth novel. Not a bad accomplishment for someone who thought she could not become a writer because of her ethnic background!
Thelma Ruck Keene

Born January 9, 1916, Uxbridge, England. At 16 she worked in the foreign office at various secretarial positions which took her to postings in Budapest, Athens, Cairo and Beirut before she ended back in London in 1944. She married in 1947 . By 1966 she was divorced and came to Canada where she found work in the Library at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario. Leaving her job she opened a unique craft and book shop, the Canadian Craft Store. Wishing to be closer to her son she moved to the West coast of Canada where she became involved with a peace movement wanting to ban nuclear bombs. She also began a close relationship with the Circle Craft Co-operative and Gallery. She produced the  Craft Circle newsletter as the organization grew to cover the province of British Columbia. In 2006 she published an autobiographical book that included her post WW ll exploits, called The Handkerchief Drawer. (Trafford Publishing, 2006) . Sources: First Generation by Nancy Knickerbooker, Vancouver Asia Pacific Imitative, 1990 

Valerie Jean Knowles. Born Montreal, Quebec  August 2, 1934. She completed degrees from Smith College, McGill University in Montreal and Carleton University in Ottawa. This former history teacher and, now, free lance writer who has been successful in writing for newspapers, magazines and federal government departments. She has authored some 9 books. She uses her historical studies and archives  background to develop her contribution to historical writings of Canada. Her book, Strangers at Our Gates, currently in its 2nd edition (1997) provides the only writing to give a complete overview of the history of Canadian immigration.  She has established herself as a biographer of note with her works on Cairine Wilson, Canada's first woman in the senate (1988),  the award winning book Telegrapher to Titan the life of William C. Van Horne (2004) and a collection of profiles of famous and obscure figures of Ottawa in Capital Lives. (2005)
Joy Nozomi Kogawa. Born Vancouver, British Columbia June 6, 1935. This busy mother of two had previously worked as a writer in the Prime Minister's Office. She is known for her novels, children's books, poetry and essays, which have been published in Canada and in Japan. She is also an activist. She was instrumental in influencing the Canadian government in their settlement with Japanese Canadians for loss of liberty and property in Canada during World War ll.  She is a member of the Order of Canada.
Margaret Laurence. (née Jean Margaret Wemyss) Born Neepawa, Manitoba July 18, 1926. Died January 5, 1987. From age seven she wrote stories. Her gift of writing leaves a permanent mark on contemporary Canadian Literature. Her first writing job was as a reporter and book reviewer for the Winnipeg Citizen. She has been able to write with experience of having lived in England, Somalilanc, Ghana, Greece, Crete, Palestine, India, Egypt and Spain but Canada was always home.  She is much beloved and remembered for her works, her personal warmth, strength and humor which she shared so generously.
Mary Jane Lawson née Katzmann Born Dartmouth, Nova Scotia 1828. Died 1890. She married William Lawson shortly before her death. Perhaps it was his dedication that got her books published posthumously. There was a book of poetry published in 1893 and The History of the Townships of Dartmouth, Preston and Lawrencetown, Halifax Country, Nova Scotia (Halifax, 1893)
Mary Leslie Born Leslie's Corners, Upper Canada (now Ontario) June 11, 1842. Died March 1, 1920. Like many of the well to do pre- Confederation well to do families in Canada, her family sent her to Europe to tour. While she was in Holland she continued her studies in art and also taught art. However it is her writings that would remain her legacy. She would publish some three books including Historical Sketches of Scotland (Toronto, 1905). In 1896 and 1905 she published two books of her poetry. In 1878 she published a novel : The Cromaboo Mail Carrier: a Canadian love story. The novel was banned when first published because it offended many of the townspeople of Erin, Ontario who felt that they were being made fun of by the author. She had planned a sequel to the book but it never materialized. She used her pen name James Thomas James for her 1878 novel and many of her stories written with her pen name were picked up by cheap pulp magazines in the United States.  Source: Guide to the Literary Heritage of Waterloo and Wellington Counties. 1985.
Loris Lesynski

Born Eskilstuna, Sweden March 16. Loris immigrated to Canada with her family as a child. She kept notes in journals which she illustrated on every topic. She loved to write and draw she even wrote poetry. After a formal university education proved be be not what she wanted she took a job at a printing company and was exposed properly to graphic arts. She is totally self-taught as an illustrator  and has worked as a freelance designer. She continued her writing as she had always loved it. It was only after attending a story makers conference in 1991 that she gained confidence to do something with her scribbling. She formed a relationship with Annick Publishing and has not looked back. “Nothing beats a Pizza was a Mr. Christie’s Award honour book. Her works include Boy Soup, Catmagic, Nightschool and many more. Check out your Public Library for more of her books. Source: Loris Lesynski by Dave Jenkinson CM Magazine Profile online accessed January 2007. ; www.Lorislesynski.com

Jean Little Born  Formosa (Taiwan) China. January 2, 1932.  When her doctor parents realized that baby Jean had severe site problems they moved to Canada. Although legally blind she completed her BA at the University of Toronto and trained as a special education teacher. Jean  always knew she would be a writer but she also felt that she had to work at a real job to make a living. She soon gave up being a teacher to be a full time writer.  She has written some 25 children’s books and two autobiographies Little by Little (1987) and Stars Come Out within (1990). Jean Little's first book, Mine for Keeps, won the Little Brown Children's Book Award in 1962 and was republished by Viking Penguin in 1995. She has won a number of additional awards, including a Canadian Library Association (CLA) Book of the Year Medal , the Vicky Metcalf Award,  a Canada Council Children's Literature Award , The Ruth Schwartz Award and the Mr. Christie’s Book Award. . Her books have attracted an international readership and have been translated into several different languages including Korean. Jean lives with her talking computer, her seeing  eye dog, several collected family members and a menagerie of pets including dogs, cats, birds and turtles. Her advice to young people of the world “ Always remember that  the best place for your nose is inside a book.” (quote from www.jeanlittle.com January 2006) A A
Robina Lizars Born Stratford, Ontario. Died August 26, 1918. She is some times referred to by her married name of Smith. She and her sister Kathleen co-authored several historical works including In the days of the Canada Company (Toronto, 1896).
Kathleen Macfarlane Lizars Born Stratford, Ontario.  Died April 20, 1931. Kathleen was educated in Toronto and also studied in Scotland. With her sister, Robina she wrote several books including In the Days of the Canada Company (Toronto, 1896). She also published on her own a historical work, The Valley of the Humber (Toronto, 1913.)
Loreen Rice Lucas

Born December 24, 1914, Midland, Ontario. . Died January 29, 2011 , Hawkestone, Ontario. She was a survivor right from the get go! She survived the influenza epidemic of 1918, falling through the ice on Little Lake, The Great depression, Hurricane Hazel and the fire that took the family livelihood. She raised 8 children and cared for her elderly parents in the family home. She was one of the first women in Ontario to obtain her Real Estate Broker’s License and her insurance agent’s license. She was a lifelong volunteer giving her time to many projects and organizations such as the Oro Historical Society, the Simcoe County Museum and she worked tirelessly with others to make sure swimming lessons were available to the local children.  She shared her life experiences in publications such as the Orillia Packet Times and the Curious Daytripper. At the age of 80 she learned to use a computer and subsequently wrote and illustrated six  books based upon recollections from her life. In 1992 she received the 125th Anniversary of Confederation of Canada Medal, followed in 1993 with being the Citizen of the Year in Oro Township. In 2005 she was woman of the year of the Orillia Business Women’s Association. Sources: The Orillia Packet.

Nicole Luiken. Born May 25,1971. It was not until the summer between grades seven and eight that she read Guide to Fiction writing and began to take her writing seriously.  She began a regimen of writing regularly, one hour per day that grew to three hours each evening. She pounded out eleven books in four years, two are now in print. One is a great ghost story that may be borrowed through your own library.
Janet Lunn Born Dallas, Texas, U.S.A. December 28, 1928.An author of books of historical fiction for young readers her writings have won the Canada Council Prize (1979 and 1988), the CLA Book of the Year for Children (1981 & 1988), the Ruth Schwartz Award ( 1988), the Information Book Award ( 1995), the Mr. Christie's Book Award ( 1995) and the Governor General's Award ( 1998) For all her efforts she received the Vicky Metcalf Award in 1982 which recognizes authors who have inspired youth. She has the ability to transform avid research into a real time machine for young readers. She assures her readers that she does have a ghost in her house and his story is written up in her book "The Root Cellar" (1981).
Vera Lysenko née Lesek  Born Winnipeg, Manitoba 1910. Died 1995. Educated at the University of Manitoba she worked as a nurse, a school teacher and a Journalist at various times in her varied career. She sometimes used the name Luba Novak for her writings. Her work tended to confound standard critical categories and has therefore been much neglected as Canadian writer.
Madge MacBeth. Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1878. Died September 20, 1965. She had married at 15 and was a widow in her 20's with two young sons. She turned to writing to support her small family. She was one of the first travel writers and she constantly had a notebook in her hands and she wrote about everything she saw. . She would have to her career credit some 20 novels, two autobiographies, biographies. travel books and hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles. She also enjoyed radio writing and by 1938 she had written several radio plays, one with 24 episodes! She believed in supporting her profession and was a popular and willing speaker at many events. She was also a president of the Ottawa Branch of the Canadian Women's Press Club.
Jane Elizabeth MacDonald née Roberts. Born Westcock, New Brunswick February 17, 1864. Died November 8, 1922. The sister of the famous author Sir Charles C.D. Roberts she moved west and finally settled in Ottawa, Ontario. She wrote "Our Little Canadian Cousin" (Boston, 1904) and "Dream Verses and other" (Boston, 1906) She co-authored with family members "Northland Lyrics (Boston, 1897)
Blanche Lucile Macdonell Born 1853. Died November 24, 1924. She was educated in Toronto, Ontario. She wrote several stories and published a novel "Diane of Ville Marie (Toronto, 1896).
Agnes Maule Machar Born Kingston, Canada West (Ontario) January 23, 1837. Died January 24, 1927. Educated in Kingston she would show her skills as a writer under the pen name "Fidelis" She would published novels , historical works as well as collections of prose and poetry. For her early work Katie Johnston's Cross (Toronto, 1870) she would receive a prize for the best children's Sunday School Fiction. Among her several works were The Story of Old Kingston (Toronto, 1908) and Stories of the British Empire (Toronto ,19130 In 1873 she wrote with her mother , Memoirs of the Rev. John Machar (Toronto, 1873) Her writings did not masque her views as a Christian, a nationalist, a feminist and a social crusader.
Claire Lorraine Mackay

(née Bacchus) Born December 21, 1930.Died August 11, 2013. At the age of 8 she started her own community newspaper. She won scholarships and earned her BA in Political Sciences at the University of Toronto. She married Jackson Mackay and the couple have three sons. She wrote her 1st book Mini Bike Hero for her son and on a whim submitted it in a contest run by Scholastic Books. She had a great since of humor combined with the ability to be a true wordsmith. She had a love for dictionaries and would always find the right word to spice up her writing. He would write 11 children’s and young adult fiction and non fiction books. Her writing garnered her the Vicky Metcalf Award for her body of work and the Ruth Schwartz Award for One Proud Summer. She was a co-founder of the Canadian Society of Children’s Authors, Illustrators and Performers. She felt strongly about encouraging young authors and she wrote fan letters to authors publishing their 1st book for young readers. Source: “Children’s Author CANSCAIP Co-founder Claire Mackey Dies” by Sue Carter Flin, Quill& Quire, August 13, 2013 ; Obituary, Globe and Mail, August 17m, 2013.

Isabel Ecclestone MacKay née Macpherson. Born Woodstock, Ontario November 25, 1875. Died August 15, 1928. In 1895 she married Peter J. MacKay and in 1909 the couple moved to Vancouver, British Columbia. As a poet she would published some three volumes of verse, including a volume for children. She published short stories and some seven novels. She was a prominent worker with the Canadian Women's Press Club. As a playwright she wrote a number of plays which have been produced in Canada and the United States.
Elizabeth MacLeod Born   October 21,Thornhill, Ontario. Elizabeth attended the University of Toronto where she studies sciences. After university she backpacked through Europe for a year and returned to work at the Ontario Ministry of the Environment. One summer she attended the Banff School Publishing Workshop in Alberta. Returning home she had a contact from the course approach her to work at Owl Magazine, the Canadian publication for young children. To supplement her Owl income she wrote for the text book publishing company, Grolier as well as the Owl book publishing group. Leaving Owl in 1989 she worked for a software company which taught her that she would rather be publishing books. Working with Kids Can Press she has written biographies of famous people as well as the Kids Book of Great Canadians published in 2004. That same year her work on Helen Keller won the Society of School Librarian International Honour Book designation. She has also published in 2006 the Kids Book of Great Canadian Women. Since Elizabeth also enjoys being in the kitchen she has used her love of baking to produce several books for youth  including Bake and Make Amazing Cakes and Gifts to Make and Eat. Sources: Elizabeth MacLeod by Dave Jenkinson CM Magazine, University of Manitoba, 2006 Online (Accessed January 2007)
Jean Newton McIlwraith Born Hamilton , Canada West (Ontario) 1859. Died November 17, 1938. A prolific writer for her day, many of her works were meant to provide information and biographical data for her readers. The making of Mary (New York, 1895) was followed with A Book About Shakespeare (New York, 1898) and Canada (New York, 1899) She would also write Sir Frederick Haldimand (Toronto, 1904) among others.
Louise Maheux-Forcier. Born June 9, 1929.  In 1963 her first novel was awarded the Prix du Cercle du livre de France.  She wrote of the then critical theme of lesbianism. She continued to write novels and branched out to short stories and scripts for films for TV.
Antonine Maillet. Born May 10, 1929. A storyteller supreme, this novelist is most famous for her French language work La Sagouine which is rich in Acadian heritage. This novel has been made into a very popular one-person play. Linda Evangelista.   Born 1965. At 15 while a unsuccessful contestant in a beauty contest she was approached by a modeling agent.  A serious and successful international model she has been on the cover of every major fashion magazine cover around the world.
E. Madge Mandy

Adventurer

Born in the U.S.A. A college professor from Kansas she married T. Joseph Mandy a mines engineer and amateur photographer. The couple loved the western Canadian northland. Madge would write of their experiences trekking across the area in the 1930’s and with reprints in the 1990’s the books effects are still being felt. The book was : Our Trail led Northwest: true trail romance and adventure in British Columbia. (Reprinted Surrey, B.C.: Heritage House 1992.) Madge Lake, Madge Mountain were both named for this adventurer. The town of Burnaby , British Columbia boasts of Madge Ave., named in her honour. Source: Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2000. (Silver Anniversary Edition) Coteau Books, 1999. Page 12.

Alice Stuart Massey née Parkin. Born Fredericton, New Brunswick  Died July 29, 1950. The wife of Canada's first Canadian Born Governor General, kept her busy with an extremely active social life that was required of the family she had married into. She did have an interest in women's roles in modern society and was author of Occupations for trained women in Canada (London, 1920)
Carol Matas Born Winnipeg, Manitoba  November 14, 1949. She went to theatre school and acted in Toronto before discovering her talent for writing children's books. She enjoys writing fantasy. She also has taken what she considered an important story about the treatment of Jews in World War ll and written a book so that Canadian youth would know what happened. Her books have won the Geoffrey Bilson Award ( 1987), the Silver Birch Award (1993) and the Red Maple Award( 1996).
Margaret Dixon McDougal Born (1826 (?) Died 1898. As a writer she was known to have used the pen name "Nora" or Norah" One larger work that was published was "The letters of "Norah" on her tour through Ireland. She also published "Verses and Rhymes by the Way" (Pembroke, 1880) and The Day of a Life (Almonte, 1883)
Sara (Sarah) Mickle

Born June 13, 1853, Guelph, Ontario. Died June 2, 1939, Toronto, Ontario. The family relocated from Guelph to Toronto. Not much is recorded on her early life. She was active in supporting her church, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church as well as the Hillcrest Convalescent Hospital in Toronto. Her avocation was local history. She worked with the Pioneer and Historical Society of the Province of Ontario which as a meeting when she was the only woman in attendance she suggested be renamed the Ontario Historical Society. She was immersed in the Women’s Canadian Historical Society serving from 1897 through 1930 on the executive committee including serving some 15 years as President. She wrote papers for the WCHC and was in demand as a gifted speaker. In 1899 she worked with a group to set up a successful historic exhibition at Victoria University. She also poured her energies over the years into saving the site of Fort York from being devoured by urban commercial takeover. Another Conservation project close to her heart was the restoration of Colborne Lodge the 1837 home of artist-architect John George Howard, located near High Park. Source: Dictionary of Canadian Biography vol. XV Online (Accessed March 2014 .

Margaret Millar née Sturm. Born Kitchener, Ontario 1915. Died March 26, 1994. She married Kenneth Miller when she was a student studying the classics at the University of Toronto in 1938. In 1941 she penned her first novel The Invisible worm" She would write some 6 novels in her early career all of which had a Canadian setting. After 1950 her mysteries were mainly set in California where she had settled with her family. She even did the Hollywood 'thing' after world war ll when she was a screenwriter for Warner Brothers Studios. She and her husband, had a mutual enjoyment of nature and helped found a chapter of the National Audubon Society. in 1965 she was the Los Angeles Times Woman of the Year. Her numerous writings are often overshadowed by the works of her husband who became a well known mystery writer under the pen name of Ross Macdonald.
Lucy Maud Montgomery. (married name Macdonald.)  Born Clifton, Prince Edward Island November 30, 1874. Died April 24, 1942 It is no surprise to know that she was born in Prince Edward Island.  She would use the stories and lessons of growing up in her world famous novels about a young orphan named Anne. Later there was also Emily and Jane, new characters to share with the world. Have you ever read "Anne of Green Gables?In which of the 14 languages the book is translated did you read the book?
Susanna Moodie (née Strickland). Born Bungay, England December 6,  1803.  Died 1885. Susanna was a settler in Upper Canada and she wrote about her adventures in a famous book called Roughing it in the Bush. She was also an early Canadian journalist writing for the best of the Canadian literary journals of the day. She was very suspicious of the “Yankee” (American) influence on early Canada. Her sister, Catherine Parr Trail was also a famous Canadian author.
Alice Munro. Born Wingham, Ontario July 10,1931.  Her short stories appear in magazines such as the New Yorker and The Atlantic.  She has collected her stories and published numerous books of stories. A novel, Lives of girls and women, grew from her short stories.  She has received 3 Governor General’s awards for her works.  She also has won the Canada-Australia Literary Prize and the Marion Engel Award and the W. H. Smith Award from Great Britain.
Louisa Annie Murray Born Carisbrooke, England May 24, 1918. Died July 27,1894. She emigrated to Canada in 1844 with her family and they became pioneers on Wolfe Island near Kingston, Ontario. She taught school as a young woman. She began to write with the encouragement of a neighbors. With the endorsement of Susanna Moodie her work Fauna, or the red flower of leafy Hollow appeared in the Literary Garland magazine in 1851 in serial format. She persevered publishing perils and loss of work to become the major Canadian prose writer of the 1870's. She also published a small number of poems.
Mitiarjuj Nappaaluk. Born Kangiqusujuaq, Quebec. An esteemed story teller whose stories and legends have been broadcast for years on the CBC radio she draws on her traditional upbringing. She had her feet firmly planted in both the traditions of her people and the modern worlds. As an author she is the first author to publish a novel in the Inuktitul language. She has translated the Roman Catholic Book of Prayer into Inuktitut so that her people my learn in their own language. She has compiled an encyclopedia of traditional Inuit knowledge, legends and natural history so that the traditional spoken knowledge may be passed to all who seek knowledge of the unique culture of her people. In 1999 she received an National Aboriginal Achievement Award for her contributions to heritage and spirituality
Martha Ostenso. Born Bergen, Norway  September 6, 1900. Died 1963. She was educated in a Winnipeg high school and the University of Manitoba. While she taught school she worked on her 1st novel,” Wild Geese” (1925). She spent time as a reporter, and a social worker but still found room for her writings.  She would complete another novels.
Jeannine Ouellette Born June 4, 1958, Kapuskasing, Ontario. She attended the bilingual University of Ottawa were she earned a B.A. in Psychology followed by a Masters Degree in education. While at University she worked as a movie reviewer for the campus radio on Ellspace, a program for women on campus. On December 22, 1979 she married Guy Théroux of Kapuskasing and the couple settled in Ottawa. She was a contributed  to the national women’s magazine Femmes d’action from the Fédération nationale des femmes Canadiennes-francaises for the years. She is the co-founder of the Action Group Against Violence Against Women in Northern Ontario. She Supervised the production of Tfo’s series on children who grow up in violent homes, S.O.S. Géneration en détresse and co-wrote the teacher’s guide which accompanied the television series. She has published a book on women’s learning with the University of Ottawa Press, Les femmes en milieu universitarie: liberté d’apprendre outrement. in 2000 the book won the Laura Jamieson Prize from the Canadian Institute for the Advancement of research on Women for the best feminist book by a Canadian author. She was the host of the Télèvision Rogers cable program D’hier àujourd’hui on local Ottawa television. The program combined her interest in history and enjoyment in teaching people about their past. In 2008 she began a blog highlighting the accomplishments of milestones and mentoring women of Ottawa throughout it’s history. Embracing further the medium of the internet Jeanne has also begun in 2012 a blog highlighting the women of Northern Ontario along highway 11.: Les femmes de la route 11: Elles du Nord. Source: Personal contact with Jeannine Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.
 Uma Parameswaran

Born Madras, India. As a child she enjoyed reading. As a youth she read and studied the Greek classic plays. Winninag Smith-Mundt Fulbright Scholarship she studied literature at Indiana University earning her master’s degree in creative writing. She moved to Winnipeg Manitoba in 1966 and continued her university studies at the Michigan State University receiving her PhD in 1972. She is married and has one daughter and the family has settled in with Dr. Uma working as a professor at the University of Winnipeg. She began her professional writing career in 1962 producing an historical drama. In 1967 her writings won the Lady Eaton Award. In 1980 her work was awarded the Caribe Playwriting Completion first prize. Her collection of short stories What Was Always Hers won both the New Muse Award and the Jubilee Award. During her work, writing career and family responsibilities she has also found time to return service to the writers world by working with several boards and committees including the Status of Women Writers Committee, the Board of Immigrant Women’s Association of Manitoba and as president of the Manitoba’s Writers Guild. Obviously she enjoys nothing more than being creatively busy. Suggested sources; Uma Parameswaran web site at the University of Winnipeg. (Accessed May 2008)

Francine Pelletier. Born April 25, 1957. This author has written 14 novels for young adults and several novels for adults.  In 1988 she was awarded the "Grand Prix de la science-fiction du fantastique Quebecoise" for her work, La petite fille de silence, also the same year she was awarded the "Prix Boreal" for the work, les temps de migrations
Marjorie Lowry Christie Pickthall

Born Gunnersby, Middlesex, England, 1883. Died 1922 Vancouver, British Columbia. Marjorie moved with her family to Toronto, Ontario in 1889. She sold her first story; Two-ears to the Toronto Globe while still a student at Bishop Strachan School. She was employed as an assistant librarian at Victoria College Library, Toronto, from 1910 to 1912. She contributed to several periodicals. Returning to England in 1912 she  participated in World War I as an ambulance driver, a farm labourer and a library clerk. She wrote many short stories and poems during this period. After the war she returned to Toronto, then moved to Vancouver, where she continued to write. She  published over 200 short stories and approximately 100 poems along with numerous articles in journals such as Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, and Scribner’s. She also contributed to young people’s magazines. Her publications include: Poetry: The Drift of Pinions (1913), Lamp of Poor Souls and other Poems (1916), The Woodcarver’s Wife and other Poems (1922), Little Songs (1925), and Complete Poems (1927); Short stories: Angels’ Shoes and other Stories (1923); Novels: Little Hearts (1916), and The Bridge (1922). Sources: Marjorie Lowry Christie Pickthall Collection.  E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. Submitted by Jeanne Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.

Sharon Pollock. Born Fredericton, New Brunswick April 19, 1936.  Her birth name was Mary Sharon Chalmers. Her first published play , A compulsory Option, won the 1971 Alberta Playwriting Competition. After teaching at several western Canadian institutions she became, in 1984, the first woman artistic director of a major western Canadian theatre.  She has written several plays of children as well as TV and radio scripts. Her play DOC earned her the 1984 Governor General's Award.  In 1988 she was awarded the Canada-Australia Literary Prize.
Agnes Helen Fogwill Porter. (née Wright) Born St. John’s, Newfoundland May 8, 1930. She began her writing career as an adult in 1964. She was already a busy wife and mother of 4 children. She excels in  writing fiction poetry and writing of drama. She won the Canadian Library Association Young Adult Canada Book Award in 1989 and received the Newfoundland and Labrador Arts Council Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993.
Rosa Portlock (née Elliott) Born England 1839. Died 1928. She emigrated to Canada in 1871. She married William Portlock. It was not until after the death of her husband in 1893 that she began to consider publishing her works which were mainly autobiographical in nature. The Head Keeper (Toronto, 1898) and 25 years of Canadian Life (Toronto, 1901).
Janis Rapoport

Born Toronto, Ontario, 1946.  In 1966 she married Dr. David Seager in 1966. The couple had three children. In 1967 she earned  a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Toronto.. She married Douglas Donegani in 1980, they had a daughter and became  divorced in 2003. In 2003 she married Fernando Miranda Arregui. She has been Associate Editor of Tamarack Review (1970- 82), Editor of Ethos (1983-86), Playwright-in-Residence (1974-75), and Writer-in-Residence at several Ontario libraries (1987 -1991). She also worked as a literary and television editor, and as an instructor at the University of Toronto. Her writings have garnered several awards including:  the New York Art Directors Club Award of Merit in 1983, the American Institute of Graphic Arts Certificate of Excellence in 1983, the American Poetry Association Award in 1986, a Canada Council Arts Award in 1991, a Toronto Arts Council Award in 1990 and 1992, and an Ontario Arts Council Work-in-Progress Grant in 1995. Her articles have been published in Canadian magazines and newspapers, and her writing has been anthologized in four languages. Sources: Janice Rapoport Collection. E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. Submitted by Jeanne Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.

Gwendolyn Ringwood. (née Phares) Born Anatone, Washington U.S.A. August 13, 1910. Died May 24, 1984. In 1941 she received the Governor General's Award for outstanding service to Canadian drama. She was the first Canadian playwright to publish a volume of collected plays in 1982.
Ellen Ross née McGregor Born Banff, Scotland. Died 1892. She emigrated to Canada with her second husband. When let a widow by the death of her husband she turned to writing to support herself. She had numerous articles and stories published in various Canadian and American magazines. She als published some 4 books between 1868 and 1878. . These included: Violet Keith (Toronto, 1868) ; Wreck of the White Bear (Montreal, 1871) ; A Legend of the Grand Gordons ( Montreal, 1873) and Legend of the Holy Stones ( Montreal, 1878)
Margaret Ross Born Middlesex County, Canada West (Ontario) July 5, 1845. Died February 9, 1935. She is chiefly remembered for her biography of her brother who was premier of the province of Ontario from 1898-1904.  The book was called. Sir George W . Ross: A Biographical Study (Toronto, 1923)
Gabrielle Roy. Born March 22, 1909. Died July 13, 1983. A 3 time winner of the Governor General’s Award in Literature as well as international award holder, she is one of the most important Canadian writers of the Post World War II Era in Canada. Some of her works have been translated into 15 different languages
Jane Rule (née Vance) Born March 28, 1931, Plainfield, New Jersey, U.S.A. Died November 27, 2007 Galiano Island, British Columbia. During the Second World War her family moved around various army basis before finally settling in San Francisco. Jane attended Mills College, Oakland, California  and earned her B.A. While teaching at Concord Academy in Massachusetts in 1954 she met her lifelong partner, author and educator Helen Sonthoff. The couple moved to Vancouver in 1956 and soon received their Canadian citizenship. She taught periodically at the University of British Columbia while writing. Her 1st novel, Desert of the Heard was published in 1964. In 1976 the couple settled on Galiano Island off the west coast of British Columbia. Desert Hearts became a movie in 1985 and was a ground breaking topic. In all she wrote a dozen book including three short story collections as well as writing for various high profile publications. For the gay liberationist newspaper the Body Politic a regular column from 1979-1985. In 1998 she received the Order of British Columbia and was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2007. Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (Accessed April 2014)
Olga Ruskin

Born February. 23, 1887, Vancouver British Columbia. Died October 12, 1953, Vancouver, British Columbia. She attended the University of British Columbia when it was connected to McGill University, Montreal. She left teaching to marry Frederick James Rolston in 1909 and raised a family of three children. Tilly worked closely with many associations and clubs including being  a director of the Vancouver-based Pacific National Exhibition, an Honorary President of the Women's Canadian Club, president of the Oratorio Society, Quota Club, and the Travel Women's Club. She was also the founding chairman of the Theatre Under the Stars, board member of the YWCA auxiliary and of the Vancouver Symphony Society. While a homemaker she continued her interest in politics and actually entered politics as an elected Progressive Conservative Member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in1941. In 1951 she sat as an Independent for the remainder of the session. She became a supporter of W.A.C. Bennett and in the 1952 B.C. election in Vancouver-Port Grey, she was elected as a Social Credit candidate and named education minister. She was the second woman in British Columbia to be appointed to the cabinet and the first woman in all of Canada to hold a specific portfolio. She was a staunch advocate education for every child. Source: http://www.viu.ca/homeroom/content/topics/people/rolston.htm (Accessed December 2012.

Eleanor Ann Saddlemyer. Born Prince Albert, Saskatchewan November 28, 1932. This educator and author is a professor at Massey College, Graduate Centre for Study of Drama and Victoria College at the University of Toronto. Among the many distinguished recognitions she was presented with were the 1994 YWCA Toronto Woman of the Year Award and the Order of Canada. Her more than one dozen published books have been related to drama and English literature. She is also an accomplished editor and member of several editorial boards such as Theatre History in Canada/ Histoire du Théatre au Canada.
Mary Anne Sadlier née Madden  Born Cootehill, Cavan County, Ireland December 31, 1820. Died April 5, 1903. She emigrated to Canada in 1844 and published her first works by subscription ( where people sign up to purchase a book before it is published. )In 1846 she married published James Sadlier. They remained in Montreal where she continued to write and establish her name as an author. The family moved to New York but after her husband's death she returned to Montreal. During her career she would publish some 60 volumes of work from domestic novels to historical romances to children's catechisms. A friend of the assassinated Canadian politician, Thomas D'Arcy McGee, she edited he book of poems and had it published posthumously in 1869.
Margaret Marshall Saunders. Born Milton, Nova Scotia April 13, 1861. Died February 15, 1947. Margaret originally wrote under the name Marshall Saunders to hide her identity. While it was just becoming somewhat respectable for women to be writers when Margaret was publishing her works, writings by women were not best sellers. In 1894 she wrote Beautiful Joe, a story of an abused dog, for a competition sponsored by the American Humane Society. It won first prize! Beautiful Joe would became the first Canadian book to sell more than 1,000,000 copies. It was translated into more than 14 different languages. (source: http://beautifuljoe.org (accessed on May 20, 2008)
Annie Gregg Savigny Died July 10, 1901. She became and established author with such titles as A romance of Toronto (Toronto 1888); Lion, the mastiff (Toronto 1895) and Three wedding rings (Toronto n.d.) She could perhaps be considered a pioneer of early multi media writing as she apparently worked or at least published for the Canadian Department of Agriculture in 1898 when she prepared under her own name a lantern slide lecture on teaching kindness to animals called : Dick Niven and his Nobby. The work consisted of some 24 slides but only the descriptive text has survived.
Carol Ann Shields. Born Oak Park Illinois, U.S.A. June 2, 1935. Died July 16, 2003. A writer and professor she is also Chancellor at the University of Manitoba.  The busy mother of 5 children, this writer won the National Book Critics Circle Award, Governor General’s Award for Literature, The Booker Award and the Pulitzer Prize for her novels.  Along with writing novels and biographies, she has also written 5 plays.
Nancy "Nan" Evelyn Shipley née Summerville Born Glasgow, Scotland 1902. Died 1990. Coming to Canada as a youngster she grew and married and settled in Winnipeg. Her first book was published in 1957 and followed it with ten more works for young readers. Some were historical studies and some were biographies. Many of the stories featured native and Métis women. In 1959 she organized Manitoba's first Indian handcrafts sales centre and she was elected Woman of the Year in Manitoba by the Women's Sales and Advertising Council in 1965.
Virna Sheard née Stanton  Born Cobourg, Canada West (Ontario) 1865. Died February 22, 1943. In 1898 she began publishing short stories and poems in various magazines and journals. On July 10, 1884 she married Dr. Charles Sheard and they raised a family of four sons. Between 1898 and 1938 she would publish some 12 books including; Trevelyan's Little Daughter (Toronto, 1898) and A Maid of Many Moods ( Toronto, 1902).
Jessie Georgina Sime Born Scotland February 12, 1868. Died 1958. After the death of her parents she emigrated to Montréal in 1907. There she used her powers of observation of the middle class life of single women immigrants in the pre world war one urban Canada. Her father had been an author and in Scotland she had written book reviews and articles for newspapers and magazines. In 1919 she published a book of short stories called Sister Women that told of her observations. She was a respected lecturer on women writers and women characters in works by male writers. She was a member of PEN and represented Canada at the PEN world conference in Vienna. While she published at least two additional works but it is Sister Women that illustrates the disproportional suffering  women in an era of social change. The work was republished in 1992 as a part of a series on works of Canadian women authors.
Beverley Simons. Born March 31, 1938. A playwright of dramatic works she drew from her own background for some of her play settings.  She also wrote of women elders, studies of life in retirement homes and of the contemporary human condition.  She is considered a Canadian playwright of significance.
Constance Lindsay Skinner Born December 7, 1877 Stanley, British Columbia. Died March 27, 1939, New York City, New York, U.S.A. At 10 years of age her family left the Caribou region relocation 1st to Victoria and then to Vancouver, British Columbia. Even as a teen in school she wrote plays, poetry and newspaper article under the names of C. Lindsay Skinner and Constance Lindsay. By 1895 her work had been published in the Canadian Magazine out of Toronto. By 1913 she used her full name when publishing her poetry. By 1920 she used full name exclusively for all her writings. In 1900 she moved to Los Angeles and worked for the LA Times and the following year her works appeared across the country. In 1903 she was working for William Randolf Hearst at the LA Examiner By 1908 she was in Chicago and in 1912 she had arrived in New York City. As well as writing “Sob Sister” stories of human interest she successfully continued her poetic endeavors and wrote plays which she published in her own collected works, In the 1920’s and 1930’s she was known for her histories of pioneers as well as a 3 volume history of the fur trade: Beavers, Kings, and Cabins (NY; Macmillan, 1933). She also wrote successful novels with Canadian settings from 1917 through 1929. She published 19 books, 30 short stories and some 75 poems. Most of her female characters were brave resourceful and refused to defer to men.
Source: Jean Barman, “SKINNER, CONSTANCE LINDSAY (Constance Annie),” in Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 16, University of Toronto/Université Laval, 2003–, accessed July 28, 2014, http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/skinner_constance_lindsay_16E.html.
Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch Born Brantford, Ontario  December 12, 1954. In school, she had trouble learning to read until she introduced herself to the works of Charles Dickens.  In High School she wrote satire for the school newspaper. She studied English at the University of Western Ontario and credits her degree with giving her the true talent to read and learn enough to become a successful sales person  for cutting tools. She read up on everything before going for sales! Leaving her job she returned to school to earn her Maters in Library Science. It was here that she was introduced to Children's literature. She married in 1981 and became a stay at home for her son. In 1992 she began to write her own books. She received over 100 rejections slips but in 1994, her first book Sliver Threads was published. She has never looked back.
Elizabeth Smart. Born Ottawa, Ontario October 27, 1913. Died March 4, 1986.  She began her career as a journalist but became known for her novels and poems.  In 1945 she published her first book, which was considered a masterpiece and was reprinted several times.  It was 32 years before she produced her next two books.  She published again in 1984.
Barbara Smucker. (née Classen ) Born Newton, Kansas, U.S.A. September 1, 1915. Died July 31, 2003. She came to Canada in 1969. This author, teacher, and children's librarian has won several awards for her works including the Canada Council Children’s Literature Prize (1977).  Look for her “Underground to Canada”, “Days of Terror”, White Mist” and other books. This author wove her stories for young people around little known historical events and inserted a youthful fictional character with whom her young readers could relate. Her books have been translated into several foreign languages as well a Braille and talking books for the sight impaired. .
Irene Mary Spry. (née Biss)  Born Standerton, Transvaal, South Africa August 28, 1907.  Died December 16, 1998. The works of this historian on the Palliser Expedition of 1857-1860 are definitive studies.  She represented the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada at the Associated Country Women from 1954-to 1967 and was executive chairman 1959 to 1965.  She was a fervent supporter of Canada and of a social democratic approach to public policy.  She was named an Officer in the Order of Canada in 1993.  Failing eyesight did not kept her from almost daily studies at the National Archives of Canada where she could be seen using a large magnifying glass in order to read documents. Source: Personal interview.
Kathy Stinson

Born April 22, 1952. Born April 22, 1952. Kathy has had a variety of careers from sorting mail, waiting tables to teaching school. She was one of the last teachers to go directly from one year in Teachers’ College into the classroom. While teaching she worked toward a B.A. at the University of Toronto, but she didnt complete it. She married in 1971, had two children (a son and a daughter), and then divorced. She has been with life partner Peter Carver since 1985. In 1982 she published her first children’s book, Red is Best with Annick Press. Since then Kathy has published more than 2 dozen works including picture books, novels for young adults, historical fiction, short stories, biographies as well as several other works of non-fiction.  Red is BestBig or Little? and The Bare Naked Book have all been published in 20th or 25th  anniversary editions. Mom and Dad Don’t Live Together Anymore, published in 1984, was revised and re-illustrated in 2007.Mom and Dad Don’t Live Together Anymore, published in 1984, was revised in 2007. Her books have made the Ontario Library Association Top Ten books of the Year listing and the CBC lists Red is Best as one of the top ten Picture books each Canadian Home should have. She has been Writer-in-Residence at various Public Libraries in Southern Ontario including, East York, Toronto, Kitchener and Vaughn. Kathy also has embraced the latest technology as Writer-in-Electronic Residence, linking her to student and Professional writers across Canada. Source: “Kathy Stinson” by Dave Jenkinson CM Magazine, 2006 online (Accessed May 2014) ; Personal contact.

Kathleen May Strange Born London, England 1896. Died Ottawa, Ontario January 9, 1968. née Redman.  née Redman. Married December 23, 1918, in 1920 she emigrated to Canada with her husband Major Harry. John. Latimer Strange and they worked a farm in the Canadian west. In 1923 they won the World Wheat Championship in Chicago. By 1928 she had contributed various articles to Canadian magazines. In 1937 she won an award for her non-fiction work With the west in her Eyes, which was a description of her own early farming life. During her career she would compose some 60 short stories that would be published. She also published Never a Dull Moment (1941) the memoirs of her husband.
Anne Tait

Born Toronto, Ontario. She received a B.A. from Victoria University in 1954, and later earned her M.A. at the University of Toronto, 1972. Her work in the Toronto entertainment industry has included being a casting director of feature films such as Margaret’s Museum, as well as major Canadian and American television series such as Road To Avonlea; she has won two Anik awards, and was nominated for an Emmy. She hosted her own daily CBC radio program, and the weekly public affairs television series Some of The People. In 2000 she founded ANNE TAIT PRODUCTIONS to develop and produce quality feature films and dramatic television. The 2009 award winning film Iron Road was her first as a co-producer. Sources: Anne Tait Collection, E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013. Submitted by Jeanne Ouellette, Ottawa, Ontario.

Carrie-Jo (C.J.) Taylor Born Montreal, Quebec August 31, 1952. Her father was a strict Mohawk who had been removed from his culture. Carrie has found herself in her Aboriginal culture and is shares her joy with her father and young readers. She shortened her name to CJ when she autographed her paintings. Her father took her out of school at 16 as he saw no reason for girls to have an education. Carrie-Jo at 19 found herself married and soon she was a struggling single parent. She sought solace in painting. She combined her art with her interest in her native culture to express her feeling .She began writing books touring and talking about learning and Sharing. She enjoys painting large canvases and enjoys producing her works with loud music blearing in the background. She worked for awhile in Radio and even had her own show on CBC TV. However it is her children's books that are her financial support. Many of her 22 published titles are available in French and other languages eve, Braille for the blind
Adeline Margaret Teskey Born Appleton, Canada West (Ontario) 1853. Died March 21, 1924. She was educated at the Genesee College located in New York State, U.S.A. Between 1901 and 1913 she would publish some six books including The Village Artist (Toronto 1905), and Candlelight Days (Toronto, 1913).
Audrey Grace Thomas.

 Born November 17, 1935 Binghamton, New York, U.S.A. She attended Smith College before studying in Scotland at the famous St. Andrew’s University. After teaching in England she moved to British Columbia in 1959. In 1965 she published her 1st magazine short story. In all she has written 15 novels and collections of short stories as well as numerous radio plays and broadcasts for the CBC. She was the first winner of the Ethel Wilson B.C. Fiction Prize for her 1984 novel Intertidal Life., and she has taken the award two more times. Internationally she has gained recognition with the Canada-Scotland Literary Fellowship in 1984 and in 1987 the Canada-Australia Literary Prize. In 1987 she received the Marian Engel Award and in 2003 the Tereasen Lifetime Achievement Award. Source: “Audrey Grace Thomas” by Veronica Thompson, the Canadian Encyclopedia.

Clara McCandless Thomas. Born Strathroy, Ontario  May 22, 1919.  She would publish as her first book, her University of Western Ontario, masters thesis on Canadian Novelists 1920-1945. In 1961 she became a member of the teaching faculty at York University where she continued until her retirement in 1984. While teaching she worked on several critical studies and biographical books of Canadian writers. In addition to her contributions of literary histories, reference works, essays and periodical articles she also served on numerous editorial boards and scholarly committees and served a term in 1971-72 as President of the Association of Canadian University Teachers of English. She is a member of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1989 she was awarded with the Northern Telecom Canadian Studies International Award for distinguished Service. 
Dora Olive Thompson. Born 1895. Died September 29, 1934. As the daughter of Henry L. Thompson, president of Copp Clark Publishers one might consider that the door for a career was already open to her. Open door or not, one must have talent to consider a writing career. Dora would leave a legacy of some 6 books for young Canadian readers. Her writings, usually had the title of the name of a Canadian girl and  told the story of their lives with attention to their school live, church life and good deeds. As an author she showed acceptance for multiculturalism showing warmth and concern for European immigrant families in her fictional community life.
Lola Lemire Tostevin. Born June 15, 1937. This bilingual author has produced books in both of Canada's official languages.  Her command of her second language, English, can be seen in her poetic publications.  Her poems and novels express feelings of life experiences such as pregnancy and birth as well as loss of immediate family members in death. 
Teresa Toten

Born Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia). October 13, 1955.  At only a few days old her mother left Croatia to join the baby’s Canadian Father. Teresa’s early life was rather unsettling with the family moving 17 times from city to city to city. Unfortunately her father died when she was only seven months old. Her first career choice was to be a mermaid. But practicality of life took over. She attended the University of Toronto and completed a Masters in Political Science just in time to marry and mover to Montreal. Once settled she worked as a freelance broadcaster for Radio Canada International before moving to Ottawa, Toronto, New York City and back again to Toronto. In between moves 2 daughters were born and she decided to become a stay at home mother. During this time she turned to writing. She also became involved as a volunteer with Frontier College and teaching English as a second language. Her writing has been mainly for young readers and has resulted in numerous books having been published starting in 1995. According to Teresa writing is almost as good as being a mermaid! Source: Teresa Toten by Dave Jenkinson CM Magazine Profile online accessed January 2007.  ; teresatoten.com

Catherine Parr Trail (née Strickland) Born London, England January 9, 1802. Died August 29, 1899. This pioneer came to Canada with her lieutenant husband in 1832. She wrote of the life around her in what was then "The Canadas" in her book the Backwoods of Canada. She would also note the flora of the region in her Canadian Wild Flowers. Her sister, Susanna Moodie was also a well known Canadian author. 
Jane Urquhart Born Little Long Lac, Ontario. June 21 1949. This author is a respected novelist, has also written poetry. Most of her works have been published and translated in several foreign languages. In 1992 her novel The Whirlpool was the first Canadian book to win France's prestigious Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger (Best Foreign Book Award). Her third novel Away remained on the Globe and Mail newspaper's National Bestseller list for 132 rooks which was the longest of any Canadian boo. Away also won the 1994 Trillium Award and the Marian Engle Award for an outstanding body of prose written by a Canadian woman. In the fall of 1997 her fourth novel The Under painter won the Governor General's Award.
Charlotte Vale-Allen

Born Toronto, Ontario  January 19, 1941. Charlotte lived with an overbearing father who was physical with her. She left high school to take up her teen passion and studied formal night classes in acting. She once dressed as a messenger boy to take a fan letter to Bette Davis. Davis was smitten by the letter and she became friends with the young upstart. Escaping her home situation she moving to England and worked from 1961-64 in sleazy night spots to make a living. In the mid 1960’s she brought her career back to Canada. Married in 1970, she soon became an urban mother to a beautiful daughter. By 1975 the urge to write became strong and she wrote her only non-fiction book that would be called Daddy’s Girl about her abusive childhood. The subject of the book was not popular in that era and she would publish some fifteen works of fiction before she would get this ground breaking work to readers. She has penned over thirty books which have been grabbed up by the public, mainly in the United Kingdom where she is one of the most borrowed authors from libraries. Her books sell in over twenty countries but yet she is not overly recognized in Canada. She developed her own Press to publish her own commercial fiction  Her stories deal with strong feisty women who discover that they can take care of themselves when it comes to living with adversity. She also writes under the pen name of Katherine Marlowe. She divides her time between her home in Toronto and a second home in Connecticut. Sources: “Ignored at home. Successful abroad” by Diane Frances MacLean’s October 15, 1999: Canadian Who’s Who 2005 (University of Toronto Press, 2005)

Marianna Valverde Born Rome Italy. March 9, 1955.She studied for her PhD at York University in Toronto in 1982 in Social and Political Thought. From the mid-1980's though the mid 1990's she did theoretical and historical works on gender and sexuality. in the 1990's she devoted herself to the sociology of law with her main current research interest in the deployment of low-level administrative and lay knowledges of vice, sex and race in various legal complexes. Her 998 book, "Diseases of the Will: alcohol and the dilemmas of freedom" (Cambridge) won the Law and Society Association's Herbert Jacobs biannual book prize in 2000. Princeton University Press published her most recent book, "Law's Dream of a Common Knowledge" (2003). She teaches theory at the Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto, and is currently engaged in a socio-legal research project on urban/municipal law and bylaw enforcement.
Yvonne Vera Born Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Died April 7, 2005. As a child she was the first Black person to get a library card at the whites only Public Library in Bulawayo. She came to Toronto, Ontario and attained her undergraduate and graduate degrees, including her PhD in record time and got  married She was drawn back to her troubled homeland of Zimbabwe with her need to write. She would publish 5 novels and a collection of short stories, all of which have been translated into several languages.  Acknowledgement of her talent came in awards such as the Commonwealth Writers Prize for African 1999 and the Swedish PEN Tucholsk Prize which recognizes works on taboo subjects. She wrote about problems in her native land, such as : incest, abortion, rape, infanticide and suicide. The BBC World Services has produced a 2 hour work which serves as a biography of this courageous writer.  Evidently, when she wanted to write she would check herself into a hotel for three weeks and emerge with a manuscript such as Butterfly Burning (1998) . Perhaps the fast track studies at York University and the 3 weeks production of a manuscript were part of the knowledge that having AIDS meant she did not have a long time to do what she wanted to achieve in her lifetime.
Anne Louisa Walker Born England 1836. Died July 7, 1907. She emigrated to Canada as a child with her family. In 1858 she and her sisters ran a private school for Girls in Sarnia. She married Harry Coghill and would write Leaves from the Canadian Backwoods. (Montreal, 1861). She also enjoyed writing hymns such as Work, for the Night is Coming.
Willa Walker

Born 1913, Montreal, Quebec. Died July 4 2010  St Andrew’s, New Brunswick. As a young girls she had wanderlust and worked as a post mistress on a ocean liner. She visited China, worked as private secretary to Lady Marlar, wife of the Canadian ambassador, Washington. D.C. In 1939 she married David Walker an officer in the Black Watch. David was a prisoner of War for five years during the war and she was constantly trying to help him escape by sending him maps and information hidden in gift packages. She joined the Royal Canadian Air Force Women’s Division  becoming a wing officer. Reunited after the war the young couple travelled extensively before settling in St Andrew’s New Brunswick to raise their family of four sons. It was here that Willa wrote about the town in several books. She was kidded by her family for having 7 work desks in her home. She also founded, owned and operated a successful retail business. Source: Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2012. Coteau Books, 2011.

Sheila Watson.  Born New Westminster, British Columbia October 24, 1909. Died February 1, 1998.  (née Doherty) Her novel Double Hook, written in 1959, is considered the point for the beginning of contemporary writing in Canada.  She was awarded for her writings the Lorne Pierce medal from the Royal Society of Canada.
Katherine (Kit) Brennan Watters. Born April 9, 1957. During her studies at Queens University she received awards including the Lorne Green Award. She acted for several years but prefers writing plays. One of her works, Spring Planting has received the Saskatchewan Writers Guild Award
Emily Poynton Weaver Born Manchester, England 1865. Died March 11, 1943. In 1880 she emigrated with her parents to Canada. She would study and become a well known author and historian. She published some 11 books in the field of Canadian history including: A Canadian History For Boys (Toronto, 1905) : The stories of Counties of Ontario (Toronto, 1913) and Canada and the British Immigrant (London, 1914)
Margaret Hubner Wetherell (née Smith) Died 1933. A writer of local history she is best remembered for her Jubilee History of Thorold Township. (Thorold, ON, 1898). The original edition had now name of the author but when the work was re-issued in 1933 Wetherell's name appeared as the author of the work.
Joan Weir Born Calgary, Alberta April 21, 1928. Raised in Calgary and Winnipeg, Joan, attended the University of Manitoba. She worked in advertising at Eaton's department store where she had great fun with Radio programs such as the Santa Claus program. This was her introduction to writing. While she has written history and biography non-fiction for adults she has received the most of her joy from writing for teenagers. She married a doctor in 1955 and stopped work to stay at home with her children but she still found time to research and write. Along with her books she penned scripts for TV series such as 'Fifteen' on the Nickelodeon Network. She is also a teacher providing classes in creative writing at University College of the Caribou. You may find many of her over 20 books at your library!
Harriet Annie Wilkins Born England 1829. Died January 7, 1888. She emigrated to Canada as a child with her family and settled in Hamilton, Canada West (Ontario). Between 1851 and 1882 she would publish some five books.
Clara Flos Jewell Williams Born October 2, 1889, Dundalk, Ontario. Died January 20, 1970, North Saarnich, British Columbia. Flos spent her youth attending Jarvis High school in Toronto and after she attended Normal School (Teachers College) in Toronto to obtain her teaching certificate. She taught in Bobcageon and the Karatha Lakes District, and then back to Toronto. On April 23, 1923 she married David Selkirk Williams (1882-1963) a travelling salesman. In 1923 the young couple had settled in Calgary where they raised their twin sons. Finding herself alone with her husband on the road for his job she began writing. In 1925 she submitted a book an won runner up prize of $2500.00 from Hodder & Stoughton Publishers. She wrote poetry and short stories along with magazine articles that were published in various well known Canadian periodicals. In 1949 she won a prize from Ryerson Press for her book Fold Home which was set in the Caraboo District of British Columbia. She relocated to the west Coast later in life. Her house at 5 Rose Ave, in Cabbagetown, an inner neighborhood in Toronto, is marked with an historic plaque, from the local heritage group.  Sources: Cabbagetown People : The social history of a Canadian Inner City Neighborhood. Online (Accessed March 2014)  ; Flos Jewell Williams, Digital Collections, Library, Simon Fraser University. Online (Accessed March 2014)
Marjory Willison Born Toronto, Ontario. Died December 15, 1938. née MacMurchy. In 1926 she married Sir John Willison and became Lady Willison. She would write some five books between 1916 and 1937: The Woman Bless Her (Toronto, 1916); The Canadian Girl at Work (Toronto. 1919); The Child's House (London 1923); Golden Treasury of Famous Books (Toronto, 1929); The Longest Way Round (Toronto, 1937)
Budge Wilson Budge Marjorie Wilson née Born Nova Scotia May 2,1927.Her writings began winning awards with the CBC Fiction Award in 1981.  She has won among some 25 other awards the Atlantic Writing Competition for fiction, the Canadian Library Association Award,  the Mariana Dempster Award, and the Thomas Randall Award. Most of her books, more than 30 titles, have been for youth although she often writes with adults in mind and she does have many adult fans. Her works have been published in 11 countries and 9 different languages.  Perhaps you have read some of her books? The Leaving (1990), The Courtship (1994), Cordelia Clark (1994), Fractures (2002) and Friendships (2006) are a few of the titles she has written. She is also well known for her 5 collections of short stories.  In 2006 she was admitted to the Order of Canada. She was selected to write the 2008 prequel in celebration of 100 years of Anne called Before Green Gables. (Information submitted by Alan Wilson)
Ethel Davis Wilson

née Bryant. Born January 20, 1888, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Died  December 22, 1980, Vancouver, British Columbia. After the death of her parents when she was ten she moved to Canada to live with her grandmother. She was educated at private schools in Canada and England before returning to attend the Vancouver Normal School (teacher’s college). After graduating in 1907 she taught public school until her marriage to Dr. Wallace Wilson in 1927.  Ethel began writing in 1937 with her early stories being published in British magazines. In 1947 she published her first novel, Hetty Dorva. From 1947-57, she wrote four more novels, best known being Swamp Angel. Mrs. Golightly and Other Stories, her last published work, appeared in 1964. She received a special Canada Council medal for contributions to Canadian literature and the  Lorne Pierce Medal from the Royal Society of Canada. She was inducted into the Order of Canada and in 1970 received the Canada Medal of Service.  British .Columbia's top fiction prize is named for her. Sources: The Canadian Encyclopedia online : The Vancouver Hall of Fame Online accessed November 2012. Suggested reading: Ethel Wilson: Stories, essays and Letters. Edited by D. Stouck (1988)

Frieda Wishinsky Born Munich Germany July 14, 1948. She moved with her family and would grow up in Manhattan (New York City) where she attended the University of New York. She studied for her Masters in Special Education at Ferkauf Graduate School and then began working with disabled adults. She married  and settled in Toronto where the couple adopted 2 children. She started writing books and became hooked on writing before publishers became hooked on publishing her works. The early refusals only empowered her energy and her determination. She has published mainly for the your market. Her works have introduced youth lives of famous people such as Frederick Law Olmstead, the "man who made parks",  Einstein in " what's the matter with Albert' and Marie Currie in 'Maya's dream'. She enjoys writing about scientists, she tells fan, but doesn't mean to become one. A prolific writer, since 1997 she has produced almost 20 books, published in Canada, the USA and Great Britain.
Pam Withers Born July 31, 1956. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A. As a child reading was her passion. At 18 she discovered Whitewater Kayaking and from there other fast athletic enjoyments. Sports, however, never took away her ambition to be a writer. After attending Beloit College in Wisconsin, she naturally turned to journalism for her profession. She combined her sport and her job by working as associate editor of River World, a whitewater kayaking magazine. She would meet her Canadian husband at a sporting event. It seemed a natural progression to writing extreme sport novels. She could often be found writing at the hockey area where he son played hockey! Her goal is to put several novels a yea for your readers on library shelves. Check out her web site at http://takeittotheextreme.com ( accessed March 2007) .
Joanna E. Wood Born Lanarkshire, Scotland. December 28, 1867. Died 1927. In the hay day of her writing contemporary magazines hailed this author as the Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens or the Nathanial Hawthorne of Canada. She was rated as one of the top three Canadian authors along with Gilbert Parker and Charles C.D. Roberts. It was with the support of her family that she was encourage to have her writings published as early as 1890. “A daughter of Witches was published as a serial, a chapter at a time, in the Canadian Magazine in 1898. Critics described her characters as “vivid and magnetic.”
It is not really known why the novels stopped in 1902. She did present lectures in local history but did not present the information in print. Source: Industry Canada. Http://collections.ic.gc.ca/heirloom_series/volume6/130-131.htm
Johanna E. Wood Died 1919. She emigrated to Canada with her family when she was a child. As an author she would publish some 4 books between 1898 and 1902.
Constance Woodrow Born 1899. Died August 1, 1937. née Davies. This author would pen the book The Celtic Heart (Toronto, 1939) which was published after her death.
Kate Yeigh Born London, Canada West (Ontario) 1856. Died March 4, 1906. She worked as a journalist and married writer Frank Yeigh in 1892. She would continue writing and produce a novel.
Pamela S. Yule  Born New York State. Died March 6, 1897. née Vining. After her training and some experience in the U.S.A. in 1860 she was appointed instructor of English at the Canadian Literary Institute, Woodstock, Canada West (Ontario). She met and married James Cotton Yule. She enjoyed writing poetry and published Poems of the Heart …(Toronto, 1881). She would publish an additional four books including Records of a vanished life : lectures, addresses etc. of James Cotton Yule (Toronto, 1876) in memory of her late husband.
Journalists and Broadcasters      back
Naomi Yanova Adaskin (née Granatstein)  Born Toronto, Ontario May 6, 1908. Died March 1, 1996. She studied music with such well know Canadian as Healey Willan and Mona Bates. She made her debut as a pianist at Massey Hall, Toronto when she was just 12 years old. With her piano playing partner, Etta Cole, the duo toured successfully toured North America. In 1939 she became a soloist. She taught at the Toronto Conservatory of Music and wrote articles for various Canadian publications such as the Star Weekly, Chatelaine and the Globe and Mail newspaper in Toronto. She was the music critic for the Toronto Daily Star and edited school music texts for Ginn and Co. publishers. She accomplished this busy career and still found time to be a mother to two daughters.
Kate Aitken Born Beeton, Ontario 1891. Died December 11, 1971. née Scott. As a youth of 14 she began teaching. In 1914 she married her childhood sweetheart, Henry M. Aitken and settled down to farm life. She began a small canning business from her farm in Beeton, and was soon working at speaking engagements with the federal and provincial departments of agriculture. She also began writing articles for farm journals. By World War ll she was Conservation Director for the Federal Wartime Prices and Trade Board. This was an unpaid position which provided Canadians with a advice to "Use it up, wear it out, make over, make do". She soon found a position as women's editor at the Montreal Standard and had a regular radio program popular across the country. She wrote 9 cook books which were still being reprinted in 2004! In addition she was author of a half dozen other books including two autobiographical publications. In 1941 she earned $25,000.00 a year compared to the average wage for men of $3,000.00 per year. In 1950 she earned $5,200.00 a week, one of the highest paid women in the country.. She was taping 600 radio broadcasts a year,  making 150 speeches a year while still retaining her position as cooking editor of the Montreal Standard newspaper. Her staff responded to 5,000 fan letters a week! During her career she interviewed such world personalities as Hitler, Mussolini, King George, queen Elizabeth, Franklin Roosevelt and our Canadian Prime Ministers ,  King,  St Laurent and  Pearson. After retiring from Broadcasting in 1957 she turned her energies to working for the United Nations, and UNICEF.
Barbara Amiel . Born Hertfordshire, England December 4, 1940. A writer, journalist, and editor, Barbara was editor for the Toronto Sun newspaper.  She has won the Edgar Allan Poe Award for best face crime book and was the “Woman of Distinction” in 1989. She is married to Conrad Black, a noted newspaper entrepreneur. Source: Canadian Who's Who.
Doris Hilda Anderson

(née Buck). Born Calgary Alberta November 21, 1921 Died Toronto, Ontario March 2007. In 1940 she graduated from Teachers College. She taught in the rural schools of Alberta to earn money to put herself through the B.A. program at the University of Alberta in 1945. She moved to Toronto hoping to find work as a journalist. She started with menial jobs at the Toronto Star Weekly and as copywriter for Eaton’s Department Stores. In 1949 she decided that she wanted to write fiction and took off for Europe. She did however maintain Canadian ties by writing stories for Maclean’s magazine and Chatelaine Magazine. Returning to Canada in 1951 she worked at Chatelaine , beginning a 20 year career becoming in 1957 editor in Chief of the magazine. In 1957 she married David Anderson. The couple would have three children but the marriage ended in divorce in 1972. In 1974 Doris became a member of the Order of Canada, an award that was changed to Companion of the Order in 2002. She ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the House of Commons and accepted a position with the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women. Her strong personality would eventually see her leave this position but not before pressure made sure that the new Constitution recognized women as equals!. She was the YWCA Woman of Distinction in 1982 and in 1991 she received the Governor’s General Persons Award in recognition for her promotion of the equality for girls and women in Canada. In 1993 she became Chancellor of the University of Prince Edward Island. In 1998 she was Chair of the Ontario Press Council. In 1984 she returned to her journalism roots working for the Toronto Star newspaper. Sources: Canadian Encyclopedia online Accessed July 2011: Doris Hilda Anderson by Jessica Bedaoui in Biographical Sketches of nine members of the Canadian Women’s Press Club . Ottawa, Media Club of Ottawa, 2011.  Pages 4-5.

Pat Annesley

Born August 17, 1936 Tesdale, Saskatchewan. Died February 27, 2012 Vancouver, British Columbia. At 15 she won a writing contest in which she was provided with a full scholarship at the Banff School of Fine Arts in Alberta. At 16 she won a National Newspaper Award. She was hooked. Journalism was to be her career. She worked at the Calgary, Albertan and the Herald, the Edmonton Journal as well as the Winnipeg Tribune. While at the Tribune she met Fred Annesley, a fellow reporter. The couple married and had two children. She worked earning herself a daily column in the Toronto Telegram and later for McLean’s Magazine In the early 1970’s she ran Information Services for TVOntario. She retired to Vancouver in 1983 still dappling with some freelance writing. Source: Loves Lived by Belle Laderoule and David Cobb, The Globe and Mail, October 26, 2012. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario

Sally Armstrong Born Montreal, Quebec 1943. A journalist and human rights advocate for women and children, Sally graduated with her B.Ed from McGill University. Her writing and film documentary work have taken her the the centers of world unrest and mistreatment of women and children in Bosnia, Somalia Rwanda and Afghanistan to provide her eyewitness reports. She has won the Gold Award from the National Magazine Awards foundation the Author's Award from the Foundation for the Advancement of Canadian Letters and the Amnesty International Media Award in 2000 and again in 2002. She has received the 1996 Women of Distinction Award from the Toronto YWCA and in 1998 the Order of Canada. She has been editor of Homemaker Magazine (1988-1999) and is currently editor at large for Chatelaine Magazine. CBC Television has aired several of her major film documentaries and she has published a book : Veiled Threat: the hidden power of the women of Afghanistan (Penguin Books, 2002).
Gladys Marie Marguerite Arnold

Born Macoun,  Saskatchewan October 2, 1905. Died Saskatchewan September 29, 2002. After high school she began teaching but by 1930 she found herself working as a secretary at the Regina Leader-Post. Journalism was to be her career. In 1935 she took a grain ship to France and was  on tour in France when World War ii broke out. Her happenstance allowed her, as the only Canadian journalist on site,  to post articles for the Canadian Press. Between 1936 and 1941 when she was forced to flee Germany,  she became officially named Paris correspondent reporting firs hand on the European conflict. After she fled Europe she dedicated herself to the plight of France. She co-founded the Free the French Association in Canada and traveled throughout North America with her compassionate plea. In 1941, France asked her to return to report on post war life. Her work in France garnered her the order of Chevalier de a Légion d’Honeur, the highest distinction given by the grateful nation of France. In her 80’s her reports from France became the base for her  book: One Woman’s War. Returning to Canada after the War she was head of the Information Service of the French Embassy until retirement in 1971. She would become the subject of a History Television documentary called Eyewitness to War. In 1948 and 1949 she was elected as president of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. With her adventuresome spirit she never stopped looking for a good story. During her lifetime she visited and reported from 60 difference countries. She also  established an additional legacy of perpetual scholarships in French Language and Journalism at the University of Regina. Sources: Biographical Sketches of Nine members of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. Media Club of Ottawa, 2011 page 6. ; Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan online accessed July 2011. ; Gladys Arnold Eulogy October 2002. Online accessed July 31, 2011.
 

Alice Asselin This journalist was the wife of Olivar Joseph Francois Asselin, the founder and proprietor of the newspaper Le Nationaliste, of Montreal. She was a working reporter and correspondent for Le Nationaliste. In 1904 she was a member of a group of women journalists sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railroad to travel and cover the St Louis World's Fair. It was during this train trip that the Canadian Women's Press Club was founded.
 
Vera Lyla Helen Ayling (née Daye) Born February 4, 1906, Saint John, New Brunswick. Died January 21, 1999. She enjoyed writing even in public school. In grade 8 she wrote a story about a child in World War l and won a Saint John city wide prize for her work. In her 20’s her stories were published in the United Church Sunday School papers. She also wrote stories and plays for radio. In the late 1920’s and early 1930’s she worked at the New Brunswick Museum Archives. On June 22, 1937 she married Arthur Richard Ayling and  settled in Moncton, New Brunswick. The couple had two sons. After her marriage she wrote stories for the popular national publication the Family Herald and the Canadian Red Cross Junior Magazine.  Vera joined the Canadian Women’s Press Club in 1944 where she served numerous times as president of the New Brunswick Branch as well as serving on the National Executive several times. She was a feature writer for the Saint John Telegraph-Journal, a career that covered 65 years. McClelland and Stewart Publishers took note of her work and she began writing for their Canadian School Readers series where she had stories published as early as 1948. These school readers were used in schools for three decades. She also published Arrivals and Departures; American School Readers (Allyn & Bacon Inc., in 1957. Arrivals and departures: American School Readers (Allyn & Bacon Inc. , 1957). She is perhaps best remembered by the public work her stories about families, farm life and New Brunswick handcrafts which appeared in numerous national publications as well as H. Gordon Green’s book Canadian Handcrafts. Sources: Who’s Who in the Media Club of Canada. 1991. (s.l.; 1991) ; Vera Ayling Collections , New Brunswick Archives provided by Reference services, New Brunswick Archives September 2014.
 
Ashleigh Banfield Born December 29, 1967, Winnipeg, Manitoba. She earned her B.A. at Queens University, Kingston, Ontario. Her first job was as a reporter in Kenora, Ontario. From 1989 through 1992 she worked on the evening news in Edmonton, Alberta.  While in Calgary she was awarded two IRIS Awards. She moved to work in the U.S.A. and earned an Emmy as Best News Anchor when she worked in Dallas at KDFW TV. She also won the Texas Associated Press Award for best series “To Serve and Survive”. She is remembered for her live reporting for 8 days straight after 9/11. She married June 29, 2002 to Harold Gould and the couple have two sons.
 
Mary Morrison Baker Born Southern Ireland.  She credits her time at boarding school with teaching her to be independent and also proving her with a high standard of conduct. She attended the National University of Ireland and then studied in France. Mary cultivated her writing shills as a teen when articles were published in the London Daily Express newspaper. She married James Baker of Sydney, Australia in 1942. The couple lived in various locations while becoming parents to four children. In 1954 they moved to Canada where Mary shortly after became a widow. She kept her family together by holding various jobs including buying and selling antiques. In 1964 and 1967 her writings won her the Senator Cairine Wilson Citizenship Trophy when she wrote of her home in Prince Edward Island. She was also editor of the Women’s Institute News from 1959-1963. In 1980 she had a weekly TV antiques show in PEI. Source: Outstanding women of Prince Edward Island Compiled by the Zonta Club of Charlottetown, 1981.
 
Laura Banks (née Brown). Born 1914 (?) Died November 1988. She began a successful TV broadcasting career under the name of Laura Lindsay at CFRN TV in Edmonton. From 1955 though 1968 she had her own show on homemaking. The show was live and unrehearsed and after the show she washed the dishes and cleaned up the set by herself! In 1964 she published a book, Laura’s Recipes that sold 30,000 copies.
 
Robertine Barry. Born L’isle-Verte, Lower Canada February 26, 1863. Died January 7, 1910. A well known personality in Montreal society she was a pioneer feminist lecturer and writer. She is considered the first woman journalist in French Canada. She joined the staff of the weekly newspaper La Patrie in 1891. Here column was written for almost then years under the nom de plume of Francoise. She would go on in her career to found Le Journal d Francoise, published from 1902-1909 . She also would publish books of her short stories. In 1900 she was one of the Canadian government representatives to the famous Paris International Exhibition. In 1904 the government of France named her as an “Officer de l’Acaémie” She was part of the group of Canadian women Journalists who were sponsored to go to the St Louis World's Fair in 1904 and during the trip they established the Canadian Women's Press Club, with herself being elected at Vic President.
 
Gertrude Balmer Watt . (née Hogg) Born Guelph, Ontario. 1879-1963. Gertrude married Arthur Balmer Watt in 1900. She began her journalism career with the Woodstock Sentinel-Review where she used the byline “Peggy”. The young couple moved to Alberta in 1905. Arthur was a newspaper editor who worked with various Edmonton newspapers including the Edmonton Journal. They were stanch supporters of women’s rights and her articles on life of western women were published in various Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail in Toronto. In 1904 she was among a group of lady journalists who were sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railway to travel and cover the St Louis World's Fair. It was during this train trip that the Canadian Women's Press Club was founded. After the St Louis World’s Fair she would establish the Edmonton Chapter of the CWPC and along with her continued newspaper columns would write several books on women and life in the Canadian west.
 
Florence Diamond Bean Born 1910, Minto Township, Wellington County, Ontario. Died 1993. As a young lady she too a secretarial course in Toronto, Ontario. She married Clarence Diamond and later married Ellworth Bean. From 1977 to 1980 she was President of the Ontario Federated Women’s Institutes. She too leadership roles in conference of the Associated Country Women of the World. She was an active member of the Waterloo Farm and Home Safety Council, the Wilmot Agricultural Society, the Wilmot Horticultural Society and the Waterloo Historical Society. She was the Haysville correspondent for the Kitchener – Waterloo Record for 30 years and had a radio career with CFRB in Toronto. In 1990 she was the Wilmot Citizen of the year. She was also presented with the Queen’s Jubilee Medal. Source: Waterloo Regional Hall of Fame. Online (Accessed July 2014)
 
Carol Gay Bell Born Regina, Saskatchewan. After high school she earned her B.A. at the University of Manitoba. She also too additional schooling in Radio and Television Arts at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute , Toronto, Ontario where she received the silver medal as outstanding female graduate. She began her career as a journalist and was the CBC’s 1st female announcer for radio and television, the 1st Saskatchewan producer of musical variety on CBC Television, Canada’s 1st female jazz disc jockey, and a actress in the first live drama on Saskatchewan’s CKCK television. Off the job she became the first certified baton-twirling judge in western Canada, and -coordinated the first musical theater program at the Saskatchewan Summer School of the Arts. She is the founder of the Saskatchewan Roughrider Cheerleaders squad in 1960 and remained as director though to 1977. As part of Canada’s 1967 Centennial Carol initiated the Saskatchewan Express, a touring show with Saskatchewan performers. This program would hatch the Saskatchewan Talent Program in the performing arts. She and her husband Vern worked full time with the troupe to Celebrate Saskatchewan’s 75th Anniversary as a province. She has been recognized for her efforts in 1985 as the YWCA Woman of the Year, professional category), 1986 she won the Larry Schneider Communications and Leadership Award a, in 1997 she received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit and in October 2008 she was invested as a Member of the Order of Canada. Source: City of Regina. History. Online. (Accessed January 2012.) ; Order of Canada Online (Accessed January 2012)
 
Louise Bennett-Coverley

 

Miss Lou

Born Kingston, Jamaica September 7, 1919. Died July 31, 2006. She was one of the first Black women broadcasters in the 1940’s. While still as student at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, England, she hosted a radio show called Caribbean Carnival. After she emigrated to Toronto she used her knowledge of her culture, the stories and songs, sa a basis for her radio shows which included ‘Laugh with Louise’, ‘Miss Lou’s Views’ and  educated Jamaican immigrant children with her TV show ‘Ring Ding’. She married Eric ’Chalktalk’ Coverley and they had a son and many ‘adopted’ children. Miss Lou as she was known, had been made a member of the Order of the British Empire and had received an honorary doctorate from York University, Toronto and another from the University of the West Indies. She died the night she was to be presented with the 2006 Jamaica Independence Award Hall of Fame from the West Indian American Association of New Jersey. Source: Miss Lou, 86: Bedrock of Canadian culture by Philip Mascoll, The Toronto Starr, August 1, 2006.
 

Francis Marion Beynon. Born Streetsville, Ontario May 21, 1884. Died October 5, 1951.  A journalist, feminist, and social reformer she was a determined individual who wrote of votes for women, marriage and family structure. She was a pacifist and resigned her position at the "Grain Growers Guide", an influential Prairie magazine, over views on World War I.
 
Mary Elizabeth Bibb
 

 

First Black woman journalist in Canada

National Historic Person

(née Miles)  Born Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1820. Died Brooklin, New York, U.S.A. 1877. Mary was born a free Black Quaker and was privileged to be educated , graduating from Normal School (Teacher’s College) in Lexington, Massachusetts. She was one of the first Black women teachers in North America. In 1847 she met her future husband Henry Bibb ( d. 1854) who was an escaped slave, at an anti-slave rally in New York City. The couple were wed a year latter and settled in Boston. In 1850 the couple fled to Canada after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law which could have caused Henry to be re-enslaved. Settling in Sandwich, Canada West (now known as Windsor, Ontario) the couple played a key role in the famous Underground Railroad that helped escaped slaves settle in Canada. The co-published the newspaper The Fugitive Voice beginning in 1851. Mary is credited with being the first Black woman journalist in Canada. Later her sister-in-law Mary Shadd Cary would become the first Black woman publisher of a newspaper. Mary Bibb also operated a dress making business and taught both adult Black and their children in a class in her own home. She fought for Black schooling in the area for several years. After Henry’s death she carried on until 1871 when she returned to the USA. She and Henry were declared Persons of National Historic Significance by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada in 2002. Sources: Section15.ca ; Merna Forster 100 more Canadian Heroines; Famous and Forgotten Faces (Toronto; Dundurn Press, 2011.
Arlene Billinkoff Born March 27, 1942. Died Winnipeg, Manitoba  March  23, 2009. Arlene lived in New York City for a short time and had good memories of working on the political campaign of John F. Kennedy. Returning to Canada, she earned her degree in economics and political Science at the University of Manitoba. She joined the staff of the Winnipeg Free Press in 1964, working in the women’s section. She left the newspaper when complaints of inequality of pay with male reporters were ignored. She travelled in Europe a few months only to return to a job at the newspaper which met her demands.  From  1970 through 1994  she was the well respected legislative reporter, writing the column Under the Dome.  She was also known as a supporter and mentor for young reporters. She enjoyed being a participant , even after her retirement, in the “Beer and Skits” political satire productions at the Winnipeg Press Club.  She received the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002. Sources: Lives Lived, Globe and Mail July 20, 2009: Memorable Manitobans, Online (Accessed December 2011)
Georgina Binnie-Clark

Born Dorset, England April 25, 1871. Died London, England April 22, 1947. A journalist perhaps in search of a story, she decided to  came to visit her brother’s farm in Saskatchewan and fell in love with the area. She also felt that she would be a better farmer than her brother. In 1905 she purchased land in the Qu’Appelle Valley in Southern Saskatchewan. As a woman she was not eligible to apply for or receive the free land offered in Western Canada. She sold her grain in the open market and was a critic of privately controlled grain-marketing systems.  She would go to Ottawa in 1908 and protest for equality for women farmers. It was not until 1930 when the federal government handed land control over to the prairie provinces would single women farmers get their demands. Meanwhile in 1910,  Georgina opened her farm to train other single women wishing to learn farming. She also continued her writings and left behind a rich detailed account of social life and daily farm life in the settlement of the Canadian prairies. During World War l, the British Government appointed Georgina and 6others to train women to work the land. Her own personal war effort was a children’s book from which proceeds were used to help wounded solders and their horses. She began ladies dress making business in London to stabilize her finances while still managing her Canadian Farm. Her ashes were spread on her lands in Saskatchewan. Source: 100 more Canadian Heroines by Merna Forster (Dundurn 2011)

Victoria Grace Blackburn Born Quebec City, Quebec. Died March 4, 1928. She was the daughter of the editor and proprietor of the London Free Press, in London Ontario. Perhaps it was this family background that encouraged her to become a writer. She actually started her career as a teacher in schools in the United States. However she did turn to journalism using the pseudonym "Fanfan", she became one of Canada's top drama critics of her era. . She spent some years in New York City reporting back for the London Free Press. She also enjoyed writing and publishing poetry. After her death her novel The Manchild (Ottawa, 1930) was published.
Jean Blewett. (née McKishnie)  Born Scotia, Lake Erie, Ontario November 4, 1872. Died 1934.  She contributed articles to the Toronto Globe newspaper before joining the staff at that newspaper where she became editor of the homemaker's department.  She published a novel, Out of the depths. Heart songs in 1890 and later published several volumes of poetry in 1897, 1906 and 1922.  She retired from journalism and writing in 1925. 
Mabel Ellen Boultbee née Springer. Born Moodyville, British Columbia April 29, 1875. Died Vancouver, British Columbia, February 2, 1953. She was the first white child born on Burrard Inlet. After her marriage dissolved she ran a school with her sister, Eva in the 1890’s. She next took up journalist, a career she embraced for 30 years. She wrote for the women’s pages of the Vancouver Sun newspaper. During the 1930 and 1940’s the apartment of Mabel and Eva was renowned among the social elite. Source: http://vancouverhistory.ca whoswho (accessed June 2009)
Marsha Elaine Boulton

Born Toronto, Ontario 1952. She studied at the University of Guelph which is a little ironic. Guelph is known more as an agricultural school than for the arts and she lives on a sheep farm and is listed in the Canadian Who’s Who as a shepherd and an author. A successful journalist she combined her love of history and humour in her works. She won the Leacock Award for humorous writing in 1996. She has done regular columns in Maclean’s Magazine, and written CBC productions. She writes anecdotal Canadian history books which began with Just a Minute: Glimpses of Our Great Canadian Heritage (Toronto : McArthur & Co., 1994) In 1998 she was the YWCA Woman of Distinction.

Suzanne "Suzy"" Rochon Brunette

Born March 10, 1935, St. Adéle, Quebec. Died April 2, 2006. After high school Suzy attended business college in St. Jerome, Quebec. In 1950 St. Jerome radio hired her and by 20 she was writing newspaper columns as well as hosting 2 radio shows along with handling Public Relations for the radio stations. She began taking  Public Relations and marketing course at McGill University, Montreal. She travelled internationally to cover newsworthy event.. She tried taking modeling classes and moved to New York City to appear in Television commercials. By the 1960’s she had purchased an old lodge in the Laurentian Mountains and turned it into an art gallery. She met and married a radio station owner, Gordon Burnett and the couple settled in St. Catherines, Ontario. Once their daughter was in school , Suzy became involved with the production of a French language radio show which she produced in her own home studio. The Ontario Ministry of Culture picked up the show for stations across the province. She became the French culture expert for the CBC production of Morningside. By 1980 she used her avocation for art to raise awareness of First Nation’s issues with her new company Kakekalanicks Inc. She served as a Board member for TV Ontario, the educational public television. 1987 Rochon-Burnett was presented with an eagle feather in recognition of her efforts to save a totem pole carved by Squamish carver Chief Mathias Joe and in 2001 she received a Meritorious Service Award in recognition of her contributions to Native Friendship Centres in Ontario.  In 1995 she purchased a country music radio station in Welland, Ontario becoming the 1st Aboriginal person in Canada to own a private commercial radio station. She has received an Eagle Feather, Canada’s highest First Nations honour, A Woman of Distinction Award, the Governor’s General Confederacy Medal, the Order of Ontario. She is the 1st woman inducted into the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business Hall of fame. Source: Great women from our First Nations by Kelly Fournel (Second Story Press, 2007)
 

June Callwood. Born Chatham, Ontario. June 2, 1924.  A prominent magazine writer in the 1950's. In the 1960's she became an activist for such social causes as homeless youth and drug addicts.  She became an Officer in the Order of Canada in 1986.
Joyce Carter Born March 26, 1930 Toronto, Ontario . Died November 3, 2011, Toronto, Ontario.  She had no love of formal schooling and dropped out of high school to work at various jobs. She found her niche when she began reporting for the Kitchener-Waterloo Record newspaper. In her twenties she met fellow writer Clayton Derstine. The couple would marry with the birth of their only child in 1965. In the early 1960’s the couple made the move to Toronto after she had won the Judy Award for promoting Canadian Fashion. She wrote for the Globe and Mail and included interesting highlights of what workings behind the fashion world. Her first national byline appeared in the Globe and Mail November 14, 1962. In 1981 she was named Woman of the Year by Fashion Canada. Her work allowed her to jet off to world fashion capitals but her pay was not large for the results provided. A succinct reporter she came to the point directly. She did not write after her retirement. Source: Fashion writer had a healthy perspective…by Susan Ferrier Mackay, Globe and Mail January 10 2012. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.
 
Leigh Anne Chapple Born 1955. Died December 10, 2013, Ottawa, Ontario. Leigh Anne began working in news broadcasting in Pembroke, Ontario. The town is situated in the Ottawa valley and she was soon noticed by one of the workers at CTV in Ottawa. She began working as secretary to Max Keeping, a well known broadcaster at CJOH television, with the understanding that when a job in broadcasting opened up she would apply. She worked on the television program Regional Contact, providing stories from the Ottawa Valley that would be on interest to her Ottawa viewers. Then she became anchor for the late night news on CTV Ottawa. She worked at this job with true dedication for three decades becoming a familiar and welcome face to her viewers. She was also known for being the master of ceremonies, host or a guest auctioneer at local charities throughout the Valley. She helped the next generation come into the profession when she taught at Algonquin College. She was honest and forthright about such things as her struggle with weight but his showed that broadcasters need not all be slim like a career model.  Leigh Anne retired after 36 years on Ottawa television On May 4, 2012. Source: Obituary Ottawa Citizen, December 14, 2013. Suggestion submitted by Leah Monroe, Timmins, Ontario
 
J. Margot Brown Chester

Born Birmingham, England January 15, 1916. Died Winnipeg, Manitoba October 30, 2010.  As a child she immigrated to Manitoba with her family, and settled in the Sturgeon Creek area of St. James. On  October 24, 1936, she married Thomas P. Chester. After the birth of their three children, she began writing professionally in the mid-1950s. Her career in journalism began as the Charleswood correspondent for the St. James Leader. By 1965, she was Editor of the St. James Assiniboia News. She was later Editor-In-Chief of several weekly community newspapers, including Metro One, The Lance, The Herald, The Times and Thompson Times. As a volunteer  she was also a founding member of the Charleswood Historical Society and the Charleswood Sketch Club.  She was a member of the St. James Chamber of Commerce, The St. James Business and Professional Women’s Association and other local and political organizations. In 1997, she wrote a book on the history of St. Mary’s Anglican Church in celebration of its 75th anniversary. Sources: Obituary, Winnipeg Free Press, 6 November 2010 : Memorable Manitobans Online (Accessed November 2012)
 

Grace Cirocco

She studied for her B.A. at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario and earned her M.A. at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. She also took additional personal interest courses in California. She worked as a Director of Communications in the Canadian Government.  She worked as a broadcast journalist for the CBC in Toronto and Calgary. A linguist, she speaks English, Italian and French. She has traveled and loves international cuisine. She is married and has two children. In 1988 she earned the Award of Distinction in Broadcasting for her work with the Calgary winter Olympic Games. In 2001 she published her book Take the step, the Bridge will be there (Harper Collins). In 2003 she was the cover story for Women with Vision magazine. She provides help and guidance through workshops and retreats around the world. She is the founder and President of Grace Cirocco Inc. training and coaching company. In 2004 she founded the Goddess Club, a monthly workshop and therapy group in Oakville, Ontario. Sources Grace Cirocco.com Biography (accessed 2007) ; Interview with and inspiring woman by Penny in Discovering She May 14, 2011. Online (Accessed December 2011. Suggestion submitted by Joan Lowry.
 

Adrienne Louise Clarkson Born Hong Kong, February 10, 1939.  A television personality, journalist, novelist, public servant, and publisher are her main professions.  She even had her own television show “Adrienne Clarkson Presents”. She is an officer in the Order of Canada. She is the second woman, and first immigrant to have been appointed to the position of Governor General of Canada.
Bettie L. Cole Born 1912 (?),  Marbeton, Quebec. Died, 1983, Ottawa, Ontario. By 1908 Bettie was a working reporter with the Sherbrooke Record. She worked on the Women’s Pages. By 1941 she had relocated to Ottawa and until 1952 she worked with the Ottawa Citizen newspaper. Written on her grave stone is the sentence” 1st girl journalist on men’s general staff of the Ottawa Citizen.” While working as a journalist she lived with fellow journalist Rosa L. Shaw (1895-1981). In 1952 she switched professions working as a landscaper in Orleans, just outside of Ottawa, retaining in 1982. Source: “Section B, Range 6, Graves 20A & 25” by Marci Surkes, “Stories from the Grave”, Ottawa Citizen September 28, 2004.
 
Kathleen “Kit” Coleman. Born Galway, Ireland 1864. Died 1915. After the death of her first husband, Kit immigrated to Canada in 1884. She turned to journalism to support herself and her two children after the death of her second husband. Boarding a boat in Florida she landed in Cuba as the world’s first woman war correspondent in 1898 during the Spanish American War. She would work with the Toronto Mail newspaper until she retired. Her full page column not only discussed fashion but reported in her personal outspoken manner all the top topics of the day. She was part of the group of Canadian women Journalists who were sponsored to go to the St Louis World's Fair in 1904 and during the trip they established the Canadian Women's Press Club, with Kit as the first president.
 
Lenore Talbot Crawford

Born London, Ontario August 11, 1909. Died May 4, 1983. By 1933 she had earned her BA from the University of Western Ontario in London. She became a member of the newsroom staff of the London Free Press. From 1941 through 1974 she was a reporter. She was a critic of music art and cultural events. She maintained a weekly column and a digest of French Canadian editorial opinion that appeared in daily and weekly French language newspapers in both Ontario and Quebec. She was in the London Bureau of the Windsor Star newspaper and was the first woman reporter in the Windsor Star newsroom..
 

Sally Kathleen Creighton Née Murphy. Born July 20, 1903 Ashcroft, British Columbia. Died September 13, 1982. She earned her BA at the University of British Columbia and in 1924 she received her MA from the University of Toronto. From 1924 through 1945 she lectured in English literature at both the University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto. She served 9 years on the Senate at the University of British Columbia. From 1945 through 1968 she was a full time free lance script writer and broadcaster with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) radio and television. Source: Canadian Women of Note. Media Club of Canada. (Toronto: York University, 1994) no. 184 page 202.
 
Emily Ann McCausland Cummings née Short Born Port Hope, Canada West (Ontario) May 11, 1851. Died November 1, 1930. She began her working career as a journalist, working from 1893 through 1903 on the editorial staff of the Toronto Globe. From 1894 through 1910 she was the corresponding secretary of t the National Council of Women. In 1910 she received the honorary degree of D.C.L. from King's College, Windsor and became the first woman to receive an honorary degree from a Canadian University.
 
Irene Currie Love As a school girl, she won a prize in a writing competition run by the London Advertiser and she became a contributor to the newspaper. In 1904 she was a member of a group of women journalists sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railroad to travel and cover the St Louis World's Fair. It was during the train trip that she participated in the founding of the Canadian Women's Press Club. She would marry Elfred Archibald of Montreal where she joined the staff of the Montreal Star, using Margaret Currie as her byline.
 
Stacy Dales-Schuman

Born Brockville, Ontario. September 5, 1959. Her love of sports was evident during her years as a student at Thousand islands Secondary School where she participated in basketball provincial championships for Ontario. While at the University of Oklahoma in the USA she was twice named “Big 12” basketball player of the year. She was the highest Canadian ever drafted by the Woman's National Basketball Association where she played for the Washington Mystics. She retired from the court in 2004. In 2002 she bean working for ESPN as a studio sports analyst and has expanded her sports coverage since then. In 2004 USA Today named her Rookie analyst of the year, and in 2004 she has been named “Best new face”.
 

Sophia Sims Dalton

Born c1785. Died June 14, 1859. Married to Thomas Dalton in 1805 the family attempted to establish themselves in business in Newfoundland before moving to Kingston, Upper Canada in 1817. Again, the family attempted several businesses before establishing a newspaper , The Patriot and Farmers Monitor , November 12, 1829. The family decided to move the newspaper to York, now Toronto, in 1832 as The Patriot. . It is said that Sophia would edit her husband’s writings to avoid any legal issues. When Thomas died in 1840, Sophia took over the paper, becoming the first woman publisher of a Toronto newspaper, a position she maintained until the paper was sold in 1848. Dalton Road in Toronto is named in honour of the family.
 

Josephine Dandurand

nee Marchand Born St John, New Brunswick 1862. Died 1925. Like most early women writers she would use a pen name to sign her writing. She was known as Josette. A strong feminist she championed the role of women in Quebec society. In 1892 she founded le coin de feu which was the first women’s literary review in Canada. She was also a strong orator and was often called the female Laurier. Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier.  In 1898 she was the first Canadian woman to be made an officer of the French Academy in France. In 1900 she was the government appointed Canadian Commissioner to the famous Paris Exhibition. In 1901 in her work, Two systems of art, she proposed government provide funding for the arts. This was a full 50 years before the Canada Council of the Arts.

Mary Adelaide Dawson See Mary Adelaide Dawson Snider
Lotta Dempsey Born 1905. Died December 19, 1988. She followed her father’s advice and took up teaching as a respectable profession. It lasted 8 weeks, spent in a one room school in Four Corners Alberta! Her first marriage to Sid Richardson lasted 6 months in the fall of 1923. Not succeeding at the acceptable she followed her desires and landed a job on a newspaper. With no male reporters available the editor of the Edmonton Journal sent Dempsey off to collect a story and interview Charlotte Whitton, the newly appointed Director of the Canadian Welfare Council. Seeing that the new reporter was very nervous Whitton proceeded to provide the questions and the answers for the interview. Lotta was on her way to a remarkable career. She moved to the Edmonton Bulletin and from there to Toronto in 1935 where she landed a job with Chatelaine Magazine. Her writings were written with “Gusto’ under several pseudonyms including a more acceptable feature writing name of Jack Armstrong. In December 1936 she married Architect Richard Fisher and by 1938 she was a working mother with a new son. In the 40’s she worked for the War Time Prices Board and in the CBC Newsroom. In 1944 she was back at Chatelaine. She missed the daily bustle of newspapers and soon was working for the Globe and Mail moving in 1953 began a long career as columnist and editor at the Toronto Star. She as known for her large hats , big purses , smoking cigarettes in a long holder. Her hardy laughter no doubt helped her survive the discriminating world of male journalism. She won the Canadian Women’s Press Club Member’s Award in 1948, 1967 and 1976. In 1975 she was named to the News Hall of Fame. She was also a founder of the Voice of Women for Peace in 1960. Her auto biography No life for a lady was published in 1976. She retired from the Star in 1981. Source: Driving Miss Dempsey by Ryan Jennings the Ryerson Review of Journalism. Spring, 1999. Additional reading: Lotta Dempsey: the Lady was a star by Carolyn Davis Fisher (Toronto, Belsten Publishers, 1995)
Grace Elizabeth Denison née Sandys. Died February 1, 1914. A journalist she often used the pen name "Lady Gay". She was a frequent contributor to publication in Toronto including the Saturday Night Magazine. She also published a book entitled A Happy Holiday (Toronto 1890). In 1903 she produced the New Cook Book published in Toronto. In 1904 she was a member of a group of women journalists who were sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railway to travel and cover the St Louis World's Fair. It was during this train trip that the Canadian Women's Press Club was founded.
Flora Macdonald Denison Née Merrill. Born in North Hastings County, Ontario February 20(?) 1867 Died May 23, 1921, Toronto, Ontario. In order to support her love and desire for writing she ran a successful dressmaking business in Toronto. She married a travelling salesman and the couple had one son. The marriage was however short lived and only strengthened Flora’s belief in divorce and free love. As a young woman working as a costumer for the Robert Simpson company in Toronto  she witnessed firsthand the horrible conditions of the city’s sweat shops, and vowed to do what she could to change the lives of the women who worked in them. In 1903 she was introduced to the suffragist movement by Dr. Elizabeth Stowe, the first woman to practice medicine in Canada. In 1906, Flora attended the Copenhagen Conference as a delegate of the Dominion Women’s Enfranchisement Association, and in 1911- 1914 she was the president of the Canadian Suffragist Association. She worked tirelessly with others to organize “monster rallies” and send dozens of petitions to members of the legislature to improve the plight of women and get them the vote. She resigned her position due to her support for the more militant English suffragettes. Her strong life views were expressed in her regular column in the Toronto Sunday World, 1909-1913. During WWI she was a active and strong supporter of the Whitmanite movement which was a social and spiritual movement based on the works of Walt Whitman. In 1916 she published the Whitmanite magazine entitled The Sunset of Bon Echo from 1916-1920. Later she became a theosophist and in just before her deaths she participated in the Theosophist Social Reconstruction League. Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia, on line (Accessed March 2006)
Clara Dennis

 

Journalist & photographer

Born Truro, Nova Scotia 1881. Died February 16,1958. As a child her family moved to Halifax where her publisher father provided the town with its two major newspapers. In 1912 he was appointed to the Senate of Canada. Clara attended both Mount Allison University, Sackville and Dalhousie University, Halifax. She finished her studies with courses in stenography and typing and the Halifax Business College so that she might pursue appropriate employment for a young woman of her era. After a trip overseas she had a great desire to tour her home province. She took alone her camera to provide images of her travels. She would produce three major books of trips in Nova Scotia that would be published by Ryerson Press. Her home province travel writings also appeared in newspapers and magazines across the country informing all of Canada of the beauties of Nova Scotia. In 1939 she composed the provincial chapter on a souvenir booked produced for the King and Queen’s Royal Tour . She had a keen eye for photography and a charming writing style that left a descriptive legacy of her beloved home. Her photographs showed people. Nature. Places and architecture including lighthouses and even Cabbage houses on Tancook Island. Her promotion of the province was her passion which was recognized with and honourary doctor of Literature from Mount Allison University and a life membership in the Nova Scotia Branch of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. Her legacy of thousand of images is preserved in the Nova Scotia Archives.  Source: Clara Dennis: tours Nova Scotia - Biographical Sketch. Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management. http:///www.gov.ns.ca.nsarm/virtual/dennis/biography.asp?Language=English  (Accessed June 2008.)   Suggestion submitted by Cabot Yu, Ottawa, Ontario June 2008.

Rosaleen Diana Leslie Dickson née  Leslie Born Halifax, Nova Scotia 1921. She obtained her BA at Guilford College, North Carolina, U.S.A.1941.  Her Masters studies would wait until her family has grown. She received her Masters in Journalism at Carleton University 2003. As a young woman she and her husband, settled in Pontiac County, Quebec raising a family of 6 children while publishing and editing the weekly newspaper The Equity. Retiring from the paper she  taught journalism students at Ryerson University at 75 years of age. She continues to write feature articles for the Hill Times, the newspaper of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. She has co-authored, as well as written her own books that have included:  The Leslie-Dickson Family Histories,; HTML: the Basic book for people who would rather do it than read it and The Mother-in-law book. In 2004 she wrote a play One Hundred years of Daring, celebrating the founding of the Canadian Womens’ Press Club. She took to the internet as a natural extension of communication and enjoys writing for senior ‘Zines’ as well as developing and maintaining web sites for such auspicious groups as the National Press Club of Canada. Her personal web site displays the pride she has of her 18 grandchildren and (so far) 10 great grand children
Bronwyn Deborah Anne Drainie Born Toronto, Ontario June 8, 1945. After her master's studies at the University of Toronto she began her career in broadcasting by working at various radio stations in Ottawa and Toronto and then in England. Returning to Canada in 1975 she began working for C.B.C. As host of C.B.C. Radio "Sunday Morning" broadcast she won an ACTRA Award for Best Host Interview on Radio in 1980. As a freelance writer she has written for the Globe and Mail, Chatelaine, Books in Canada, and London Magazine. In 1987 she won National Magazine Award for her work in Toronto Life. She published a book in 1988 which was awarded the Ann Saddlemyer Book Award.
Monika Deol Born India. She was brought up on a dairy farm in Beausejour, Manitoba. She attended the University of Winnipeg before entering a career in broadcasting. When she first started her career she wanted to break the mould of the idea that most Indians were either extreme intellectuals, researchers or taxi drivers! She was a very popular host on Much Music's Electric Circus from 1988 through 1996. When she left the show some 35,000 people came to her farewell on her final episode. By 2002 she was working as a Vancouver news anchor for CityTV. In July 2003 she stepped down from City Pulse tonight to spend more time with her husband and children.
Christiane Duchesne Born Montreal, Quebec. August 12, 1949. She studies industrial design at an architectural school but ended up with a completely different career path. An author, translator and illustrator she has translated more than 400 titles and published more than 60 original books, seven of which she has illustrated herself! She also writes scripts for plans and recorded a series of broadcasts on legends and music for Radio Canada. To think that she does all of this with ease in both of Canada's official languages!!! Her works have be awarded the Governor General's Award (Victor , 1992) and in 1993 La 42e soeur de Bebert and 1995 La Bergerede chevaux won the Mr. Christie's Book Award.
Sara Jeanette Duncan Born Brantford, Canada West (Ontario) 1862. Died July 22, 1922. As a journalist she would use the pen name "Garth Grafton" as women journalists were not always accepted under their own names. She worked at the prestigious Washington Post  newspaper in the U.S.A. and returned to Canada to write for the Toronto Globe newspaper . She would be the author of some 20 books beginning with "A social departure" (London, 1890). In 1891 she married Charles Coates of the Indian Museum in Calcutta, India and spent much of her life in this corner of the Empire.
Agnes Mary Fitzgibbon née Bernard Born Barrie, Canada West 1862. Died July 17, 1933. After her marriage in 1882 she left for England with her husband but returned in 1894. As a journalist she used the pen name Lally Bernard. She also wrote the book "Canadian Doukabor Settlements (Toronto, 1899).
Muriel Flexman Born August 25, 1912. Died November 30, 2003. née Adams. She was the first female journalist to work at the Canadian Press. She was women's Editor at the Ottawa Citizen and President of the Canadian Women's Press Club. Wife of Lt. Col. Kenneth Flexman, they had five children.
Annie Harvie Ross Foster

Born February 15, 1875, Fredericton, New Brunswick. Died June 18, 1974, White Rock, British Columbia. In 1896 she earned her B.A. from the University of New Brunswick. She went on to train as a nurse at the Philadelphia Polyclinic Hospital receiving her diploma in 1901. She worked as a nurse in Woodstock, New Brunswick where she served as the 1st matron of Carlton County Hospital. Poor health forced her to leave her nursing career and she moved first to Saskatchewan in 1905 and then in 1908 on to British Columbia to teach. In 1915 she married William Garland Foster, editor of the Nelson Daily News. In 1916 she followed her husband to England where she nursed with the British Red Cross. Widowed during the war she returned to Canada eventually settling once again in Nelson British Columbia in 1919. She became President of the Great War Veterans Association. In 1920 she was the only woman delegate to the association’s annual convention. In 1923 she began writing for the Vancouver Daily Province. It was at this time that she also attempted unsuccessfully to have a career in politics. She continued writing producing such books as High Days and Holidays in Canada and the Makers of Canada. She also wrote a biography of poet Pauline Johnson entitled the Mohawk Princess in 1931. That same year she graduated from McGill University with a post graduate degree in Library Science. In 1932 she submitted the Mohawk Princess to earn a Master’s Degree from the University of New Brunsw3ick. In 1945 she married Patrick Hanley. She was active in the Vancouver Women’s Canadian Club and the Women’s Civic League. She became the 1st woman to serve on the University of New Brunswick Alumni executive. Source: ‘Annie Harvie Ross Foster.’ New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia. Online (Accessed May 2014)

Barbara Frum. née Rosberg Born Niagara Falls, New York U.S.A. September 8, 1937 Died March 26, 1992.. Barbara was a multi media journalist.  She wrote for numerous magazines, she was a host for the CBC Radio program “As it happens” also a host of CBC TV’s nightly current affairs program “The Journal”. She was Canada’s most respected and best-known interviewer.
Linda Frum Born January 13, 1963, Toronto, Ontario. Linda earned her B.A. from the McGill University, Montreal, in 1984. Linda is married to Howard Sokolowski and the couple has three children. She was a contributing editor for Maclean’s magazine and a columnist with the National Post newspaper. She has written two books: A guide to Canadian Universities published in 1987 and updated edition in 1990 and Barbara From: a daughter’s memoir, published in 1996.. Prime Minister Stephen Harper appointed Linda to the Senate of Canada in 2009. Linda is an active member of the Toronto community. She is vice chair of the board of Upper Canada College. She is also the honourary chair of Zareinu—a school for physically and developmentally challenged children. She is an honorary patron of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada.  In 2006, she was chair of the Women’s Division of the United Jewish Appeal. She is a past board member of the Canada Israel Committee, the Art Gallery of Ontario Foundation, and the Ontario Arts Council. She is a past recipient of the Golda Meir Leadership Award from the State of Israel bonds.  And in 2010, Yeshiva University awarded her a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa. She earned a Gemini Award in 1996 for Best Social-Political Documentary Program.  Source: Senator Linda Frum Online Accessed February 2012
Beatrice Sifton Nasmyth Furness Born 1884 Stratford, Ontario. Died October 23, 1977, Vancouver British Columbia. She graduated from the University of Toronto and became a concert pianist. She soon changed careers and followed journalism. She was a charter Member of the Vancouver Women’s Press Club in the early 1900’s and served as president in 1913.  Prior to World War l she travelled across the Canadian Prairies and campaigned for women’s suffrage. She left for London England in 1914 as publicity director for the Alberta government and continued promoting woman’s suffrage. She was the first woman to enter the British House of Lords press Gallery in London.  In 1917 she and her cousin Nell Sifton ran a successful election campaign for the Alberta legislature for Roberta MacAdams. She was one of only four Canadian women journalists allowed to tour behind the Canadian fighting lines in France. She not only interviewed Canadian service men but she also reported on the work women were doing in France. She was the only woman journalist accredited to cover the 1919 Peace Treaty negotiations in Paris, France. She was witness to the signing of the November 11, 1918 armistice. She married after the war and the couple returned to Canada and worked at the Montreal Gazette. She continued to write short stories and articles while raising her family.
Vickie Frances Gabereau née Filion. Born 1946. Brought up on Canada's west coast she moved to Toronto, Ontario to attend university at 18. By the age of 23 she had married a lion tamer from the circus and had two children. Her early jobs were somewhat eclectic. She drove cab, delivered elephants to Ohio and worked as a professional clown. She even ran as a candidate for the position of mayor of Toronto in 1974. However, once she had worked her first radio job she knew what her career would be. Working at C.B.C. Radio she had her own show for 12 years. In 1997 she made the switch to television talk show. She as won three ACTRA awards for best host interviewer and in 2003 she earned two Leo Awards for best talk show host. It is estimated that she has completed some 5000 interviews. She has written her autobiography, This Won't Hurt a Bit and also composed a cook book. She also finds time to be a grandma and to be honourary fundraising Chair for the Parkinson Society.
Dorothy Bruce Garbutt

née Coldeugh. Born Winnipeg, Manitoba December 16, 1897 Died February 18, 1988. She studied German at the University of Manitoba but it was journalism that would become her chosen career. She wrote fiction and non fiction works for newspapers, national and international magazines and the C.B.C Radio. She hosted a C.B.C Series Houses I have Known. She was honoured with numerous Manitoba historical and literary awards. In World War ll she was an official escort for British evacuee children who were sent to safer homes in Canada.

Mae Garnett

Born 1875 (?), London, Ontario. Died May 26, 1984, West Vancouver, British Columbia. Mae moved to Winnipeg in early 1900s as a CPR public relations officer for the Canadian Pacific Railway. She was one of the first female general news reporters in Western Canada, writing for the Albertan, Edmonton Bulletin and Vancouver News-Herald, before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1930. In 1962, retired as senior court reporter covering the British Columbia Supreme Court and county courts. She was also one of the first women to obtain a mortgage from Central Mortgage and Housing. She was a champion of women's rights at least two generations before the rise of the women's movement. Source: Vancouver Hall of Fame on line accessed December 2012

Amelia Beers Garvin née Warnock Born Galt, (Cambridge) Ontario 1878. Died September 7, 1956. Although she was married in 1912 she continued her career as a journalist. She used the name de plume Katherine Hale. Prior to her marriage she had been literary editor for the Toronto Mail and Empire newspaper. After her marriage she would concentrate on her poetry and for the next four decades would pen some 6 volumes of poetry. She also was the biographer for Isabella Valency Crawford and published the work in Toronto in 1923. Her second book of prose would be Legends of the St Lawrence published in 1926.
Alexandrine "Alex" Gibb Born 1891, Toronto, Ontario. Died December 15, 1958, Toronto, Ontario. She attended the private girls college, Havergal College, in Toronto. The College was known for its advance acceptance of girl’s sports in the early 20th century. She graduated in 1913. During World War l she worked as a secretary in Toronto. Although she was engaged to marry she never married after her fiancé was killed during the War. Her participation in sports continued after her college days. She enjoyed tennis, soft ball gold and track and field. She was a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs Ladies Basketball team which won Eastern Canadian championships from 1922-1924. She was becoming an articulated spokesperson for women in sports. During the 1920’s and 1930’s she was Canada’s most preeminent woman journalist. Working with the Toronto Daily Star she maintained a daily column entitled “No man’s land sport” for over 30 years. She began her journalist career in the 1920’s and it was May 1928 that she began her famous column. In 1919 she helped found the Ladies Ontario Basketball Association and served as president in 1925. In 1922 she founded the Canadian Ladies Athletic Club and served as the 1st president. In September 1925 the Women’s Amateur Athletic Union was created and Alex helped draft the Constitution. By December 7, 1926 the Women’s Amateur Athletic Foundation of Canada was founded with her encouragement. She served as President from 1928-1931. In 1928 she was the manager of the Canadian Women’s Olympic Team that would become known as the “Matchless Six”, bringing home gold, silver and Bronze medals in Track and field. In 1934 she had become assistant sport editor at the Toronto Star and she was appointed to be the only woman on the Ontario Athletic Commission. In 1935 she toured Russia and sent home to the Toronto Star articles on life in that country. Some of her stories were front page copy. She gave up her column with the star in 1940 when the country was at war. By 1951 she was accompanying Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinborough in their cross country Tour. In 1954 she was in the thick of the sports story of the year when she encouraged Marlyn Bell’s swim across Lake Ontario.
Sources: “Queen of the Ice Lanes: the Preston Rivulettes and Women’s Hockey in Canada 1931-1940” by Carly Adams in Sport History Review no. 39 pages 1-29 2008; 100 more Canadian Heroines by Merna Forster Dundurn Press, 2011.
Jane Gray

Born 1896. Died 1984. She began her broadcasting career in 1924 in London Ontario, at the Radio station for the Free Press. She came first in a list of 90 applicants for a cooking program on CFRB in Toronto. It is said of here that she was a born show-person and it did not bother her to wear an Indian costume to do a live commercial. In the 1940’s she was a main stay on CHML in Hamilton, Ontario with the daily Jane Gray Show. Later she would host the show on CHCH TV in Hamilton. Considered one of the first Canadian women with a career  in radio broadcasting, a true pioneer who is listed in the Canadian Awards in Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Source: http://broadcasting-history.ca  Accessed October 2011.  Name submitted by Jeannine Ouellette, Ottawa

Miriam Green Ellis

Born  1879, Rickville, New York, U.S.A. Died 1964, Saskatchewan. Her parents were Canadian and the family moved shortly after her birth to Athens, Ontario. She attended Bishop Strachan School in Toronto and  graduated from the Toronto Conservatory of Music. By 1904 the family lived in Edmonton, Alberta, and she moved on to work as a reporter in 1912 with the Prince Albert Post.  She married George Edward Ellis, who would become Inspectors of Schools for Alberta. When George became principal of Prince Albert Collegiate in Saskatchewan, Miriam became coach for the women’s hockey team. In 1913 she joined the Canadian Women’s Press Club and remained a lifelong member. By 1919 she was back in Edmonton and President of the Edmonton Branch of the CWPC. From 1919 through 1927 she was a reporter for the Edmonton Bulletin. She dubbed herself “Toad” after the character in the Wind in the Willows. She drove across the province for stories and often changed her own sparkplugs in her old second hand car. In 1927 her writing caught the eye of the Family Herald and Weekly Star where she worked until 1952. She retired in 1952 but still wrote freelance articles. While in Edmonton in 1922 she had financed her own journey to Aklavik, North West Territories on the edge of the Arctic Ocean and travelled with her typewriter and camera writing some 40 stories about her travels.  Her photos showed the life of peoples of northern Alberta. Her papers and her photographs were bequeathed to the University of Alberta providing a lasting archival legacy. Sources to read: Miriam Green Ellis: Champion of the West. Edmonton; University of Alberta Press, 2013.

Doris Giller Born Montreal, Quebec January 22, 1931. Died April 25, 1993. She began her working career as a secretary with a supermarket chain. She joined the staff of the Montreal Star newspaper in 1953 and thought persistence and hard work she  never accepted accepted the "Glass ceiling" that kept many women in low positions. She rose to be a reporter and editor at three of Canada's major daily newspapers. Her husband Jack Rabinovitch established the Giller Prize in 1994. It is Canada's premier literary prize for literary fiction.
Anne Marie Gleason

Madeleine

Born Rimouski, Quebec October 5, 1875. Died Montreal October 21, 1943. As a teenager she was writing for local newspapers using a multitude of pen names for her works. After the death of her father, she and her sister relocated to Ottawa to live with a brother. Here she continued writing with Le Temps. It was here that she first used the pen name “Madeleine” when she was writing the women’s column. She had taken over the job begun by “Francoise” / Robertine Barry.  It was during this time that she became a founding member and treasurer of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. That same year, 1904 she married Dr. Wilfred A. Huguenin. The couple would have one daughter. During World War l  Anne-Marie gave generously of her efforts with the French Red Cross society and l’aide a la France. For her efforts she received the French Medal of Recognition in 1920 and King Albert of Belgium presented her with a gold medal. In the 1920’s both her husband and her daughter died and Anne-Marie immersed herself in her work. After 19 years she left La Patrie and started editing La Revue Moderne. In 1928 she founded La Vie Canadienne which merged with La Revue Moderne, the ancestor of Chatelaine. After publishing several books she decided to compile a history of Canadian women and in 1938 she published Portraits de femmes. A second edition of the popular work was written for younger readers. Feminism was reflected her many works She called upon women to better themselves with education, and becoming interested and involved in Politics. She encouraged women to support their men and raise boys respectful of equality of the genders. Sources: Canadian Encyclopedia online Accessed July 2011:  Anne-Marie Gleason (Madeleine) by Amelia Baxter in Biographical Sketches of nine members of the Canadian Women’s Press Club . Ottawa, Media Club of Ottawa, 2011.  page 11-12

Alison Ruth Gordon Born New York, U.S.A. January 19, 1943.  As a journalist she worked for CBC Radio and the Toronto Star newspaper. She wrote a book about the Toronto Blue Jays but found her love to be writing mysteries centered on a sportswriter as a main character.  If you like mysteries, visit your own public library and look up these books.
Margaret “Miggsy” Graham.

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Born Upper Musquodoboit, Nova Scotia.  1870-1924.  At 15 she attended the Normal School at Truro, Nova Scotia. She taught for a few years and was ahead of her times in advocating voting privileges for women teachers in the provincial teacher’s association. In 1898 she became interested in mission work in the West Indies. She was unable to complete her five year term after a riding accident. She would spend some time in New York City with her journalist brother and by 1897 she was employed as a journalist herself at the Halifax Herald. She would move to Ottawa as the paper’s correspondent by 1904. She was part of the group of Canadian women Journalists who were sponsored to go to the St Louis World's Fair in 1904 and during the trip they established the Canadian Women's Press Club. After the 1904 World’s Fair she would marry and settle in Ottawa where she worked with such efforts as the Home for the Blind and the Protestant’s Infant Home.
Ellen Harris Born Winnipeg, Manitoba 1904 Died June 15, 1967. From the 1920’s she had an active interest in children’s theatre. In1930 she moved to Vancouver. From 1944 through 1952 she was a prominent radio broadcaster with Morning Visit on the CBC. In the 1950’s she became involved with the C.B.C school broadcasts. Active in the Vancouver Ballet Society she served at one point as President. She was part of the building committee of the University of British Columbia’s International House and was Public Relations Officer for the BCAA and Health Centre for Children. She was an active member of the Vancouver Zonta Club and also a member of the International Zonta Club. Source: The History of Metropolitan Vancouver – Hall of Fame http://www.vancouverhistory.ca (accessed June 2009)
Lucy Christie Harris. (née Irwin)  Born Newark, New Jersey U.S.A. November 21.  1907. Died 2002. This author soon found her true talent in writing children's' books. Often her stories are told in a Native setting, teaching the need and respect for balance of nature.  She has been awarded the Canadian Association of Children's Librarians book of the year award for "Raven's Cry" in 1966 and "Mouse Woman and the Vanished Princesses"  in 1976.  The "Trouble with Princesses" in 1980 won the Canada Council's Children's Literature Prize. In 2002 she was awarded the Mr. Christie's Book Award. There is even a Canadian juvenile literature book award named after her called the Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Book Prize. She is a Member of the Order of Canada. 
Susie Frances Harrison née Riley. Born Toronto 1859. Died May 8,1935. As an journalist and author she frequently used the pen name Seranus. She published several novels but is perhaps best remembered for her poetry. She was a master of the difficult poetic form known as villanelle. She published in her lifetime some 6 books of poetry. She also published the Canadian Birthday Book (Toronto, 1887).
Kate Simpson Hayes. Born Dalhousie, New Brunswick, 1856. Died 1945.  Like many young women of her generation she attended Normal School (Teachers college) in Fredericton and taught at various schools throughout the Maritimes until she married C. Bowman Simpson in 1882. Married women could not work as teachers. The couple had two children. Kate left her husband and moved to the prairies in 1885 living first in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan before settling in Regina. Here she opened a millinery shop and became organist at the Catholic Church.  Within a month of her arrival in the city she founded the Literary and Musical Society and began to write plays and prose using  the pseudonym of “Mary Markwell”. While in Regina she had a torrid affair with one Nicholas Flood Davin. He hired her to write for the Regina Leader as its first female reporter and he put her name forward for the position for legislative librarian, a post she maintained for 8 years.  Kate was separated but still married and refused to marry Davin even with the birth of their two Children in 1889 and 1892.  The Children were placed in living conditions outside their home. Davin married another and attempted to locate his two children to live with him. Kate moved to Winnipeg in 1899 where she was the editor of the women’s page of the Manitoba Free Press. She was part of the group of Canadian women Journalists who were sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railway to go to the St Louis World's Fair in 1904. During the trip they established the Canadian Women's Press Club.  She would be elected in 1906 as the second president of the C W P C. In 1907 she was sent overseas as a publicity writer for the CPR and served as an immigration commissioner. She would publish several books one of which Prairie Pot Pourri is considered the first book written and published in the Northwest Territories. * Some resources list her first name as Catherine or Kathleen. Sources: Canadian Who’s Who 1910 : City of Regina. Heritage. Online (Accessed January 2011)
Sophia Margaretta Hensley. (née Almon.)  Born Bridgetown, Nova Scotia May 31, 1866.Died February 10, 1946. This author and lecturer wrote of her interest in women’s issues and social tolerance.  She wrote periodical articles and 10 books under her own name but also under the pen name of Gordon Hart, J. Try Davies, and Almon Hensley.
Ella Cora Hind.

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Born Toronto, Ontario September 18, 1861.  Died October 6, 1942. A journalist and women’s rights activist she was the 1st western woman journalist.  Originally denied a job with the Winnipeg Free Press she would shortly become a respected agricultural editor for this same publication.  She was president of the Canadian Women’s Press Club in 1904. At the age of 75 she traveled around the world to observe and write about agricultural methods.
Dorothy Howarth Born 1912, Weburn, Saskatchewan. Like many young women of her era, Dorothy studied and became a teacher. She taught for 2 years on the Canadian Prairies before moving to a more challenging career. She joined the Regina Leader Post newspaper staff and worked her way up to a reporter for the women’s section of the newspaper. During World War 11 she headed for Toronto to work for the Toronto Telegram. In 1949 Dorothy wrote about Newfoundland’s entry into the Canadian Confederation and she won the Canadian Women’s Press Club Award which was a national newspaper award for feature writing.  In the 1950 Dorothy moved west and tried reporting for the Vancouver Sun but she felt she was closely controlled in the stories she covered and that her work was ‘savagely’ rewritten so she returned to the Toronto Telegram. In 1967 she married Dr. Harold ‘Hal’ Richardson and raised 2 stepchildren. By this time she felt that her style of journalism was no longer acceptable especially with the modern effects of television. Source: Chantal Guertin. ‘the 1st lady of razzmatazz: if Toronto’s newspapers in the 50’s was a circus, Dorothy Howarth was in the centre ring.’ In Ryerson Review of Journalism. June 2000.
 
Katherine Hughes Born Prince Edward Island. Died April 27, 1925. After completing her education in her home province she joined the staff of the Montreal Star in 1903. In 1904 she was a member of a group of Canadian women journalists who were sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railway to travel and cover the St Louis World's Fair. It was during this trip that she participated in the founding of the Canadian Women's Press Club. By 1906 she had moved west and was working with the Edmonton Bulletin. In 1908 she was appointed Provincial Archivist of Alberta. As well as having been a journalist she authored two biographies. Archbishop O’Brien: man and churchman (Ottawa, 1906) and Father Lacombe: the Black Robe voyageur (Toronto, 1911)
Joan "Joane" Elizabeth Humphry

 

J.J. McColl

Born December 24, 1936, Vancouver British Columbia. Died September 23, 2008 White Rock, British Columbia.  While in high school she enjoyed working on the school newspaper and being in the Drama group. She choose the professional name of J.J. McColl and began her radio career as Vancouver’s first woman D.J. hosting her own show on CJOR and later on CBC Radio. She worked with James Cavell the author and with James Beard as his CTV show in the 1960’s. She also created radio documentaries and authored an award winning 10 part drama called Mothering in the 1990’s. After a visit to Ireland she wrote a musical about a group of 50-something women at a high school reunion but the show never took off. In 2001 she dappled in drama again by acting in small roles such as being the real estate agent in Sean Penn’s The Pledge in 2001. At 65 years of age on June 22, 2002 she married Frank Howard. Source Broadcaster and writer… by Moira Dann, The Globe and Mail, October 20, 2008; Herstory: The Canadian Women’s Calendar 2012.
Judith Jasmin

Born 1916. Died October 20, 1972. Educated in France and in Montreal she would be described as a talented, brilliant determined and energetic pioneer of TV broadcasting. As a youth she joined a theatre group in Montreal and her talents took her to work in radio drama presentations where she gained acclaim. But her true love would become TV journalism. When medium of TV came along she would use her theatrical background to ultimate advantage in her presentation as an interviewer. providing good body language to compel attention. She and colleague Rene Levesque were credited with developing Quebec street journalism, taking reporting out of the newsroom to where the story action actually unfolded. She was a true pioneer who worked around the world on site to provide viewers with a the full report.

Michaelle Jean

Born September 6 1957 Port au Prince, Haiti.  She emigrated with her family in 1968 to live in Canada’s Province of Quebec. After she completed her Masters of Arts at the University of Montreal she took up teaching. She also worked for the betterment in the lives of women and children in crisis by contributing to the establishment of safe shelters. Taking some time off work,  she studied language arts in Italy. She is fluent in five languages, French, English, Spanish, Italian and Creole. Returning to Canada she began an energetic broadcast journalism career with Radio-Canada and earned the right to have her won show. Her journalistic efforts were put to use to create an awareness in human rights. Her efforts  gained her awards and recognition from the Human Rights League of Canada, Amnesty International , Canada and awards such as the Prix Mirelle-Lanctot, the Galaxi Award and being made a Citizen of Hounour by Montreal. She is married and has a daughter, Marie Eden. She was invested as Canada’s 27th and first Afro-Caribbean Governor General in September 2005.

Edith Josie Born Eagle, Alaska, U.S.A. December 8, 1921. Died Old Crow, Yukon January 31, 2010. She was a member of the Vuntut Gwitchin Tribe, “People of the Lakes. Along with regular schooling, Edith learned the traditional sills of her peoples related to hunting and living from the land. The family moved to the Yukon Territory upon the death of an Uncle. HeIn the Yukon she would raise tow of her three children and care for her aging parents. In 1957 she was appointed Justice of the Peace in her community of Old Crow. In 1962 Edith became a correspondent at the Whitehorse Star newspaper it was not long before her column “Here are the News” became popular and syndicated! She wrote of the everything and anything of interest to Old Crow and her readers were charmed with the description of everyday life in the Yukon bush. Her article went our each week on the local supply air route. Grammar, spelling and sentence structure with of little import to Edith. She wrote as she spoke. The writing style endeared her to her rapidly growing fan base which eventually reached across the globe, and was translated into several languages. Her work also became the base of several books. Her life was opened to CBC TV viewers, readers of magazines such as Weekenend Magazine and Life.  With all her success she remained humble and genuine. She received many honours such as the Canadian Centennial Medal of 1967, the Order of Canada in 1995 and the Aboriginal Achievement Award. She wrote her last column in 2005 but continued as an active elder in Old Crow.
Elizabeth "Betty" Kennedy Born Ottawa, Ontario 1926. As a teenager she worked at the Ottawa Citizen newspaper but in the 1940's she switched to radio. She began working for CFRA radio station in Toronto in 1959 where she worked for 27 years during which time she became one of the most popular radio personalities in Toronto.  She hosted her own she and was a panelist on the CBC Television program Front Page Challenge which ran from 1962-1995. She also has an extremely long list of credits of business appointments such as being a Director of Simpson's Ltd 1974-1979, Bank of Montreal, since 1975, Northern Telecom ltd, 1987, member of metro Toronto Hospital Planning Council 1965-70. She was the first woman chair person for the Advisory Committee for the University of Western Ontario (School of Journalism). She is also the mother of four children. She was awarded the Order of Canada in 1982 and became a member of the News Hall of Fame and the Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1983. June 20, 2000 she was appointed to the Senate of Canada.
Louise-Marguerite-Renaude Lapointe Born Disraeli, Quebec January 3, 1912. Her early studies in Music and foreign languages were useful to the journalist who first newspaper post saw her responsible for music criticism and women’s issues. She would be the first Canadian woman to become an editorial writer in 1965 which was marked with her being named “journalist of the year” In November 1971 she was appointed to the Senate of Canada where she would be the first French Canadian Woman to hold the position of Speaker of the Senate.
Agnes Christina Laut Born February 1871, Stanley Township, Huron County, Ontario. Died November 14, 1936. While still a toddler in 1873 her family relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba. Like many of her generation she attended Normal School (Teacher’s College) and when just 15 she was teaching in public schools. In 1889 she attended the University of Manitoba but ill health forced her to withdraw in her second year. In 1895 she began a 2 year stint with the Winnipeg Free Press. In 1898 she travelled across country submitting travel articles to various publications along the way. In 1901 she published a book, Lords of the North , which helped finance her relocation to Wassaic, New York, U.S.A. Continuing to writing she submitted articles to various North American publications including Financial Post, Saturday Evening Post, Review of Reviews and Collier’s. In 1909 she published the book The Canadian Commonwealth, and began writing for MacLean’s Magazine often items of political commentary which was unusual for a female journalist. Her commentary allowed Canadian to open their perspective to the wider North American scene. In all she would publish 24 books with a north American historical background. Source: The Pioneering Journalism of Agnes C. Laut During the Great War. Cleo’s Current August 18, 2014. Online (Accessed August 2014) ; Agnes C. Laut Funeral today., The Windsor Daily Star, November 17, 1936.
 
Lily Janet Laverock

Born 1880 (?),Edinburgh, Scotland. Died December 2, 1969, Duncan, British Columbia, She was the 1st woman to graduate in moral philosophy from McGill University, Montreal. She became the1st woman reporter in Vancouver with the World and Two years later, she was assigned women's editor of News-Advertiser. In 1909, founded Vancouver branch of Canadian Women's Press Club. An avid arts supporter, she promoted her 1st Celebrity Concert in 1921, bringing  world-famed performers to Vancouver packing the Denman Arena auditorium with acts like the Ballet Ruses de Monte Carlo and Belgian Royal Symphonic Band. Source: The Vancouver Hall of Fame online (Accessed November 2012)

Jessie Kerr Lawson Born Fifeshire, Scotland 1838. Died July 30, 1917. As a journalist she would first use the pen name Hugh Airlie for her regular column in the publication The Grip. In 1988 she would publish a book of these articles called the Epistles O' Hugh Airlie (Toronto, 1888). later she would use and Irish pen name, and continue her popular writing. She also published more books including Dr. Bruno's Wife (Toronto , 1893) and while she lived in Scotland,  the Harvest of Moloch ( London, 1908). The family, including ten children, returned to again live in Canada in 1911.  She turned her talents to poetry and published Lays and Lyrics (Toronto, 1913)
Marjorie "Marge" Anthony Linden Born October 10, 1935, Mill Village, Nova Scotia. Died April 1, 2013, Malibu, California. Her mother died when she was three but thanks to siblings she enjoyed an active childhood. She loved to sing and she sang and danced at 13 on radio. She began her career as a script assistant , communicator and singer for CBC TV in Halifax.  At 24 she relocated to Montreal singing and recording her own album. She soon joined radio as a commercial writer and then on to working for Television. She was the 1st female all night disc jockey on Montreal radio and the 1st woman to appear in regular programming on CFCF-TV. She worked for NBC in Houston , Texas before ending up in Hollywood managing the famous comedians the Smothers’ Brothers. She was at CBS New York prior to moving back to Canada in 1978. In the 1980’s she was v-p of network relations at CTV but her office door read “Vice Princess”. She was the 1st woman v-p in Canadian television. In 1984 she married for the third time to Judge Allen Linden and became a loving step mom to three daughters. She was the 1st female President of the Broadcasting Executive Society and in 1997 she was inducted into the Canadian Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. She had a gift with people and it was said that she charmed all whom she met including the Pop and Queen Elizabeth 11. She retired in 1990 1st to Ottawa and shortly after to Malibu , California.  Source: “Broadcast pioneer charmed all she met…” by Susan Ferrier MacKay and Allison Lawlor. The Globe and Mail May 4, 2013.
Anne Lindsay

(née Elliott) Born Vancouver, British Columbia 1943. Anne trained as a home economist earning her degree at the University of British Columbia. In 1966 she married Bob Lindsay and the couple would have 3 children. In the 1970’s she was a home Economist for the Toronto Daily Star newspaper. In 1979 she started writing for Canadian Living magazine. In 1984 she wrote a cook book for the Canadian Cancer Society and produced 5 additional cook books with and for charitable organizations. In 1992 she became nutrition editor for Canadian Living. Her work for magazines and her books provide accurate good nutrition by employing fun and a practical approach to healthy eating and living. In July 2003 she became a Member of the Order of Canada. Sources: Order of Canada online Accessed July 2011.

Genevieve Elsie Alice Lipsett-Skinner Born 1886 Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. Died January 29, 1935, Montreal, Quebec. The young Lipsett family moved to Toronto when Genevieve was just an infant. Later they relocated to Winnipeg and back to the U.S.A. settling in New York. From 1900-1903 she attended New York Normal School (Teachers College) and in 1904 she was off to Manitoba to teach. She found herself working from 1904 through 1917 with the Winnipeg Telegram newspaper as a reporter and editor to the “Sunshine Department of the paper. Outside of the office she served in 1909-10 as Secretary for the Winnipeg Branch of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. In 1910 she served as Director of the Anti-Tuberculosis Society. On June 6, 1911 she married Winnipeg businessman Robert Curtis Skinner, whom she stated was a staunch supporter of herself as a modern working woman. In 1912 she joined the Political Equality League, an organization dedicated to the advancement of women’s rights including the right to vote. In 1918 she and her younger brother Robert Lipsett started the Lipsett-skinner Press News Bureau specializing in Publicity Campaigns. It was a memorable year for Genevieve as she graduated in law from the University of Manitoba as the 1st qualified married woman in this field. By 1919 she saw the end of her marriage and was once again working back at the Telegram. In June 1920 she was an unsuccessful candidate for the Progressive Conservative party running for the Manitoba Provincial Legislature. Later that same year she began working for the Vancouver Sun Newspaper out of British Columbia. She would spend the next five years as an official Parliamentary correspondent in Ottawa, the 1st woman member of the Press gallery. By 1926 she was writing for the Montreal Star newspaper. In the late 1920’s she toured England and Ireland lecturing about the Dominion of Canada. In 1933 her picture was hung on the Ottawa Press Gallery wall along with her male colleagues. While in Montreal she served four years as President of the local branch of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. At her funeral in Montreal large floral displays were presented from the CWPC and Prime Minister Mackenzie King. Source: Memorable Manitobans. Online. (Accessed June 2014) ; “Associates Mourn Noted Journalist.” Montreal Gazette February 21, 1935 ; Obituary. Winnipeg Tribune January 30, 1935.
Dorothy Livesay. Born Winnipeg, Manitoba October 12, 1909.  Died December 29, 1996.  A journalist and literary critic, she is also known for her short stories of fiction and her poetry.  In 1944 she won the Governor General’s Award for her work Day and Night and again in 1947 for Poems of the People.  She was an Officer of the Order of Canada.
Jeannine Lock

Born Twin of Robert) April 16, 1925 Indian Head, Saskatchewan. Died February 26, 2012. While still in high school she became a correspondent for the Prince Albert Daily Herald. She continued her education and earned an Masters degree at the University of Saskatchewan in 1949. Taking a staff position at Chatelaine Magazine she moved to Toronto. By 1960 she was a reporter for the Toronto Star and was living in London, England as the Star’s 1st woman bureau chief. In 1964, back in Toronto she married Peter Reilly, a journalist. The couple moved to New York City, U.S.A. in 1967 when Mr. Reilly was the United Nation’s correspondent for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). While in New York City Jeannine wrote articles for the Toronto Star Weekly . In 1969 she moved to television journalism producing documentaries. In 1979 she turned her talents to drams producing her own scripts for TV. In 1987 she won an ACTRA Award for Chautauque Girl as the best program of the year. She retired in 1990 using her time to volunteer for causes such as saving Ramsden Park in Toronto. Source “A trailblazing Woman Journalist” by Susan Ferrier Mackay, The Globe and Mail, March 12, 2013.   Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.

Doris Clark Ludwig

Born October 25, 1909. Died October 6, 2005. She attended McGill University in Montreal in 1930 and then a Masters in Social Work from the University of Toronto. She began her career in Hamilton, Ontario in city planning. It was here that she began to build a reputation as a writer. She made the novel suggestion of having a professional report on social work  Her feature column, “Successful Living” was published in some 25 daily newspapers and more than 100 weeklies across North America 1960-1988.  A true pioneer, she bequeathed to those who followed in journalism an ideal of professionalism and independence. She settled down and married at 82 and enjoyed travelling with her husband until she became a widow at 92.  (Submitted by Connie Johnson)

Margaret Moran Dixon MacDougall/McDougall

(née Dixon) Born December 25, 1828, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Died October 22, 1899, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. When she was in her 20’s Margaret came to Canada with her mother, stepfather and siblings. She married Alexander Dougald McDougall (1827-1997) in 1852 and the couple had 6 children. The family settled in the Ottawa Valley where Margaret taught school. Her 1st publication was a book of poetry. She also wrote for local newspapers and in the early 1880’s while she was in Ireland as a correspondent for the Montreal Witness and the New York Witness. In 1882 she published her columns from Ireland in a book: The Letters of ‘Norah’ on her tour through Ireland. She told about her travels again in her novel Days of a Life in 1883. After the death of her husband Margaret Became an active member of the Baptist Home Missionary Society, working in Michigan and later in Montesano, Washington. Source: Obituary in Seattle Post Intelligencer. ; Margaret MacDougal in Canada’s Early Women Writers http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/singleitem/collection/ceww/id/338/rec/1(Accessed August 2014)
 

Fredelle Bruser Maynard (née Bruser) Born 1922 Foam Lake, Saskatchewan. Died October 3, 1989, Toronto, Ontario. When she was 9 years old her family moved into Winnipeg. After high school she became an award winning university student. She earned her B.A. at the University of Manitoba and then went on to the University of Toronto for her masters’ degree. She then went to  Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. where she earned her PhD at Radcliff (Harvard University). She married Max Maynard in 1948 and moved to Vermont were her husband was a professor at the University of Vermont. The couple had two daughters.  While she originally did not work at the university she began a successful career in journalism writing books and articles on child care. In the 1960’s and 1979’s she became a ghostwriter for Good Housekeeping Magazine writing columns including the Dr. Joyce Brother’s advice column. By 1952 she was hired as a lecturer at the University of New Hampshire in Continuing Education. She also taught a high school where she enjoyed nurturing young minds. In 1961-62 she lectured at the University. In 1972 she wrote an autobiographical volume called Raisins and Almonds. This was followed by the book, The Tree of Life. It was at this time her marriage folded.  Shortly after she met Toronto Businessman Sydney Bacon who would become her best friend and partner. Relocating to Toronto a Fredelle continued her success as a journalist, writing, lecturing and working on radio and television. In 1989 after being diagnosed with cancer, she died shortly after she and Sydney were married. An historic plaque has been erected by her house in Cabbagetown, an inner city neighborhood of Toronto. Sources: Cabbagetown People : The social History of a Canadian Inner City Neighborhood. Online (Accessed March 2014) ; Fredelle Bruser Maynard, Library, University of Manitoba, (Accessed March 2014)
Christina McCall Born Toronto, Ontario January 27, 1935. Died April 27, 2005. She stared work as a secretary to Maclean's Magazine but continued her education. After receiving her B.A. in English form the University of Toronto she continued at Maclean's, as a writer. As a pioneer in journalism she would be monumental is dispelling the idea that women could write only 'fluff''. She moved to Ottawa, for a while and took an interest in politics that would become a lifetime pursuit. While in Ottawa she covered political writings for both Chatelaine and Saturday Night Magazines. Back in Toronto with her family of three daughters she honed her writing skills and began more in depth projects of writing publications such as the history of the Liberal Party of Canada and a two volume biography of Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau.
Pearl McCarthy Born Toronto, Ontario 1895. Died March 25, 1964. She studied at the University of Toronto (B.A. 1917) and at Oxford University in London, England (B. Litt 1927). She returned to Canada and was a reporter for the Montreal Gazette and by 1937 she had married Colin Sabiston and had been appointed as Art Critic for the Toronto Globe and Mail newspaper. She wrote Leo Smith: a biographical Sketch (1937) and colaborated in an number of other books.
Margaret Stovel McWilliams

Born 1875, Toronto, Ontario Died April 12, 1952, Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1898 she graduated in political science from the University of Toronto. She began her journalism career in Detroit, Michigan before relocating to Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1910. She was a free lance journalist who often contributed to the Manitoba Free Press. In 1913 she became President of the University Woman’s Club and in 1919 she became the 1st President of the Canadian Federation of University Women. In 1922 she was President of the Woman’s Canadian Club. In 1933 she became the second woman to serve as alderman for the City of Winnipeg a position she held until 1940. She wrote three books relating to the history of Manitoba between 1928 and 1948. In 1943 she chaired the subcommittee on Post War Problems for Women for the Canadian Government committee on Reconstruction. For over 30 years she held regular “Current Event” classes for women in Winnipeg, promoting education in politics for women. She served as President of the Manitoba Historical Society from 1944-1948.  After her last book she married Roland F. McWilliams. In 1955 the Manitoba Historical Society established the Margaret McWilliams Awards that commemorates her contributions to Manitoba history. Source: Memorable Manitobans. Online (Accessed July 2014) ; Book Margaret McWilliams: an interwar feminist by Mary Kinnear (McGill-Queen’s Press, 1991)

Marie-Louise-Joséphine-Ester-Eliza Marmette.

Born Québec March 29, 1870 Died Montréal, Québec May 2, 1928. A granddaughter of known historian François Xavier Garneau there was no doubt of her literary birthright. As a child she was educated by religious sisters and is thought to have studied literature in Paris, France. July6, 1892 she married Donat Brodeur ( d. 1920) in Ottawa, Ontario. The couple settled in Montreal where they had a family of 3 sons and 5 daughters. She wrote articles , newspaper columns, poetry, short stories and novellas but it was not until after her death that her daughter, Marguerite, collected several pieces of her work and published a book, Figures et paysages (Montreal, 1931) Source: Dictionary of Canadian Biography Vol. XV online accessed August 2011.

Suhana Meharchand. Born April 22, 1962. She is a television news journalist who was inspired by her uncle, also a journalist, who ran an underground newspaper in her native South Africa. She is a graduate of Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto. Before becoming the host of the CBC Evening News in Toronto, she worked at TV stations in Hamilton, Windsor, and Ottawa   She has received 2 Gemini Award nominations for her work. 
Margaret Teresa Lally "Ma" Murray

Born 1888, Kansas, U.S.A. Died September 25, 1982 Fort St John, British Columbia. Born in Kansa she had the wanderlust and relocated to Western Canada in search of handsome cowboys. February 5, 1913 she married newspaper editor and future Member of Legislative Assembly George Matheson Murray (   -1961). In 1920 she started a magazine called Country Life in BC that lasted until 1927. In 1933 George is elected Liberal MLA for Lillooet British Columbia. Margaret, who was dubbed ‘Ma Murray’ by an Ontario journalist, began the Howe Sound News in Squamish. Her son Daniel began the Cariboo News in Williams Lake. In 1937 Ma and George went to the orient and witnessed an air raid on Shanghai. Bach home Ma wanted nothing to do with Lillooet being a reception area for interned Japanese Canadians and the family relocated to Fort St. John, a rough and ready settlement with a camp of 5000 U.S. soldiers. Here she began the Alaska Highway News on March 17, 1944. As editor Ma took the town and the province to task on bringing progress to the area. She traveled rough unfinished roads or flew to locations that provided stories for the newspaper. In her own words “We raised a lot of hell and had a lot of fun.” She was well known for her “salty” language. In 1971 she was presented with the Order of Canada. In 1988 the Murray home in Anmore British Columbia was donated to the town along with some of the family presses. Sources: “Ma Murray: Fighting Editor of the Peace” by Stephen Franklin, Weekend Magazine Vol. 8 No. 23, 1958

Emilie Musgrave Boswell Born November 14, 1886, Winnipeg, Manitoba.  Died May 18, 1955,Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1915 she started reporting for the women’s page of the Winnipeg Tribune, remaining there until 1945 when she became head librarian for the newspaper. She retired in 1948. She was a President of the Winnipeg Women’s Press Club. Sources: Memorable Manitobans. Profile by Gordon Goldsborough. Online (Accessed December 2011)
Georgina Alexandrina Newhall

(née Fraser) Born September 2, 1859, Galt Canada West (now Ontario). Died November 11, 1932, Calgary Alberta. She worked as a journalist in Toronto where she became the 1st editor of the woman’s Pages of the Toronto News. While in Toronto she developed an interest in problems facing working women and she introduced working women to the use of shorthand writing. She was the 1st woman teacher of Shorthand in Canada. In the 1880’s she served as assistant secretary to General Manager of the Northern Pacific Railroad. In 1884 she married Eugene Pierre Newhall. She also wrote poetry and some of her poems appeared in Selections from Scottish Canadian Poets. (Toronto: Imrie Graham, 1900). Source: Guide to the Literary Heritage of Waterloo and Wellington Counties. 1985.   

Joanne Strong Philpott

(née Stoddart). Born Toronto, Ontario October 5, 1930. Died Toronto, Ontario August 2, 2011. She had started her interest in journalism with working on her high school newspaper. After attending the University of Toronto she became a cub reporter for the Globe and Mail. She noticed that there was nothing in the paper for young mother and put forth the idea of a column. The Morning Coffee Club ran for 10 years and won the Canadian Women’s Press Award! This was the 60’s when young mothers were expected to stay home. Joanne Strong was mother to three children who were often featured in her column. She did decide to stay at home returning to her writing only when the last child was out of high school. She wrote informal columns for the Globe and Mail where she interviewed prominent Canadians such as Roberta Bondar, and returned to school to earn her Master’s Degree. She was appointed to the Governing Council of the University or Toronto. In the 1980’s she married a second time another writer and the couple enjoyed travelling the world. Source: Lives Lived. Globe and Mail. September 2011.  Nominated for this site by June Coxon

Jane Purves Born 1949, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Died June 1, 2013, Halifax, Nov Scotia. She graduated high school at 16 and entered university. Here she was introduced to drugs and by 19 she was married to Roderick MacEachern. Mother to a son and sported a drug addiction. She was able to turn her life around and in 1974 began working as a reporter at the Halifax Chronicle Herald. She excelled as a journalist and became the 1st woman to work as managing editor of the newspaper. During this time she also served on the boards for the Canadian Press and the National Newspaper awards. In 1999 she was up front about her addiction and ran successfully becoming a Member of the Legislative Assembly until 2003. She held cabinet positions in education and health as well as for the Status of Women. After being defeated in the 2003 election she returned to newspapers working as editor of the Halifax Daily News. She also served as chief of staff for premier Hamm and was an analyst for CBC who was known for being out front and frank. Source: “From heroin addict to Cabinet Minister” by Allison Lawlor in the Globe and Mail June 25, 2013
Joy Roberts-White Born March 24, 1910, England. Died  January 3, 2013, Edmonton, Alberta. Privately educated she decided against any of the accepted career choices and took off to be a reporter. She worked during her career for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Reuters  and the Canadian Television (CTV) She worked with Reuters from 1935 through 1944 interviewing such notables as Emperor Haile Selasie. During the war she was a member of the U.S. Air Force. From 1948-1954 she owned a PR organization serving such notables as the actress Deborah Kerr. She immigrated to Edmonton Alberta when she was 44 where she owned and operated an accessories and hat shop while she continued to serve as a reporter, playwright and a theatre reviewer and taught Radio and TV Arts at the University of Alberta! In the 1960’s she hitch hiked to the Distance Early Warning Line (DEW LINE) that was set up as defense for the north during the cold war, to interview Canadian troops. She was a proud member of the Canadian Woman’s Press Club. Source: Joy Roberts-White 1910-2013, The Ottawa Citizen January 26, 2013. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario
Heather Robertson

Born March 19, 1943, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died March 18, 2014, King City, Ontario.Heather attended the University of Manitoba and was a feisty editor of the university newspaper, The Manitoban. She went  on to post graduated studies at the Columbia University, New York, U.S.A. In 1966 she began work on her 1st published book Reservations are for Indians (1970). She worked after university for the Winnipeg Free Press and then moved to the Winnipeg Tribune and she stood her ground to write for more than women’s pages. Her writings were also found in the major journals and magazines in Canada such as : Maclean’s, Chatelaine, Toronto Life, Saturday Night, Equinox, Elm Street, Canadian Forum and others. In 1973 she met her life partner Andrew Marshall and became a stepmother and later a son arrived. Concerned with the lack of respect given to writers she became co-founder of both the Writer’s Union of Canada and the Professional Writer’s Association of Canada.  In 1983 she tried her had at fiction writing Willie: a Romance. This garnered her the Books Canada First Novel Award. She went on to turn her work into a trilogy with Lily: a Rhapsody in Red and in 1989 Igor: a Novel in Intrigue. In her own local she founded the King Township Archives. She had two close brushes with Cancer and in 2000 she became a certified caregiver visiting hospices in Canada, England and Africa. She wrote about in pending death from her experiences. In 20011 she earned the Outstanding Achievement Award from the National Magazine Awards Foundation. Source: “Heather Robertson, Writer, 72: Reform Spirit Drove her Work, Private Life…” by David Hayes. The Globe and Mail, April 4, 2014. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa.

Mattie Rotenberg

(née Levi) Born 1897, Toronto, Ontario. Died 1989, Toronto, Ontario. Evan as a child she exhibited a powerful desire for leaning and retention of knowledge. In 1921 she earned her BA in Mathematics and physics from the University of Toronto. In 1924 she married Meyer Rotenberg (1894-1958) a lawyer and businessman. The couple would have 5 children. By 1926 she had completed her doctorate and was the 1st woman and 1st Jew to earn a PhD in Physics at the University of Toronto. Her thesis “on the characteristics X-rays from light elements” was actually published in 1924. In     1929 she founded the Hillcrest Progressive School the 1st Jewish Day School in Toronto. She served as a director through to 1944. Mattie also enjoyed being a journalist, in 1930 she worked for the Jewish Standard writing a women’s column. From 1939 through 1966 she was a regular commentator on the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (C.B.C.) Trans Canada Matinee, which was dedicated to women’s issues. In 1945 her work was recognized by the Canadian Women’s Press Club (CWPC) with the presentation of the Memorial Award. In 1947 she covered the session at the United Nations and the Status of Women for the C.B.C.  By 1941 she had returned to the University of Toronto where until 1968 she was a demonstrator at the University physics laboratory. She was always a strong family oriented person who  made sure  the younger generations knew of their religious beliefs. Sources: Mattie Levi Rotenberg by Nessa Rapoport. We Remember, Jewish Women’s Archives. Online Accessed December 2012.

Dora Russell Born Change Islands, Newfoundland 1912. Died 1986. She originally studied to be a teacher and taught in St John's for a couple of years. She resigned and was married in 1935. For the next ten years she moved to various rural communities with her magistrate husband. In 1945 she became the first woman's editor of the Evening Telegram in St John's. She contributed columns, editorials and fictional works all from a woman's perspective. She supported local women in political, business, volunteer and domestic roles and stressed activities of the local women's community. She had a dispute with the political views and resigned. She cared for her five children and interested herself in astronomy, music and working with the Girl Guides. She was awarded the Queen's Jubilee Medal in 1977 for her work with the Girl Guides.
Annette Saint-Amant Frémont (Baptized Marie Jeanne Annie Saint-Amant) Born July 1, 1892 L’Avenir, Quebec. Died August 4, 1928, Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was educated by the sisters of L’Assomption and L’Ecole Norman (Teacher’s College) Laval graduating with diplomas in both English and French. She was diagnosed with tuberculosis and spent 2y years at a sanatorium in New York State, U.S.A. During this time she occasionally sent articles to newspapers in Montreal. IN 1914, Back in Canada she and her sister, Marie moved to Gravelbourg Saskatchewan to teach. In 1918 the editor of the first French language newspaper in the province, La Patriote de l”Ouest,  sought Annette out to become the editor of the women’s page. Annette moved to Prince Albert Saskatchewan and became the 1st francophone woman journalist in Saskatchewan. Her writings reached rural women throughout the province and her works included poems, stories along with helpful hints. Soon she created a second column, Le Coin des Enfants which encouraged children to write. On December 26, 1918 she married Donatien Frémont (  -1967) the assistant editor of the paper. The couple had one child. In 1923 the family moved to St. Boniface, Manitoba where Donatien was Chief Editor for La Liberté Annette soon became editor for the women’s section. After her death, Donatien produced a collection of her writings, L’ Art d’être heureuse. (Montréal 1929. Sources: Herstory, the Canadian Women’s Calendar 2006 Coteau Books, 2005; Dictionary of Canadian Biography online Accessed April 2013.
Henriette Saint-Jacques (née Dessaulles) Born St Hyacinthe, Canada East (Quebec) February 6, 1860. Died November 17, 1946. As a journalist she used the pen - name "Fadette" and wrote for Le Canada and Le Devoir newspapers. Between 1918 and 1933 she also published 3 books, one of which Lettres de Fadette (Montreal 1918) was a collection of many of her newspaper columns.
Mariruth Sarsfield

Born March 6, 1930, Montreal, Quebec. Died May 7, 2013, Toronto, Ontario. She was raised in the Black neighbourhood called Little Burgundy in Montreal, Quebec. Her mother often took family to museums  and as many musicals outings as they could afford. Mariruth attended Sir George Williams College and McGill University as well as studying journalism at Columbia University in New York City. She worked on Montreal’s TV news show, The hourglass and moved to the CBC as a researcher and on-air host. She worked at Expo 67 for Canada’s Centennial year and then she was posted to the United Nations in New York City. She continued her education earning a master’s degree from the University of Ghana in education. By the 1980’s she was serving as a governor at the CBC. She was awarded the Order of Quebec for her work. Both her daughter and her son died before she did, one from an accident and the other from breast cancer. She became active in MATCH the international women’s development and taught prisoners how to read. She also was an active member of the Canadian Women’s Press Club/Media Club of Canada. In 1975 her 1st marriage to Cullen Hodge disintegrated and she remarried to Dominick Sarsfield, a director with the Canadian International Development Agency. The couple lived in Nairobi and she worked for the Department of External Affairs. In 1997 she penned an autobiographical novel No crystal star which was republished by Women’s Press in 2005. Source: Mariruth Sarsfield from Little Burgundy to Expo 67 by Elizabeth Renzetti, Globe and Mail June 12, 2013. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.

Mary Shadd Cary. Born Wilmington, Delaware U.S.A. October 9, 1823. Born a free black, Mary Shadd Cary worked with black refugees in Windsor one of the Canadian ends of the famous "Underground Railway" for escaped slaves. In 1883 she became the first black woman in North America who was an editor of a newspaper when she established the "Provincial Freeman" a weekly paper designed to cover the lives of Canadian blacks and promote the cause of black refugees to Canada. A biography may be found at: http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/2/12/h12-204-e.html
Rosa  L. Shaw Born 1895 (?). Died 1981, Ottawa, Ontario. Rosa earned her teaching certificate at Normal School in Montreal, Quebec. She taught for two years but was unsatisfied with the profession. She was a reporter in London, England for Vogue magazine and by the late 1920’s she had returned to Canada. She worked for 14 years with the Montreal Gazette as their 1st woman news editor. She relocated to Ottawa to work with the Canadian Welfare Council where no doubt she grew to know Charlotte Whitton. Rosa lived with fellow reporter Bettie L. Cole (  -1989).. After being President of the Canadian Women’s Press Club Montreal Branch she went on in 1938 to be president of the national Canadian Womens Press Club. In 1957 she authored the book Proud Heritage: a history of the National Council of Women. Source: “Section B, Range 6, Graves 20A & 25” by Marci Surkes, “Stories from the Grave”, Ottawa Citizen September 28, 2004.
Geraldine Sherman. Born June 17. This Canadian journalist and short story writer has had her works published in Saturday Night magazine, Toronto Life magazine and the Globe and Mail  and  Ottawa Citizen newspapers. She has had a career as a radio producer for the Canadian Broadcasting  Corporation and as a town planner. She first had dreams about visiting Japan when she was 14. It took thirty years before her dream would come true. She has written about her experience in Japan Diaries : A travel memoir (McAuthur & Co. 1999.)
Mary Adelaide Dawson Snider Born 1879, Lambton, County, Ontario. Died September 3, 1932. Mary joined the workforce at the Toronto Evening Telegram in 1901 as the paper’s 1st female reporter. She worked as a columnist for the women’s pages as well as serving as secretary for the editor. In 1904 Mary was 1 of the 16 women who travelled by train to cover the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. On the return train trip the women formed the Canadian Women’s Press Club which would endure for 100 years. Mary was not credited with a byline for her reports from the World’s Fair. In 1908 she married reporter and historian Charles Henry Jeremiah (Jerry) Snider (1897-1971). In 1912, posing as a nurse and slipping through security lines, Mary reported meeting the ship Carpathia’ which brought survivors of the fateful Titanic to New York City, U.S. A. This time she was credited with her own byline! In 1919 she covered the Winnipeg General Strike and filed copies of her stories to the Telegram from Minnesota to ensure the arrival uninterrupted by Canadian telegraphers. During World War l she was in Charge of women working at a Toronto munitions Plant. Mary continued writing for the Toronto Telegram until her death. Sources: Linda Kay. The Sweet Sixteen. (McGill-Queens University Press, 2012) : Marjory Lang. Women who made the news. McGill Queen’s University Press, 1999.
 
Jean Southworth

Born Omemee, Ontario 1923. Died May 23, 2008.Born Omemee, Ontario 1923. Died May 23, 2008. Raised on a dairy farm her heart turned to music as a youth. She went on to study history at the University of Toronto and began her working career on an Oshawa newspaper. She joined the Ottawa Journal in 1948 when she was one of the few women on staff. Jean said she learned to smoke and wore pants and was soon putting her legs up on the desk the way the men did! She wrote about the Ottawa arts and music scene for the Journal until it closed in 1988. She continued writing for other publications including the Encyclopedia of Music in Canada. Up until her death she was a member of the Media Club of Ottawa, formerly the Canadian Womens Press club. For some 50 years Jean shared her music as assistant organist at the Christ Church Cathedral in Ottawa. The Journal was a morning paper and no doubt Jean worked late into the night as a reporter. Music often wafted from the Cathedral after midnight as Jean played. She was active in the Royal Canadian College of Organists and a board member of the Ottawa Kiwanis Music Festival which offers a scholarship in her name. She wrote of youth and their musical talents and encouraged such hopefuls as Angela Hewitt. Along with writing and music, Jean had a passion for tennis, a game she played until she was 79 years old!  Source Obituary- Jean Southworth: Writer was tireless supporter of Ottawa’s music community by Steven Mazey Ottawa Citizen Saturday June 7, 2008..  

Rosemary Speirs

Political activist

Born 1940. Rosemary enjoyed being out doors when she was growing up and was a junior member of the Toronto Field Naturalists. A historian with a PhD from the University of Toronto, Rosemary  has been a professional journalist as Ottawa Bureau Chief and Political columnist for the Toronto Star newspaper. In the 1980’s she worked with the Committee of 94 which wanted to have women working in the House of Commons. The goal was to have 94 women, or at that time ½ of the membership of the House of Commons. This group fell short of it’s goal but Rosemary stayed true to the idea of move women in politics.  She is founder and chair of Equal Voice/A voix égales, an influential national advocacy for groups for the election of more women to every level of government in Canada. She also founded the Women’s Political ConneXion linking women’s groups and individuals in support of electing more women. She has earned the YWCA Woman of Distinction Award and October 2004 she was presented with the Governor’s General Award commemorating the Persons Case. Her interest in politics has also led her to write a book: Out of the Blue: A history of Ontario Politics. Maintaining her love of nature she has also been President of the Board of Directors of Ontario Nature, one of Canada’s largest environmental organizations. Source: http://ywca.zuka.net/women_distinction/2006/wod2006_civic_engagement.htm  Accessed July 2011

Ellen Elizabeth Spragge née Cameron Born Toronto, Canada West (Ontario) 1854. Died May 2, 1932. She married Arthur Spragge and contrary to many women of her era she continued her career as a writer. While she enjoyed being a known artist with her water colours she is best remembered as a free lance journalist. In 1886 she journeyed to Winnipeg to board the first cross Canada train on the Canadian Pacific Railway. She would write and publish her exploits on this trip, during which time she traveled alone with a bunch of rather rambunctious male journalists. From Ontario to the Pacific by CPR was published in Toronto in 1887. The book is available in electronic format at canadiana online.
Edith McConnell Stewart-Murray

Born 1900, Montreal, Quebec. Died November. 22, 1965, Victoria, British Columbia. She moved to British Columbia with her family in 1904.  Her father, John P. (Black Jack) McConnell, was co-founded the Morning Sun, the forerunner of the Vancouver Sun  in 1912. Edith worked as a columnist and women's page editor of the Sun and Vancouver News-Herald for 40 years. Her best known column was Let's Go Shopping.  She was a life member, Canadian Women's Press Club. Source: Vancouver Hall of Fame Online (Accessed November 2012

Carol Taylor Born Toronto, Ontario 1945. While a student at the University of Toronto she was named Miss Toronto 1964 and was invited to be a co-host on the CFTO-TV show After Four. Her broadcasting career was off to a running start. In 1972 she was one of the hosts on the new Canada AM on the CTV network. In 1973 she was the first woman to move into the high profile show W5. Married in 1976 the newlyweds settled in British Columbia where she became a well known broadcast personality. In 1986 she was elected to the Vancouver City Council. In 2000 she became an Officer of the Order of Canada and she is included in the Canadian Broadcasters Hall of Fame.
Agnes Elizabeth Wetherald Born Rockwood, Canada West (Ontario) April 26, 1857. Died March 9, 1940. She was educated at Pickering College in Pickering Ontario. She began a career as a journalist o the staff of the Toronto Globe but would spend most of her career as a freelance writer. She also enjoyed writing verse and would publish some five volumes of verse for which she was well know.
Florence "Flo" Whyard Born London, Ontario January 13, 1917. A journalist who graduated in 1938 from the University of Western Ontario she holds one of her life highlights as receiving an honorary LLD from the Western Faculty of Journalism. A longtime northerner who was editor of the Whitehorse Star in the Yukon. It is one of only an handful of independent daily newspapers in Canada. During World War 11 she joined the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service where she traveled to write about Canadian Wrens wherever they were serving in Canada and the Eastern U.S. Oh yes she was at the same time editor of the WRCNS Magazine. She earned promotions and later worked as a commissioned officer our of the Naval Information Office in Ottawa where she would meet her husband to be who hailed from northern Canada. She would become an elected member of the Yukon Territorial Council where she found herself in cabinet! After her term in office she returned to her editorial work to help continue the battle for political recognition of the Yukon. She would become Ambassador of the Yukon, a position that would replace the Yukon Commissioner was absent. In retirement, along with her husband and his camera she had turned to publishing works to inform people of her beloved north and building up a historical collection now hosed in the Yukon Archives. Now a widow she continues to write and preside on boards benefiting the daily life of people of the Yukon.
Playwrights     back
Marguerite Martha Allan Born Montreal, Quebec 1895. Died March 31, 1942. A amateur dramatist and playwrite, she organized the Montreal Repertory Theatre which became on of the most successful amateur dramatic groups in all Canada. In 1935 she was presented with the Canadian Drama Award for her outstanding service to the development in Canadian theatre. She wrote three plays. The Dominion Drama Festival awards the Martha Allan Trophy annual award for the best visual performance.
Carol Bolt

Born Winnipeg, Manitoba August 25, 1941. Died November 28, 2000. Carol grew up in mining towns of Manitoba, Ontario and British Columbia. In 1961 she earned her BA at the e University of British Columbia. She became a writer for children’s television including such series as Tales of the Klondike; the Raccoons and Fragle Rock. A founding member of the Playwrights Union of Canada by the 1970’s she had settled writing for the Toronto Theatre scene. One of her works, Red Emma, about the life of a Russian anarchist and suffragette, Emma Goldman, was aired on CBC TV and by 1995 was adapted as an opera. Many of her works took place in Canadian locations. One Night Stand, from Taragon Theatre in 1977 became her most often produced work and the movie won 3 Canadian film awards in 1978. In 1989 Bolt herself won the Chalmers Award for Icetime, a story about a 12 year old girl wanting to play hockey. Again in the 1970’s she was playwright in residence at the University of Toronto. In 2010 a collection of her plays was published: Reading Carol Bolt. Sources: Canadian Theatre Encyclopedia Online http://www.Canadiantheatre.come (Accessed June 2011); Oxford Companion to Canadian Theatre Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Sarah Anne Curzon

(née Vincent) Born 1833, Birmingham, England. Died November 6, 1898. In 1858 she married Robert Curzon and in the early 1860’s the young couple settled in Toronto. She believed in access to higher education for women, female suffrage and equal property rights for women. As a journalist she would put her thoughts in written support of her beliefs. In November 1876 she, along with Dr. Emily Stowe, founded the Toronto Women’s Literacy Club which was actually a platform for women’s rights. She enjoyed writing history to prove it was not just a male domain. In 1881 she was the editor of the Canadian Citizen, Canada’s 1st prohibitionist paper. She also wrote a column in the paper concerning women’s issues, such as the need for accessible education. One of her early plays “The Sweet Girl Graduate” mocked the idea that women were not smart enough to study at University. On October 2, 1884 and Order in Council admitted women to University College in Toronto! In 1887 she published a play that she had written a few years earlier, Laura Secord: the Heroine of 1812. It is sometimes referred to as Canada’s 1st feminist play. It is largely responsible for the popularity of the Secord story. In 1895 she was a cofounder of the Women’s History Society and served as the 1st President. An historic plaque of a local history group marks her home in Cabbagetown, an inner city neighborhood of Toronto. Sources: Cabbagetown People : The social History of a Canadian Inner City Neighborhood. Online (Accessed March 2014) ; Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online (Accessed March 2014) ; The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (Accessed March 2014)

Marie Laberge. Born Quebec City, Quebec November 29, 1950. An actress, playwright, director and novelist are the career adventures that she has embarked on in her life so far.  She received the Governor General's Award for drama in 1981.  Many of her works have done well  translated into English and her work has often been popular in France.  Her themes emphasize feminist principles. 
Elizabeth Minnie "Betty" Lambert. (née Lee). Born Calgary, Alberta August 23, 1933. Died November 4, 1983  This playwright wrote some 70 works for adults and children to watch and listen to on radio, TV, and stage.  She also wrote novels.
Rina Lasnier. Born St-Grégoire d'Iberville, Quebec August 6, 1915.  A youthful playwright who blossomed into a renowned poet. She published her 1st verses in 1941.  She won the Molson Prize in 1971, and the Prix France –Canada in 1973.  All her work is written in her beloved French language.
Wendy Lill Born Vancouver, British Columbia November 2, 1950. Born on the Canadian west coast she was raised in Ontario and choose to live as an adult in Nova Scotia. She brings a lot of knowledge of living across her country to her writings. She described herself as a playwright, journalist, community-development worker and an historian on her web site when she served as a member of the Canadian Parliament from 1997 to 2004. She was elected in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia where she ran as a candidate for the New Democratic Party. She has won two ACTRA Awards and she has been nominated 4 times for the Governor General Drama Award. Many of her plays have an historical setting. While she was in parliament a video about her was produced Wendy Lill : Playwright in Parliament (Montreal, Ralston Productions/National Film Board, 1999) 
Conni Louise Massing. Born November 20, 1958. This writer has many screenwriting credits with the National Film Board of Canada and CBC TV. She has written for the TV program "North of 60" and has some 20 produced stage works to her credit. In 1994-5 she was the playwright in residence at the National Theatre School of Canada.
Gwendolyn Ringwood. (née Phares) Born Anatone, Washington U.S.A. August 13, 1910. Died May 24, 1984. In 1941 she received the Governor General's Award for outstanding service to Canadian drama. She was the first Canadian playwright to publish a volume of collected plays in 1982.
Erika Ritter Born Regina, Saskatchewan April 28, 1948. She began her studies with drama at McGill University and then she earned a Masters degree in drama from the University of Toronto, 1970. She taught briefly in Montreal in the mid-70's, prior to embarking upon a freelance writing career. She has written plays, radio dramas, humorous essays, fiction and radio broadcasts. Publications include: The Hidden Life of Humans (Toronto: Key Porter Books, 1997); Ritter in Residence (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1987); Urban Scrawl (Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1984) and Automatic Pilot (1980). Her awards include 2 ACTRA Awards,  in 1986 and 1981, and the Chalmers Canadian Play Award for Automatic Pilot in 1980. She is the familiar radio-friendly voice of CBC Radio's, The Arts Report, heard weekdays and has been a cultural mainstay on this country’s airwaves for many years.
Judith Thompson. Judith Claire Francesca Marie Bernadette Thompson. Born Montreal, Quebec September 20, 1954.  After graduating from Queen’s University, Kingston, 1976 and the National Theatre School, Montreal, 1979 she turned to writing plays as her form of expression.  In 1987 “I Am Yours” won her a 2nd Governor General’s Award and also the Chalmers Canadian Play Award. Additional recognition includes the Order of Canada in 2005 and being the first Canadian to win the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, 2008. Her plays have been performed in both official languages across Canada as well as worldwide.  She has expanded into radio, screenplays, and plays for youth. Her plays depict a graphic darker side of modern life but also provide hope. She is currently teaching at the University of Guelph, Ontario and enjoys life in Toronto with her husband and five children.  Source: Judith Thompson by Anne Nothof, Canadian Theatre Encyclopedia online ( accessed May 2008) :
Poets     back
Shari Andrews

Born 1953, New Denmark, New Brunswick. After attending a Maritime Writers’ workshop at the University of New Brunswick in 1987 she began to write poetry seriously. In 1990 she produced a chapbook of her peoms. She attended various writing workshops by noted authors and in 1999 she published her 1st full length work of collected poems, the Stone Cloak followed in 2001 with another book of poems. In 2005 her third book was followed by the publication Walking in the Sky. Her individual works have appeared in such magazines as Canadian Literature and Fiddlehead. She has served on the executive t the Writers’ Federation of New Brunswick. Her works have garnered numerous awards including the Alfred G. Bailey Prize. Source:  ‘Shari Andrews’ by Carissa St. Armand. New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia. Online (Accessed May 2014)

Margaret Avison. Born Galt (now Cambridge), Ontario April 23, 1918. She was a poet, librarian, historian and social worker. She won the Governor General's Award for literature in 1960. She used her writing to bring history alive for young readers in her "History of Ontario".
Augusta Baldwin Born St Johns, Lower Canada 1821. Died May 9,1884. The daughter of the first Anglican rector of St. Johns, Lower Canada she was the author of a volume of Poems (Montreal 1859)
Ruth Elizabeth Borson  After her education in the U.S. she moved to study at the University of British Columbia. She began publishing her poetry in 1977.  To date she has published 10 collections of her work
Louise Bowman (née Morey). Born Sherbrooke, Quebec 1882. Died September 28, 1944. She enjoyed writing poems and would publish three volumes between 1922 and 1938 including Dress Tapestries (Toronto, 1924)
Di Brandt Born Winkler, Manitoba 1952. After completing studies at the University of Manitoba, the University of Toronto and earning her PhD in English Literature at the University of Manitoba she turned her writing talents to editing the poetry magazine, Prairie Fire. Her own poetry is also well recognized. She has won the Gerald H. Lampert Memorial Award for the best first book by a Canadian poet, the Canadian Authors' Association national Poetry Award and the Dillson Commonwealth Poetry. Her book Questions I asked my mother, published in 1987 won the Governor General's Award for Poetry.
Elizabeth "Betty" Brewster Born August 26, 1922 Chipman, New Brunswick. Died December 26, 2012 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. As a child she was considered a low learner when it came to letters and number and as a result she was kept at home. While at home she began to enjoy books and read everything from Eaton’s catalogue to the complete works of Shakespeare. At 12 her first poem was published in a local newspaper. She would go on to attend the University of New Brunswick on scholarship. In 1946 she attended Radcliffe College in the U.S.A. and earned her Master’s in literature. In 1947 while teaching in Cobourg, Ontario she fell off a horse and broke her back forcing her to return home to Fredericton to recuperate. She returned to formal studies attending Indiana University (where she later earned her PhD) and King’s College in London England. In the 1940’s and 1950’s she was one of the few women poets who were published in Canada. She was a founding member of the literary journal The Fiddlehead. In the 1950’s teaching jobs in Canada were scarce so in hopes of becoming a secretary she attended Business College. The jobs that followed were boring so she studied at Library School at the University of Toronto where she won the E.J. Pratt Award in Poetry. She took a teaching position replacing Margaret Atwood at the University of Alberta. She moved to the University of Saskatchewan in 1972 until she retired in 1990. She won the Saskatchewan Book Award twice and the Saskatchewan Lifetime Achievement Award. She also received the Queen’s Jubilee Medal. Source: “Poet’s journey to self awareness resulted in a prolific output of verse” by Noreen Shanahan in The Globe and Mail, February 5, 2013. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.
Nicole Brossard. (married name Soubliére)  Born Montreal, Quebec November 27, 1943.  In 1965 she published her first book , La Barre du jour. She concentrated on organizing the jazz and poetry reading for the Youth Pavilion at Expo '67. She obtained her Masters degree in 1972 and became a mother in 1975. Motherhood did not slow her down in 1975 she won the Governor General's Award for poetry. She would win again in 1984. After founding the feminist editorial collective Les Tetes de Pioche and touring Europe she founded her own publishing house.  
Anne Carson Born Toronto, Ontario June 21, 1950. A distant descendant of Egerton Ryerson ( the nineteenth century Ontario educator for whom Ryerson Polytechnical University is named) she was perhaps destined to leave her mark. She currently teaches Classics at McGill University in Montreal. This was her personal preference for studies when she earned her PhD at the University of Toronto. As well as being a distinguished professor she is a renowned poet. She blends theories, ideas and themes from her fields of studies and modernizes them in her poems and essays. She has several published books and has won the Lannan Award in 1996, the Puscart Prize in 1997, and the Gugenheim and Macarther Fellowships in 1998 and 2000 and the Griffin Poetry Prize in 2001.
Helena Jane Coleman. Born April 28, 1860, Newcastle, Canada West (Ontario). Died 1953 . As an adult she lived with her brother, A.P. Coleman, in Toronto and spent summer holidays at their cottage, “Pinehurst”, in the Thousand Islands. She  was educated at Ontario Ladies’ College, Whitby, where she received the Gold Medal in Music, and became the Head of its Music Department (1880–1892). She took a one-year leave of absence to pursue post-graduate studies in music in Berlin, Germany. She   contributed poems to a large number of Canadian and American journals, including Atlantic Monthly, The Canadian Magazine and Harper’s Weekly. She was a member of the Author’s Society, the Canadian Author’s Association, the Rose Society, and the University Women’s Club in Toronto. She did not publish under her own name until the release of Songs and Sonnets in 1906. During her writing career she would use some 20 Pseudonyms such as Caleb Black, Winifred/Winnifred Cotter as well as using initials such as H.C and C.H.   Sources: Helena Jane Coleman Collection. E.J. Pratt Library, University of Victoria Campus, University of Toronto. Online. Accessed July 2013.
Isabella Valency Crawford Born Dublin, Ireland December 25, 1850. Died February 12, 1887. Isabella emigrated with her family from Ireland around 1958. After the death of her father in 1875 she began publishing popular verse and serialized novels in various magazines and newspapers  in Toronto and New York City. She would be the first important woman poet in Canada. A complete collection of her works was published posthumously.)
Lorna Crozier. Bon May 24, 1948. A poet she has produced 10 collections of poetry. One of her works earned the Governor General’s Award.  Many of her works explore traditional myths and histories.
Sarah Anne Curzon (née Vincent).  Born Birmingham, England 1833. Died November 18, 1898 ( sometimes recorded as November 8) She emigrated to Canada with her husband in 1862. She became a champion for women's rights and was a tireless campaigner for women's admission to the University of Toronto. She wrote several articles for various Canadian magazines before she published a play and poems :Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812 : a drama and other poems (Toronto, 1887).
Annie Charlotte Dalton Born Berkby, Huddersfield, England December 9, 1865. Died January 12, 1938. In 1891 she married Willie Dalton in in 1904 the couple emigrated to Canada. . Her home became a meeting place for the writers and readers of the area. She became president of the Vancouver Poetry Club and was an executive member of the Lower Mainland Branch of the Canadian Author’s Association and the Dominion Council. Left partially deaf from a childhood disease she became known as the Poet Laureate of the Deaf for her work on their behalf. In 1935 she became the only woman at the time to become a member of the Order of the British Empire. She author several books including Flame and Adventure, the Marriage of Music and Lilies and Leopards. Source: The History of Metropolitan Vancouver http://www.vancouverhistory.ca/whoswho_d (accessed June 19, 2009)
Mary diMichele. Born August 6, 1949. Poet and writer of several books, Mary has received numerous awards for her books of poetry.  Why not visit your library and check out her poetry?
Nora M. Duncan (née Dann). Born Vermont, Clarina, County Limerick, Ireland 1883. Died May 31, 1946. She emigrated as a child with her family to London Ontario. She received her education at Bishop Strachan School in Toronto. She married in June 1908 to Wallace Craig Duncan and the young couple spent several years in the Canadian prairies before settling in Vancouver, British Columbia. Some of her poems would be published in two of her books : Down to the Sea and Rainbow Reveries. She became the well known organizer of the radio program the Lyric West. Source: The History of Metropolitan Vancouver – Hall of Fame http://www.vancouverhistory.ca (accessed June 19, 2009
Juliana Horatia Ewin (née Gatty). Born Yorkshire, England August 3, 1841. Died May 13, 1885 Bath, Summerset, England. Juliana married Major Alexander Ewing, a military gentleman who was also a music composer. A week after their wedding the couple sailed to Fredericton, New Brunswick where their regiment had been posted. Juliana is the author of more than 30 published popular books for children , including such titles as: Trinity Flower published in 1871, It is the story of the legend about the trillium which had Canadian settings. She is considered by some as the first outstanding writer of children’s novels. Life in Canada included botany, sketching and despite chronic ill health, she enjoyed winter activities such as sleighing and snowshoeing. The family was recalled to England in 1869.  Notable among her published verses was a work entitles "Canada Home" in 1879. Her biography was written by H.K.F. Gatty in 1885. Source: Early Voices: portraits of Canada by women writers 1639-1914. Natural Heritage books, 2010.
Sheree Fitch Born Ottawa, Ontario. December 3, 1956. In grade 2 at school, Sheree published her 1st poem! She enjoyed the feeling of making people smile with her poem. She still enjoys the power of words. Her first short story sold when she was 19 years old. She works diligently to develop the text for nonsense books. It may take her up to two years to get every word in a poem just right. In 1992 , her book, There Are Monkey's In My Kitchen won the Mr. Christie's Book Award. In 1997 her book , If You Could Wear My Sneakers won the Hackmatack Award.
Gail Fox Born February 5, 1942.  She immigrated to Canada in 1963 and came to public attention with a group of poets at Queen’s University, Kingston.  She is also known as editor of the journal called Quarry.
Phyllis Fay Gotlieb Born Toronto, Ontario, January 1, 1926. Died Toronto, Ontario July 14, 2009. She attended Victoria College for her B.A. in 1948 and she earned her M.A. in 1950 from University College, University of Toronto. She married computer scienciest Calvin Gotlieb.  She was a prolific author  including four volumes of poetry, five verse plays and several science fiction stories and full novels in the 1960,60s, 1970’s and 1980’s.Her 1982 novel, A Judgement of Dragons won the Prix Auora Award for best novel.  In 2001 the new Starburst Award, given annually for speculative fiction in named in honor of her 1st book,  Sunburst published in 1964.  Source Jewish women’s Archive. Personal information for Phyllis Gotlieb <http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/perinfor.jsp?personID=639 (Accessed June 2013) ; The Canadian Encyclopedia online (Accessed March 2013)
Erica Elizabeth Arndt Harvor Born Saint John, New Brunswick 1936. This award winning poet earned her Masters degree from Concordia University, Montréal, in 1964. She has taught at Concordia University, York University, Toronto and the University of New Brunswick. She has also established courses at several institutions including Algonquin College in Ottawa. She has produced several volumes of short fiction as well as several successful novels which have been finalist for the Governor General's literature awards. She has also contributed to many periodicals including Event, Grain, The New Yorker, The Canadian Forum, Fiddlehead, Saturday Night and Poetry Canada Review.
Anne Hébert. Born Sainte-Catherine-de-Fossambault, Quebec August 1, 1916. Died January 22, 2000.  A poet, playwright, and novelist worked on Radio – Canada broadcasts and also wrote scripts for the National Film Board. She has written books of prose and some of her novels have been made into films. She writes in her native French but most of her works have been translated into English.  She has been awarded the Molson Prize in 1967 and elected to the Royal Society of Canada.
Norah Mary Holland Born Collingwood, Ontario January 10, 1876. Died April 27, 1925, She worked as a reader for the Dominion Press Clipping Bureau and later she was on the staff of the Daily News of Toronto. In 1904 she toured by foot the south of Ireland, the homeland of her mother who was the first cousin of the noted Irishman W. B. Yeats. She would publish tow books of her own verses in 1919 and 1924.
Rita Joe (née Bernard) Born March 15, 1932, Whycocamagh, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. Died March 20, 2007 Sydney, Nova Scotia.  Her mother died when she was only 5 years old and she began to live in various foster homes. When she was 10 her father died and she left Cape Breton to attend Shubenacadie Residential School. Here she was told that she was no good. Years later she would publish a book on her life at the school. After school she returned to live on the Eskasoni First Nations Reserve. In 1954 she married Frank Joe and the couple would raise 8 children and two adopted sons. In 1978 her 1st book of poetry was published. She would continue to produce books of poetry and stories and her works were included in anthologies. Her writings earned her the unofficial title of Poet Laureate of the Mi’kmaq people. In 1989 she became a Member of the Order of Canada. In 1992 she was called to the Queen’s Privy Council, one of the few non-politicians to be appointed. In 1993 she was the subject of a National Film Board Documentary “Song of Eskasoni”. In 1996 she wrote her autobiography. In 1997 she was presented with the National Aboriginal Achievement Award. Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia Online (accessed January 2014)
Helen Mar Johnson Born Magog, Lower Canada (Quebec) October 27, 1834. Died March 13, 1834. Her poetry was usually religious in nature. . There are two published works of her poetry. Poems (Boston, 18550 and Canadian Wild flowers (Boston, 1884).
Emily Pauline Johnson. Born Six Nations Indian Reserve, Canada West (Ontario) March 10, 1861. Died March 7, 1913. Canada’s first renowned native poet she was also the first native born cultural ambassador. She was working towards unity for all peoples and the land when most settlers were only thinking of human unity. She took her works all over Europe where she performed her readings in her native dress. Her native name was Tekahionwake. She was the first woman hououred by Canada Post to be featured on a Canadian postage stamp in 1961.
Penn Kemp

Born  Strathroy, Ontario August 4. She received her BA in 1966 from the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario and followed it with he Certificate in Education from Althouse College at Western. A poet, playwright and novelist she has produced 25 books (The first in 1972) and 10 CD’s. Her poetry is enhanced by sound to lift poetry off the written page. Her works have been translated into French, Spanish, Portuguese and other languages. Her sound poem Peach in Many Voices  it available in 128 different translations from Ancient Egyptian to Ojibwa. She calls herself an activist poet, dedication herself to political, social and environmental issues. In 1988 she was awarded the OGS scholarship to earn her Masters in Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto. She has been writer in residence at the University of Mumbai, twice, 1995 and again in 1999 as well as in Brazil and her own University of Western Ontario. While at Western she provided a radio show on the UWO radio station. She is the first appointed poet Laureate of the city of London, Ontario. Married to Gavin Stairs and the couple have a daughter and son. They both run Pendas Productions which produces had-bound poetry books and CD’s. Sources: University of Toronto Canadian Poetry online: Penn Kemp http://www.library.utoronto.ca/canpoetry/kemp   ... accessed June 2011. ; Personal correspondence.

Rina Lanier Born Saint Grégoire d’Iberville, Québec. August 6, 1910. Died Québec May 9, 1991. She studied at the Université de Montréal, graduating in 1931. She would later return to school to earn her degree in Library Sciences in 1942. From 1932 she worked as a journalist and in 1939 her first literary work on the life of Kateri Tekakwitha was published. Her rich, original poetry would be held in the highest regard in her home province. She was awarded the Prix David  et Duvernay for her works. Source: La Societé royale du Canada 1999.
Evelyn Lau. Born Vancouver, British Columbia July 2, 1971.  This author published her first work while still a teenager!  In 1989 she recorded her experiences as a street kid in Vancouver in a best selling work, Runaway: Diary of a Street Kid. The book was made into a movie for the CBC.  In 1992 she became the youngest poet to be nominated for a Governor General's Award.
Rosanna Eleanora Leprohn née Mullins Born Montreal, Quebec. January 12, 1829 Died September 20, 1879. A poet and novelist she would first be published when she was 17 years old. Many of her novels were published a serials, where a portion of the story would appear in a magazine each week. Her serials were carried by such noteworthy Canadian publications as the Literary Garland and the Family Herald. The second magazine brought her work into the farm homes across the country. Many of her works were translated into French so that her writings were well known in both main cultures in Canada. She accomplished all this while being the mother of 13 children!!
Florence Hamilton Livesay née Randal Born Compton, Quebec November 3, 1874. Died July 28, 1953. This writer was a poet, a journalist, a translator and a novelist. As a young woman she attended Compton's Ladies College and in the 1890's her first poems were published in Massey's Magazine. She turned to journalism and wrote for both the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Telegram. She was one of 30 volunteer teachers who . at the end of the Boer War in 1902 went to South Africa. She continued to send articles to Ottawa and Winnipeg from Africa. Married life found the family settling in Winnipeg and she produced Songs of the Ukrania (1916) consisting mainly of translations of folk music. Her career continued with more published poetry and novels. She found her young daughter's poetry hidden in a drawer and sent it to a newspaper who thought it good enough to publish, and Florence launched a career of her daughter Dorothy.
Patricia Louise Lowther. Born Vancouver, British Columbia July 29, 1935. Died September 24, 1975. She was Co–chair of the league of Canadian Poets in 1974 and later the British Columbia Arts Council.  She devoted herself to the promotion of poetry. She published 4 collections of her own poetry.  A mother of four children, she was murdered by her husband in 1975. The League of Canadian Poets annually awards the Pat Lowther Award.
Gwendolyn MacEwen. Born September 1, 1941.  This writer began her career with a collection of poetry in 1961 and in 1969 her poetry won the Governor Generals Award.  In addition she has published novels, plays, and children’s books.
Jean Jay Macpherson. Born London, England June 13, 1931.  A teacher of English at Victoria College at the University of Toronto she began publishing poetry in 1949.  Her 2nd book in 1958 won the Governor General’s Award for Poetry.  She reached out to young readers through a published classical mythology for secondary schools.
Miriam Mandel.   (née Minovitch) Born Rockglen, Saskatchewan February 13, 1930. Died February 13, 1982. After university she began writing poetry in her late 30’s when her marriage broke down.  She suffered from manic depression and she was able to express her feeling with courage and honesty in her work.  She won the Governor General’s Award in 1978.
Maria Moffatt née MacGregor Born Stratford, Ontario May 13, 1884. Died October 8, 1923. In 1906 she earned her B.A. from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. In 1909 she married Thomas E. Moffatt. While she enjoyed writing verse all her life it was not until after her death that her verses were published  "A Book of Verse (Toronto, 1924)
Mary Elizabeth Jane Muchall née Traill. Born Ashburnham, Ontario November 7, 1841. Died May 28, 1892. She was born into the literary family of Catherine Parr Trail as the 4th daughter. She sometimes used variations of the pseudonym Leanora Aura Angelica Leigh for her many published articles and short stories which appeared in such publications as The Canadian Monthly. One book of verse was published: Step by Step: the Shadow on a Canadian Home (Toronto, 1876).
Susan Musgrave. Born Santa Cruz, California, U.S.A. March 12, 1951.  She published her first book of poems, Songs of the Sea-Witch, at 17. She would find her personal life embroiled in a love affair that would end in a marriage in prison.  Her life and relationship is recorded in the CBC series Life and Times. She continues her prolific writing from her family tree house in Victoria, British Columbia.
Marion Osborne Born Montreal, Quebec May 14,1871. Died September 5, 1931. By 1902 she had been married twice and widowed twice. It is perhaps to support herself that she turned to publishing her books of poems and plays and prose. Between she would publish some five volumes of work.
Patricia Kathleen Page.  Born Swanage, Dorset, England November 23, 1916.  A poet and artist she studied in Brazil and New York City.  She lived with her ambassador husband in Australia, Brazil and Mexico.  She has written several books including a book of poetry, which won a Governor General's Award. She has also had many one woman shows of her paintings in both Canada and Mexico. 
Rhoda Ann Page Born Hackney, England 1826. Died 1863. She emigrated as a child with her family in 1832. She published a volume of verse "Wild Notes from the Backwoods" (Coburg, Canada West, 1850). In 1856 she married a Mr. Faulkner and was not to publish and additional volumes of work.
Amy Parkinson Born Liverpool England 1859 (?) Died February 12, 1938. She emigrated to Canada with her family as a child. Never of good health, she was an invalid for some 60 years and was confined to her bed. She had a love of writing verse and was aplbe to produce and publish several volumes of poetry in Canada.
Marlene Nourbese Philip Born Moriah, Tobago February 3, 1947.  A poet and novelist she has written several books including a novel for young people, Harriet’s Daughter. Try it out at your nearest library.
Sadie O. Prince Born Springfield, Nova Scotia 1861. Died 1905. She enjoyed writing poems and in 1900 she would publish a volume simply called "Poems". (Toronto, 1900)
Thérèse Renaud. Born July 3, 1927. An author, poet and a painter she is best remembered for her memoirs that broke the silence of the life of women in the belle province of Quebec. She would sign the 1948 Refus Global (Total Refusal), the manifesto that denounced the conservative and church-dominated values that held Quebec in a straight jacket. The manifesto was signed by a small group of artistes was a passionate statement affirming the link between artistic creation and social transformation.
Dorothy Sproule Born Dundas County, Ontario November 4, 1868. Died January 3, 1963. She was educated at Albert College in Belleville, Ontario and at Stanstead College in Quebec. In 1894 she married the Reverend Frederick Sproule. After the death of her husband in 1924 she looked to publishing her writings to help finances. She would publish some one dozen books of poetry during her career. in 1937 she received the Coronation Medal for her Coronation Ode.
Anne Szumigalski Born London, England January 3, 1922. Died 1999. In 1951 she immigrated to Canada from England with her husband and family. She was a translator, editor, playwright, teacher and poet who was a guiding force in founding the Saskatchewan Writer's Guild and the literary magazine Grain. Most of her books have been poems, including Voice which won the Governor General's Award. In 1995.
Colleen Tibaudeau Born December 29, 1925, Toronto, Ontario. Died London, Ontario February 6, 2012. She attended the University of Toronto , graduating with a B.A. in 1948 followed by a Masters Degree Contemporary Canadian Poetry. December 29, 1931 she married a budding playwright by the name of James Reaney  (   -2008) . The couple had three children. While the family lived in various places throughout the country including Winnipeg and Victoria, they would settle in London, Ontario. Her first book of poetry Lozenges: poems in the shapes of things was published in 1965. She continued publishing for the next  4 decades leaving a true treasure trove for her country to absorb. Her works often took inspiration from the ordinary items of everyday life. She would become praised as a Canadian treasure for her works. Source: Canada’s secret national treasure found magic in the everyday. Sandra Martin Globe and Mail February 10, 2012. Suggestion submitted by June Coxon, Ottawa, Ontario.
Léonise Valois

'
Attala’ or 'Atala'

 
Born October 11, 1868, Quebec. Died May 1936. Her 1st job as a journalist was with Le Monde illustré where she was hired in 1900 to write the women’s page. Her pen name was ‘Attala’ or ‘Atala’. In 1904 she was a member of the group of 16 women who took a Canadian Pacific train trip to cover the St. Louis World’s Fair. On the train trip home the women formed the Canadian Women’s Press Club that would survive as an organization for 100 years. After the trip Léonise worked in a post office until she retired in 1929. Later in life she would return to writing sporadically for various Quebec journals. She was the 1st woman in Quebec to publish a volume of poetry, Fleurs sauvages in 1910. She wrote for La Terre de chez nous, a weekly agricultural newspaper until 1931 when she had an accident that had her in a coma for 63 days. She slowly recuperated and published a second book of poetry in 1934 called Feuilles tombées. A feminist to the last, her will specified that capital funds to her sisters did not require signature of their husbands. At this time, Quebec law required husbands to endorse inheritance cheques for wives to receive the monies. Source. Linda Kay. Sweet Sixteen (McGill Queens University press, 2012) . Book: Léonise Valois: femme de lettres by Louise Warren (Hexagon, 1993)
 
Miriam  Waddington. (née Dworkin) Born Winnipeg, Manitoba December 23, 1917.Died March 3, 2004 Vancouver, British Columbia. She had a traditional  Jewish upbringing and found it somewhat of a shock when her family moved to Ottawa and she attended Public High School. She earned her BA at the university of Toronto in 1939 and that same year married Patrick Waddington. She e earned a diploma in Social work at the University of Toronto and went on to earn her Masters in Social Work at the University of Pennsylvania in 1949. She was a social worker in Toronto and later in Montreal but her love of poetry would soon lead her life in a different direction.  She wrote poetry and short fiction with 11 published works to her credit. Miriam's book Driving Home won the J. I. Segal Award in 1972 and she was 2 times the winner of Senior Writing Fellowships from the Canada Council. She won the Boreston Mountain Awards for best poetry in 1963, 1966 and again in 1974.   She was a specialist on the subject of A.M. Klein. In 1998 she was the Canada Council exchange poet in Wales. She served as Writer in Residence at Windsor Public Library and later at the University of Ottawa. Her poem Jacques Cartier In Toronto is featured on the Back of the Canadian $100.00 Bill issued in 2004. Source: Menkis, Richard "Miriam Dworkin Waddington" Jewish Women: A Cojmprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. March 2009. Jewish Women's Archive. Accessed June 30, 2013.
Naomi Wakan Naomi Beth Wakan Born London, England. July 20, 1931. Naomi earned a degree in social work from Birmingham University before she married. Eventually emigrating to Toronto with her son and daughter she worked specializing in early childhood traumas. After marriage to sculptor Elias Wakan there was extensive travel for a few years. They would spend two years in Japan where Naomi obtained a respect and love of the poetry of Haiku. Settling on the west coast of Canada they operated a publishing company, Pacific Rim Publishing House, producing educational children’s books of Naomi’s authorship. In 1996 the couple moved to Gabriola Island, off Canada’s west coast, where they opened Drumbeg House Studio. Elias  displays and sells his intricate wood sculptures and Naomi sells paintings and fabric art.  She has written/compiled over thirty-five books including Haiku: one breath Poetry (Heian International), which was a choice of the Canadian Children’s Book Centre and was also selected by the American Library Association for the 2001. She has had her short stories and poems published in several world magazines and web sites. In 2006 Late bloomer- on writing late in life (Toronto:  Wolsak and Wynn Publishers) followed by Compositions: notes on the written word, (Wolsak and Wynn, 2008)  introducing Espoe, her form of writing which combines poetry within essays. Source: Naomi Beth Wakan web site  www.naomiwakan.com  (Accessed June 2008) Also correspondence with Naomi Wakan.
Anna Louisa Walker Born Kiddermore, Staffordshire, England 1836. Died July 7, 1907. In 1857 she emigrated to Canada with her family In 1858 she and her sisters ran a private schools for Girls in Sarnia. She enjoyed writing verse and published several books including Leaves from the Canadian Backwoods (Montreal , Lovell, 1861) She also published a novel called A Canadian Heroine (London 1873. In 1883 she married Harry Coghill and some of her works appear under the name of Mrs. Coghill. One of her poems became a well known hymn " Work, for the night is coming."
Phyllis Webb Born Victoria, British Columbia April 8, 1927. She attended both the University of British Columbia and McGill University in Montreal. She published her first book of poems in 1954 Trio. More books followed in 1956 and 1957. She won a grant to study dream an theatre and took off to study in France. More published poems appeared in 1962 and 1965. Between 1964-1965 she worked as a broadcaster at the CBC in Toronto and then she migrated to the west coast where she worked to publish yet more poems in 1971 and appeared with yet more publications in 1980, 1982 and 1984. She also found time to she her knowledge and teach at the University of British Columbia, the University of Victoria, British Columbia, the University of Alberta and the Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta. This prolific dramatic poet has made a substantial contribution to the poetry of our nation.
Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald Born April 26, 1857, Rockwood, Canada West (Ontario) Died March 9, 1940m Fenwick, Ontario. When she was seven the family moved to Philadelphia where her father worked teaching. Awhile later back in Canada on the Niagara Peninsula she attended Rockwood Academy run by her father. She late attended a Quaker School in Union Springs, New York, U.S.A. and Pickering College in Ontario. Her first poem was published when she was 17. From 1880-1882 she wrote stories for the Rose-Bedford Canadian Monthly. Under the pen name of Bel Thistlewaite she began contributing to the Toronto Globe in 1886 and continued her freelance contributions to numerous Canadian publications. In 1886 she also published her first novel An Algonquin Maiden: a romance of the early days of Upper Canada. The work was proven to be very popular with three editions being published. She would go on to publish 5 volumes of poetry in the 1900’s. Many of her poems were included over the years in various anthologies of Canadian Literature. In 1921 she published Tree-Top Morning: a book of verse for children. As a single parent she adopted a daughter Dorothy Wetherald Rungeling (1911-   ) who would eventually publish collections of her mother’s work.  Source: Guide to the Literary Heritage of Waterloo and Wellington Counties. 1985.
Anne Wilkinson. Born Toronto, Ontario September 21. 1890 Died May 10, 1961.  Chiefly a poet her works appear in various anthologies (books of collected poems or stories) and were published in several small magazines.  She was the founding editor of the magazine the “Tamarack Review”.  She also published a biography of the famous Canadian Osler family, a couple of novels, and a modern fairy tale for children.
   
   
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